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Welcome to the Postural Restoration Community! This is where you will read the latest industry news, hear about upcoming events, find helpful deadline reminders, and view a plethora of additional resources regarding our techniques and curriculum. The great part about it is--not only can you can view the entries we post, you can also post about the things that matter to you. Did you find an interesting article about a technique you learned in one of your courses? Do you have a patient case study you want to share with other professionals? Simply click "Submit an Entry" and follow the easy steps towards getting your information published in the PRI Community!

Blog Posts in 2014

“Its Monday Morning, I’ve just taken my first PRI course and now what do I do and where do I start?”

If you have just taken your first PRI course and you feel a bit overloaded with information, don’t feel alone.  The first time I went to a PRI course, can I tell you I was intrigued, stunned and just a bit intimidated all at the same time?  I didn’t know what the heck I was doing so on Monday morning I had a bunch of people blowing up balloons! (Take the Postural Respiration course and you will know what I mean!)

In fact, the entire body of knowledge of PRI can feel like one big elephant you are trying to digest.  And you know the old question, how do you eat an elephant?  One bite at a time!

The first thing to do is what you learn in every course and that is to breathe and relax. There is a lot information here that needs to sink in over time and you won’t get it all the first time. No one that has taken one of these courses has gotten it all the first time but if a door is opened to your curiosity and caring to learn more you are definitely on the right track!

What helped me in my overwhelm was to create a picture in my mind of some of the basics.  For instance, we aren’t symmetrical and never will be but the point is to manage asymmetries and get neutral. Then, have a simple picture anatomically of the basic asymmetries left and right side and how they affect position and posture thru polyarticular chains.  Remember how the diaphragm is the key player and you have a simple way to describe what you are doing to yourself, patients or clients.  They will be impressed by just a short, and I mean short, description of their anatomy and how it affects them.

On Monday morning, pick one person you feel comfortable with to experiment on.  If you have a colleague that has gone to a course practice with them.   Tell your patient that you just got out of a course and you want to try some powerful tools with them.    If you took a Myokinematics course, practice an abduction drop test and show them one basic exercise.  It is best that you practice that exercise yourself and continue to practice PRI tests and exercises yourself, so you know what it feels like and what to feel when you are in position for facilitation and inhibition.  PRI works best when we are managing our own asymmetries!

Immediately you have knowledge and application of assessment and corrective positioning that is really sophisticated and you have just scratched the surface.  You can build on this by learning a new assessment or two with a new corrective position every day.

Have your manual close.  Refer to it, study it and get a more detailed picture in your mind of how the human body works and how you can be more effective.  This is called building a body of knowledge and it doesn’t happen overnight but you can get results and get excited with just the basics and build on top of them.

If you went to a live seminar, order the home study course and review it a few times.  If you got a home course, go to a live course to interact with the instructor and fellow students.  Pack a bunch of questions in your bag when you go!  If you get a little frustrated with all the information and it doesn’t make sense all at once, then you are a normal human being!  Hang in there.  The good news is that becoming more skilled and competent is satisfying and meaningful and that building a body of knowledge and expanding what you know is just plain fun!   

Posted June 10, 2014 at 9:21AM
Categories: Clinicians Courses

Pittsburgh, PA - "I had a great weekend teaching an entire class of 17 newbies to the science of PRI with Myokinematic Restoration. Jeremy Smith was a great host and we all enjoyed his facility at Iron City Elite in the suburbs of Pittsburgh. It was truly an interdisciplinary meeting of PT’s, DC’s, ATC’s, CSCS’s and personal trainers. We all had a blast learning together. These individuals left excited about trying out their new knowledge of respiration and AFIR!  Yes, Ron they all  got the concept of hole control in the Iron City!  Go #prination!  It was great to see the influence of social media on the spreading of this great nation!  It was fun to meet in person some of my PRI twitter followers! "#Welcometotheforest #nogoingback @lewis61FP” One of my favorite post course tweets!" - Jen Poulin

Whittier, CA  - "This weekend I had the wonderful opportunity to present Myokinematic Restoration to a significant number of “new” PRI course attendees on the campus of Southern California University of Health Sciences, where 600 chiropractic students graduate yearly. This was a high cerebral powered group and kept me on my toes, which fueled me to the max daily.  Because of this infusion I reminded myself that our left hemispheres make all of us human. By teaching this class I once again was reminded of the human need to use our left hemispheric mindedness for Left AIC patterning. We often are encouraged to facilitate certain antagonistic muscle in PRI to oppose three planes of left hemispheric activity or the Left AIC pattern. But it is because of courses like this I get to focus on what is really important to focus on, the inhibition of Left AIC overactive muscle, so that we can involve our right hemispheric creativity and bilateral function. It was so much fun to discuss and demonstrate the need to inhibit the left gluteus maximus and the right adductor group of the leg to restore bilateral use of our bodies in the frontal plane. This Left AIC position also includes sagittal and transverse patterned muscle that needs to be inhibited for tri-planar bilateral success. Therefore, focusing on inhibition programs for the left iliacus and the  left psoas and the right bicep femoris was equally rewarding for me to think about. However, the need to disengage a left tensor fascia latae muscle that is trying to move the left acetabulum on the femur for AFIR is so important to occasionally be mindful of, just as remembering the importance of reducing the right quadratus lumborum activity that more than likely is being used in attempting to gain right acetabular external rotation on the femur (Right AFER).  I absolutely love discussing this kind of neuro integration and neuro inhibition in the facilitation of desirable lateralized direction." - Ron Hruska
 

Seattle, WA - "I enjoyed a sunny beautiful weekend teaching Myokinematic Restoration in majestic Seattle Washington with the staff from PRO Sports Club in a great facility designed for rehab, fitness and sports performance. Thanks Carl for being such a great host and for trusting me on my movie recommendations. They say it can rain a lot in Seattle, but I’ve never seen it, because it’s always sunny and beautiful when I go.

Grateful to be so well assisted by Betsy Baker-Bold, PRC from Olympic Physical Therapy and to see her be so willing to share all she knows. An open attitude with a desire to effectively mentor others has always helped make this Institute great.

We had a great time discussing hot topics like pelvic and hip position, ligamentous muscle, muscle function in three planes and human performance. Its so great to see PRI grow and expand across the Pacific Northwest with several different clinicians and clinics all jockeying to be the next host site for whatever the Institute may be planning to teach in the region". - James Anderson

Posted June 5, 2014 at 11:29AM
Categories: Courses

To summarize part I for those who didn’t see it, I treated a gentleman with biceps tendinosis giving my best efforts to treat within the realm of what the patient and his physician expected.  He was pleased, reported 90% improvement and had met all but one of his functional goals—and I wasn’t content.  I wasn’t content because I hadn’t been bold/confident enough to risk the referral source by advocating for the patient like I had wanted to.  When things had a hitch, I had broached the subject of asymmetry several times, with a discussion of thorax and diaphragm position combined with respiration being key to arthrokinematics and myokinematics of the affected left shoulder briefly.  But the feedback each time was something of the “dang kids and their wide-eyed plans.”  So, I deferred to the ‘gold standard’ treatment of the day for said diagnosis outlined briefly in part I of this story with some PRI principles intertwined the best I could without the patient’s objection.

Three months later, Don arrived for this second round of PT with a diagnosis of left shoulder s/p arthroscopic subacromial decompression with a distal clavicle resection and biceps tenotomy.  His orders were specific to “ROM and strengthening” and he had a firm grip on what he wished to achieve per his physician’s orders.  Though I mentioned that, after the first couple of weeks, it would be wise to treat the cause rather than the symptoms of his left shoulder problem, he only agreed we’d reassess after a few weeks.

I saw him once a week for three weeks and he attained full ROM, felt wondersplendiferous (there is a small reward for whoever first tweets the three root words for this nonsensical term) and he was touting my praises loudly when he arrived at the fourth visit.  No pain, full motion, strong, highly functional at home and with hobbies.

Most of you reading this have been there.  We pray this patient maintains this status and we don’t want to be the bad-news “physical torturist” because sometimes they are functional for a long time this way.  Knowing his reluctance to work outside the realm of he and his surgeon’s normal, I stood down.  He had met all of his goals, he did have functional strength, motion and his goals were met.  I simply reminded him that I had done very little, that there was likely still a root cause of this now-recurring left shoulder dysfunction, not to feel hopeless if it did ever recur, wished him my best and discharged him—physician and patient goals met.  

For now.

I’m interested in your feedback, stories, predictions for part III, anything you'd like to add to this little story so far.  Again, this is outlining a classic case where the road less traveled is a bit risky, and in this case I took the easy way out with some objective data to support my decision. 

Part III coming soon…

Posted June 2, 2014 at 10:15AM
Categories: Clinicians

I just recently finished reading "It's a Jungle In There" by David Rosenbaum. This cognitive psychology overview, with a Darwinian perspective, touched on 'perceiving more than is really there'. Phenomena often reflect "top-down" processing. The term refers to high-level interpretation biasing perception, so perception is not just dictated by immediate sensory data or "bottom-up" processing, but is also shaped by expectations. Over-competition and under-cooperation among relevant neural representatives can bias perception.

The last course I taught in Richmond, VA was Cervical-Cranio-Mandibular Restoration, and it was attended by a number of 'neural representatives' that were once "bottom-up" processors and are now "top-down" perceivers. I really enjoyed their cooperation and non-competitive communication!

Posted May 28, 2014 at 2:23PM
Categories: Clinicians Books

There is now a Postural Restoration Google Group! We welcome fellow PRI practitioners to join! The purpose of this group is to facilitate the exchange of PRI based concepts, ask advice about challenging cases, post important research articles, and create discussion regarding any PRI ideas or techniques that you care to share.

Examples of some topics:

Heart Rate Variability Analysis, Thoracic Mobilization, and Autonomic Dysfunction

Pesky Patho PECs and Clinical Pearls for the Art of Inhibition and Facilitation

To join, email HeatherCarrDPT@gmail.com. She will then send you an invitation to accept. 

Posted May 28, 2014 at 8:04AM
Categories: Clinicians

Are you curious what books Ron has been reading lately? Well here they are! These are the most recent additions to his desk (and the PRI resource center). As you can tell by all the purple tabbed pages, the book he just finished is "It's a Jungle in There" by David A. Rosenbaum. Stay tuned for a short synopsis on this book next week!

Ron's May 2014 newly acquired books include:

  • It's a Jungle in There: How competition & cooperation in the brain shape the mind
  • Mindwise: How we understand what others think, believe, feel and want
  • Autonomic Neurology
  • Inheritance: How our genes change our lives and our lives change our genes
  • The Tale of The Dueling Neurosurgeons
  • Think: Why you should question everything

If you have read any good books recently, be sure to comment on  his story to let us know what books we should be getting next!

Posted May 23, 2014 at 8:57AM
Categories: Books

The Cantrell Center in Georgia is currently looking to hire a Licensed or License-Eligible Physical Therapist and Physical Therapist Assistant- new graduates welcome!  Mike Cantrell is a faculty member for the Postural Restoration Institute.  He is growing his staff and this opportunity is one that doesn’t come along often.  You can contact Mary Oakley PT, CHT at the Cantrell Center at vpop@cantrellcenter.com for more information.

Located in Warner Robins, Georgia, the Cantrell Center is located in the Middle of the state!  Just a quick drive to Atlanta or the beach, Warner Robins offers convenience to any interest without the crime rate and elevated costs of a larger city.  Visit the website of the Warner Robins Regional Chamber of Commerce for more information about the city of Warner Robins.

What makes The Cantrell Center a great place to work?

  • Outstanding Work Environment
  • Commitment to Clinical Excellence
  • Team Atmosphere
  • Ethical Standards & Values
  • Competitive Benefits Package
  • We have FUN!


As part of the Cantrell Center Team, you will collaborate with dedicated individuals while building your own career.  This is a place where each team member's gifts and experiences come together - creating an atmosphere of integrity, encouragement, and most of all - a place where patient care is paramount.  


To learn more about The Cantrell Center for Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine, visit our website (http://www.cantrellcenter.com/), find us on Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/cantrellcenter, or check us out on YouTube here or here.

Posted May 22, 2014 at 5:50AM

PRI once again made a debut in Poland with Myokinematic Restoration. This time in the town of Opole in south west (seen in the pictures). We had 27 professionals, and Postural Restoration was very well received. I plan to introduce the Postural Respiration course to this group later in the year.

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Posted May 21, 2014 at 2:00PM
Categories: Courses

We have added a Postural Respiration course on August 23-24th in Loveland, CO! I can only imagine Colorado will be as beautiful as this photo in late August. What a great way to cap off the summer with a PRI course in Colorado! If you are interested in attending this course, CLICK HERE to get registered today.

Posted May 16, 2014 at 12:15PM
Categories: Courses

Myokinematic Restoration originally scheduled in Spokane, WA, has been moved to Seattle, WA on May 31-June 1st! There are still a handful of seats available, so if you are in the Northwest, be sure to register soon. The early registration rate of $445 has been extended until next Wednesday, May 21st!


 

Posted May 15, 2014 at 1:53PM
Categories: Courses
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