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Welcome to the Postural Restoration Community! This is where you will read the latest industry news, hear about upcoming events, find helpful deadline reminders, and view a plethora of additional resources regarding our techniques and curriculum. The great part about it is--not only can you can view the entries we post, you can also post about the things that matter to you. Did you find an interesting article about a technique you learned in one of your courses? Do you have a patient case study you want to share with other professionals? Simply click "Submit an Entry" and follow the easy steps towards getting your information published in the PRI Community!

Blog Posts in 2012

Would you like to know what Ron was thinking during his Saturday morning coffee? Check out his blog below, as he shares some thoughts!

The last patient of my week, on last Friday, was a 19 year old young man that was referred to me for anterior shin pain and chronic shin “splints”.  He had a history of back pain and is a runner and was an avid hockey player.  He reports when he doesn’t do anything, his anterior shin pain does not bother him.  He has been to every specialist possible for this type of problem, except by someone who has taken a PRI course or is trained or certified in PRI.

The first thing I read in my Saturday local paper, over a cup of coffee, was an article written by a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. “Give shin splints time to heal” was the title of the article.  Needless to say, after reading the article, I had a hard time finishing my coffee, and I could feel my body begin to “splint”.  The physician reported that shin splints develop because of overuse of the posterior tibialis muscle in the lower leg near the shin.  He did mention that shin splints can be caused by tibial stress fractures.  His advice; rest, ice, compress, elevate and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.  As the pain gradually goes away, start with a walking program.  Accordingly, if you return to your training too early or too intense your shin splint may come back.  He goes on to talk about the need for warm ups, to use the 10 percent rule or not to increase time or intensity of your workouts more than 10 percent per week, and to strengthen the muscles around you “lower” legs and ankles.  In his opinion, “Many great runners have experienced shin splints, rested the muscle and gone on to glory.”  This syndicate writer did not mention what a shoe orthotic, a good supportive shoe, a biomechanical oriented program for the upper leg including the pelvis and hips, or a myokinematic program for transverse plane stability at the femur or calcaneus might do for this “splint” pain.

The word “splint” according to Webster, means ‘a rigid device used to prevent motion of a joint or the ends of a fractured bone’.  When one is splinting they are in a feed forward process.  Pain does not allow one to relax and therefore makes one ‘splint’.  The pain, may subside if they do nothing.  However, that does not address the neurologic feed forward system issues because the dysfunctional torsion on the bone has not been addressed. 

My Friday afternoon patient did well with a PRI approach and actually could alter his shin splint pain after his left AIC, right BC and right TMCC patterns were considered.  The torsion on his tibial bone appeared to be coming from a right forward shoulder and the lack of a left posterior mediastinum, an extended postural pattern that was reinforced by a former head injury, and a deep lordotic back (40 to 50 degrees of straight leg raise).  He felt his shin “splints” come and go in the clinic when he learned how to move over his left hip properly, flex his thorax and lumbar spine correctly with ambulation and visually see and feel the ground in front of him, appropriately. 

My Monday morning cup of coffee was more enjoyable, only because this message allowed me to splint a little less.  Thank you.

Posted July 30, 2012 at 2:46PM

Attending Myokinematic Restoration in Monterey, CA August 25-26, 2012? The course location has changed to the address below to accommodate more attendees. New hotel recommendations are below, as well. Please contact Paige with any questions!

Ryan Ranch Physical Therapy
21 Upper Ragsdale Drive, #125, Monterey, CA 93940
Phone #831-372-2963

Embassy Suites Monterey Bay
1441 Canyon Del Rey Blvd, Seaside, CA 93955
#831-393-1115
*3.5 miles from course site

Comfort Inn Monterey Peninsula Airport
1200 Olmsted Road, Monterey, CA 93940
#831-372-2945
*2 miles from course site, near airport

Best Western Plus on the Beach
2600 Sand Dunes Drive, Monterey, CA 93940
#831-394-3321
*4 miles from course site

Posted July 27, 2012 at 2:56PM

The University of Michigan Health System Continuing Education Program will be sponsoring Myokinematic Restoration on September 8-9th, 2012 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. To register for this course, CLICK HERE!

Posted July 25, 2012 at 3:01PM

Last month, Ron Hruska, MPA, PT was one of eight medical professionals to present at the 3rd Annual DePaul Sports Medicine Symposium in Chicago, Illinois. To view Ron’s presentation on Postural Restoration: Concepts and Treatment in the Athletic Training Room, CLICK HERE!

Posted July 18, 2012 at 3:12PM

We are excited to announce the course topic for the 5th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium; Athletic Performance! This two day symposium will feature 5-6 guest speakers and will be held on April 11-12th, 2013 in Lincoln, NE. We will be announcing the speaker list and course description soon!

Posted July 13, 2012 at 3:17PM

Check out the most recent interview, featuring Dan Houglum, PT, MSPT, ATC. Dan has been attending PRI courses for nearly 10 years and plans to apply for Postural Restoration Certification this fall. Working at Accelerated Rehab in Grayslake, Illinois, he has gained support in his utilization of Postural Restoration from his administration and co-workers and hosted several PRI courses. To read his story, CLICK HERE!

Posted July 9, 2012 at 3:23PM

Check out an awesome testimonial from Josh Owen, ATC, who recently hosted Impingement & Instability in June in North Carolina!

“WOW! is all I have to say! We had so many PRC and PRT’s in attendance, two speakers, and had a blast along the way.  I think overall everyone was pleased and experienced several “ah-ha!” moments.  Just specifically who was in attendance and having the great mixture of teaching styles of Mike and James solidified all of the principles of the Impingement and Instability course.  I think out of this entire process of hosting and experiencing this specific weekend, this is what PRI is all about.  It’s about bringing together professionals who are willing to collaborate and push the boundaries of physical science and medicine in an open environment to learn about restoring the body into its proper position to successfully carry out its functions. Thanks for letting me be a part of it!”

If you are interested in hosting a PRI course in 2013, please contact or fill out a Host a Course form! Dates are limited!

Posted July 5, 2012 at 3:31PM

Jason Masek, MSPT, ATC, CSCS, PRC found this excellent article; Breathing pattern disorders and physiotherapy: inspiration for our profession.

An interesting summary from this article reads:
“Currently in western medicine, a fundamental push is to encourage healthy life style skills. Education in one of the most fundamental tools, and yet breathing has not been emphasized enough as part of this healthy lifestyle package. For the clinician the observation of breathing can provide insight into many systems, including biomechanics, biochemistry/physiology, and psychology reflecting the consideration of a multisystem approach.”

To learn more about how Postural Restoration restores postural influences on rib torsion, asymmetrical oblique strength, inconsistent breathing patterns, habitual use of accessory respiratory musculature and a restricted diaphragm, consider attending the Postural Respiration course.

Posted June 27, 2012 at 3:37PM

A recent attendee of the Pelvis Restoration course sent us these two excellent Pelvic Floor research articles: Effects of Lumbar Lordosis and Pelvic Inlet Orientation on the Outcome of the Transobturator Tape Sling Operation In Women and Lumbosacral Spine and Pelvic Inlet Changes Associated With Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

Along with these two articles, was the following question:
“Why do many research articles (including these two) show that excessive lumbar lordosis seems to be protective against pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI)?
To read Lori Thomsen’s response to this email, CLICK HERE!

Posted June 20, 2012 at 3:51PM

As the Postural Restoration Certification (PRC) Application Deadline of September 15th approaches I wanted to share some common questions I’m receiving…

Q: Despite having attended many PRI courses I’m not confident that I know the information well enough to pass an exam. Who could possibly understand it as well as Ron:) Any advice on preparing for this?
A: Your apprehension is shared by many who have successfully completed the PRC process! It’s important to keep in mind that the information tested is that from Myokinematic Restoration, Postural Respiration and Advanced Integration courses.  Information from other PRI courses will definitely help advance your overall knowledge base and strengthen your application but the course information from these other courses is not specifically tested. The exam was created in 2004 and for the most part remains unchanged. So even as the science continues to evolve, the basic fundamentals are what is important to consider in preparing. One more thing to consider is that the PRC Application Process itself it designed to prepare you for PRC testing and the information that you’ll receive back from our Application Review Committee will have specific comments to assist you in preparing. The Committee will make an overall recommendation as to whether your application demonstrates your readiness for PRC.

Q: If I have previously attended the Advanced Integration course, is it necessary to repeat the course immediately prior to PRC testing?
A: No. You are not required to attend the Advanced Integration course again. If you would like to attend the course in preparation for testing, you will receive a 20% discount on the tuition fee. In years past, the Advanced Integration course has provided an opportunity for the PRC class to form relationships and friendships that last for many years to come. After the first day of the course, we introduce the PRC candidates to each other. From there it’s typical to see study groups forming in the evenings over coffee or even nights of dancing and music:)You can study and prepare for PRC together or socialize and build relationships with colleagues who share your passion for Postural Restoration! The course is an excellent opportunity to review and advance your understanding of integrative concepts as you prepare for the PRC process!

Q: I have not yet attended Advanced Integration but plan to in December. Can I also apply for PRC this year?
A: Yes. In this case, please indicate your intention to attend Advanced Integration in December on your PRC application. Keep in mind that we recommend a minimum of 2-3 years of PRI experience prior to applying for PRC.

Q: I will be submitting my PRC application this year. Should I go ahead and make travel arrangements?
A: No. Please wait until after the PRC Application Review process is complete. You will want to consider all Reviewer feedback prior to making a final decision about attending the PRC process in December. Your application review will be complete by October 15th allowing plenty of time for travel arrangements.

Please feel free to email me any additional questions you might have.

Posted June 14, 2012 at 3:55PM
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