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Welcome to the Postural Restoration Community! This is where you will read the latest industry news, hear about upcoming events, find helpful deadline reminders, and view a plethora of additional resources regarding our techniques and curriculum. The great part about it is--not only can you can view the entries we post, you can also post about the things that matter to you. Did you find an interesting article about a technique you learned in one of your courses? Do you have a patient case study you want to share with other professionals? Simply click "Submit an Entry" and follow the easy steps towards getting your information published in the PRI Community!

Blog Posts in 2010

We received this email from a PRI educated clinician in Minnesota:

“I just thought I’d pass on some information from a Nova program that was on television recently. A doctor was researching genetic abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy. He was interested in this field because both his older and younger brothers suffered from the disease.

He found an area in the genetic sequence where muscle genes had been “turned off”. He then tested himself and others who didn’t have the disease and determined that normal individuals also had these genes “turned off.” He then studied the genetic code of chimpanzee’s and the great apes and discovered that their genes were still “on.” He then discovered that the genes in question controlled the size and strength of the masseter (jaw) muscle.

Human masseter muscle has been on the evolutionary decline for some time now and is a fraction of the size found amongst the apes. In fact, the great apes have a masseter approaching the size of our quadriceps muscle. I thought perhaps our muscles have declined because we eat more marshmallows than they do but the doctor had a better explanation.

He reasoned that the greater the size and strength of the masseter muscle, the earlier in life the skull articulations must fuse in order to oppose the muscle’s pull. Ape skull articulations apparently fuse at about 3-4 years of age whereas human skull articulations don’t fuse until approximately 30 years of age. The delayed fusion has allowed our brains (and skull) to expand over the years in contrast to the apes.

The moral of the story is that improving human intelligence and brain size is more important than eating a tough steak.”

Mark Wolf, PT

Posted November 12, 2010 at 4:36PM
Categories: Articles

Deciding which arm to reach with during PRI Non-Manual Techniques is a common topic that comes up.  Kurt Weidauer, DPT recently wrote an article that discusses this very topic.  You can read this article HERE!

Posted November 4, 2010 at 4:40PM
Categories: Articles Clinicians

This is an email we received from a Physical Therapist last week…

History:

38 year old female with history of allergies (fall season is worst), 2 back surgeries, right knee arthroscopy
Being seen for low back pain – PRI effectively eliminating pain
Meanwhile, neck problem - went to a NUCCA practitioner
Noticed sinus cavities would change post NUCCA treatments (sometimes better, sometimes worse)
Manually worked on the sphenoid and had great results – learned the right sinus cavity is an “indicator” for this patient
Noted that bed positioning was knocking the atlas out of position: when turning, she would lean & pivot on her head – stopped doing that
Began identifying other things that would gradually pull atlas out of position: including a “subconscious” jaw left protrusion (sustained contraction) she identified whenever she laid down – especially on left side (left jaw received feedback from the pillow and pressed into it)
Performing regular left lateral pterygoid strengthening

Results:

Whenever right sinus cavity is closed/restricted, all she has to do is activate left lateral pterygoid and the right sinus cavity will re-open.  If left lateral pterygoid doesn’t work within a few minutes, then she goes to the NUCCA person…afterwhich, the left lateral pterygoid exercises work like a charm
Have been testing this theory now for 2 months: initially, it wouldn’t hold very long (just like a weak muscle), but now right sinus cavity can be restored within minutes (first thing in AM), and left lateral pterygoid can be strengthened as needed throughout the day – but really, it’s now >6wks that this person is able to breathe through both nostrils
OH, and I forgot to mention: she has NO allergies anymore?  And, this year is particularly bad.  Two years ago she was so desperate re: how bad the fall allergies are to her that she spent $3500 on experimental allergy drops, dreads the fall…  now… no allergies!

Theory:

The ability to hold the position of the atlas (and therefore decrease the need to go to NUCCA appointments) is directly related to the rest of PRI: if left lateral pterygoid is strong and not pulling it out, then what about the other asymmetrical influences further down the chains?  As soon as we laid off the other areas of weakness (emphasis = low traps, thoracic rounding & left IO, left adductor/hamstring, right glute), the # NUCCA appointments also began increasing.  After the next NUCCA, those exercises were re-emphasized… and voila!  It was about a month before she went to NUCCA again (vs every 2 weeks).

Results:
It has now been 10 months since NUCCA has started and some conclusions that I’m drawing:

Position of atlas is vital to overall health
Atlas & sphenoid relationship is vital to overall health – and something very specific as related to allergies/allergic reactions
Sphenoid position directly relates to sensation of “clear nostrils”
NUCCA alone only puts the atlas back into place… what’s going to hold it there?
When the atlas is placed in the ideal position, left lateral pterygoid (for this individual) can effectively reposition/and hold the sphenoid in its ideal place, which in turn holds the atlas in place
When the sphenoid doesn’t reposition easily, the atlas is not in its ideal position
If NUCCA appointments occur frequently because the person isn’t “holding their position,” then the answer is PRI – there is likely a subconscious muscle tension / a part of the asymmetrical influences identified by PRI that is ultimately pulling atlas out of place

Really, I’m just wanting to share this with Ron – it’s quite amazing!

Posted November 1, 2010 at 4:42PM
Categories: Clinicians

Let me take this opportunity to introduce myself, as I have already been impressed by the caring and passionate nature of the few of you I have met so far.  My name is Heidi Wise, and I am an optometrist in Lincoln, Nebraska.  I first met Ron Hruska a couple years ago. I have had the opportunity, since meeting him, to assist him and other PRI therapists to further progress their patients with visual modifications.  But it wasn’t until earlier this year that I began to see the full impact that interdisciplinary integration, between optometry and PRI-based physical therapy, could really have on patients’ lives.

My optometric background has been varied, but for quite some time has focused on vision as it relates to the entire person. This approach considers their behavior, their ability to perform at their maximum potential at school, work, and in athletics, as well as how they function in their every day life.  This isn’t what I thought I’d be doing when I began practicing!  I graduated in 1998 from Southern College of Optometry and began practicing what is known as primary care optometry.  This includes the prescribing of glasses and contacts, as well as diagnosis and treatment of eye disease.  I began to notice after a few years that there were many children who did not possess the visual skills really necessary to excel at school with the amount of effort commensurate with their intelligence level.  To make matters worse, these are not typically problems that glasses or contacts can fix.  In 2003, I went into private practice to address this issue.  There was a regional shortage of optometrists providing this type of care, which usually includes vision training, and I was frustrated with the lack of treatment options for these children. 

After becoming experienced in this area of optometry, which is sometimes called “behavioral” optometry, I was asked to consider caring for patients who had experienced traumatic brain injuries or cerebral vascular incidents.  I was fortunate enough to learn some of the basis of this type of care from another colleague, and soon realized this was not all that different from my work with children.  The two categories were simply on opposite ends of a continuum, which included visual-motor skills as well as visual-perception skills.  One group hadn’t had the fortune to develop the skills, and the other had possessed them to some degree, but those skills were compromised by an injury to the brain. 

In 2005, I began providing care onsite, as well as at my office, to inpatients and outpatients of Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Each of these type of patients, whether it was a child or an adult with poor vision skills, such as a lazy eye, focusing problems affecting behavior, double vision, or problems interpreting their world visually after an injury, has given me a broad base of understanding the eye’s influence on the brain and vice versa. 

Now, I am working with the Hruska Clinic therapists, seeing patients in tandem, to use vision and vision perception to change postural and movement patterns of patients who have not been successful in making or maintaining these PRI directed changes.  I am learning a lot about PRI principles and techniques.  The more patients we see, the more we are learning, together, the true potential of what can be accomplished through the visual system.  It is a well-documented fact that 70-80% of all neural connections relate to vision, and that only 20% of those are concerned with our central vision, which provides our clarity.  The 20% determines how far down we are able to read the letters on the eye test chart whether it’s with or without correction.  The 80% that relate to treatment of PRI vision, frontal plane astigmatism, cyclo-torsion, curvature of the spine, dizziness, visual push or visual pull, myopic myokinematics, visual midline shifts, or other associated neuro-visual postural influences will be shared with you in the future.

In moving forward, we will share information with you, the PRI therapists, so that you may grow in your understanding just as we are.  I gave the first in-service to the therapists at the Hruska Clinic last week and will continue to develop training materials with Ron for both PRI therapists and future optometric partners.  I am looking forward with great anticipation to not only the Interdisciplinary Integration PRI course this spring but also to assisting PRI therapists in understanding the role vision can play in your treatment programs. 

Check back often, as this site will be used to post recommended references to help you establish your knowledge base about PRI Vision.  Also, any information that I, in conjunction with the therapists at the Hruska Clinic, feel is beneficial to you along the way will be added.

I look forward to working with you all as we embark on what will truly be an amazing journey! 

-Dr. Heidi Wise

Posted October 20, 2010 at 4:45PM
Categories: PRI Vision

We are excited to share this success story with you sent to us by Mike Cantrell, MPT, PRC.  His patient describes her journey through Physical Therapy and how PRI saved her running career.  Check it out HERE!

Posted October 19, 2010 at 4:55PM
Categories: Clinicians Patients

This email and photo from Lynne Ellen Kershaw in my Monday morning inbox - it’s sure to be a great week!

“Hey Janie- I have a class for athletes on Sunday afternoons. We always start off with PRI exercises before we do Pilates. They absolutely love blowing up the balloons! The guys in the picture are playing football right now and heading into basketball. Thought you might like! - LE”

Curious about the balloons? Click HERE.

Posted October 11, 2010 at 5:00PM
Categories: Athletics Clinicians

Here is the 5th installment to the Balanced Regeneration articles written by Lisa Bartels.  This article in on the facilitation of the gluteus maximus.  To read this article, CLICK HERE!

Posted October 11, 2010 at 4:58PM
Categories: Articles Clinicians

We are often asked by PRI clinicians for recommended articles to share with the dentists and optometrists with whom they integrate. Ron Hruska recommends THIS article from the Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry. The discussion in this article provides an excellent introduction to our 2011 Interdisciplinary Integration course!

Posted September 21, 2010 at 8:17AM
Categories: Articles

For the Hruska Adduction Lift Test, one thing I want to ask about is the patient to therapist size ratio.  I’m a tall guy, when I perform this test I really try to keep the upper leg at a “reasonable” height for the patient’s body.  It also seems that the passive hip abduction test will highly correlate.  Can you comment on this?

I have frequently been asked this question in classes across the country.  In short, the height of the examiner is not a significant issue up to a point.  There appears to be range of tolerance with regard to ability to perform the test and the height of the examiner.  Normal abduction is in the order of 45 degrees.  If the examiners’ height takes the LE well-beyond 45 degrees then height might become an issue.  I am 6’1” and have yet to discover anyone that I felt was adversely affected by my height. However if I were Shaquille Oneal and my patient was less than 5 feet then height could become an issue.

At that point I still have some options:
1. call in another examiner
2. place the top most lower extremity on the wall (which I hate to do since I
like to feel what the top LE is doing)
3. use the Abduction Lift Test since there is a good correlation between the
two
4. all of the above!

The test is helping us understand how well the patient can recruit and inhibit multiple muscles so we want to be sure that we score accurately.  In fact, another name for the test could be the: “How Well Do You Shift Into Acetabular Femoral Internal Rotation And Recruit And Inhibit Muscle Test” but it’s kind of long and that acronym HWDYSIAFIRARAIT just doesn’t flow.

- Mike Cantrell

Posted September 20, 2010 at 8:21AM
Categories: Clinicians

Check out the latest Video Blog by Lori Thomsen, MPT, PRC.  Here she discusses inhibition techniques for “tight calves”.  Watch it HERE!

Posted September 13, 2010 at 8:28AM
Categories: Videos
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