Find a Course Near You

(Click Below)
reset AK GA HI CA OR WA ID NV AZ UT NM CO WY MT ND SD NE KS TX OK MN IA MO AR LA MS TN KY IL WI IN MI AL FL SC NC VA MD DE PA NJ NY ME VT NH MA RI CT OH WV

Upcoming Events

Image illustrating provider locations on a map of the united states

 

Find a Provider Near You

Find a Provider

Recent Posts

We are excited to announce and congratulate the Postural Restoration Certified (PRC) Class of 2019! PRC credentialing is the result of completing multiple advanced PRI courses, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the science through completion of the PRC application, and successfully participating in practical and analytical testing. This week, 14 clinicians earned the designation of Postural Restoration Certified (PRC) under the direction of Ron Hruska, Lori Thomsen, Jennifer Poulin, and Jennifer Platt earlier this week.

The Postural Restoration Institute established a certification process in 2004 as a way to recognize and identify those individuals with advanced training, extraordinary interest and devotion to the science of postural adaptations, asymmetrical patterns and the influence of polyarticular chains of muscles on the human body as defined by the Postural Restoration Institute. The PRC credentialing program is available to physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, occupational therapists, and chiropractors who have attended PRI courses, demonstrated a thorough understanding of the science through completion of the PRC application, and successfully participate in both clinical and analytical testing. To date, 215 professionals have earned the designation of Postural Restoration Certified (PRC).

To view/download the photos click here.

PRC Class of 2019; Certification; Postural Restoration Institute

Back Row (from L to R): Jennifer Poulin, Eric Ley, Craig Stasio, Brian Coleman, Samantha Red Anderson, Laura Mills, Noelle Ekonomou, Brent Henderly
Front Row (from L to R): Ron Hruska, Maureen Moore, Rachel Rand Smith, Valerie Chai, Lisa Simmons, Carol Jacobs, Kazufumi Nishimura, Michelin Carroll, Jennifer Platt, Lori Thomsen

Posted December 12, 2019 at 10:24AM by

It was a great weekend in New York teaching Pelvis Restoration. We had 48 clinicians attending the course and 13 were attending their first PRI Course….they made it! Pelvis entails positioning of the pelvic inlet and outlet coupled with muscles facilitation and inhibition with respiration. It’s a lot. I felt the class did an amazing job absorbing the material and asking wonderful questions. Edmund, Sebastian, and Romina your thinking and questioning benefiting the entire class, thank you. Frontal plane appreciation with synchronization of the respiratory and pelvic diaphragm were emphasized with demonstration. Nicole is your left ischial condylar adductor still burning? Geri, I hope you appreciated frontal plane of the left inlet and outlet to re-direct airflow into the right apical chest wall and left posterior mediastinum. Physical appreciation of PRI is powerful, thank you both for letting me teach throught you to the class. The weekend went way too fast, I appreciated everyone and their willingness to come and learn. Thank you Dave, Cuyler, and Brendan and Finish Line for hosting. Neal and Sean thank you for lab assisting! I was able to see the Rockettes in their annual Christmas show,  it was specatular!  Bucket List for me since I was young. Thank You again!

Posted November 27, 2019 at 11:41AM by
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

We had a huge turn-out in Minneapolis for the Postural Restoration Integration for Pilates course this weekend and attendees had fantastic questions!  We spent the morning of Day 1 nailing down breathing mechanics and  obtaining the Zone of Apposition and practicing it in lab even before lunch. We followed up by getting into the nitty gritty of the L AIC and R BC pattern and using the Reformer Supine Gait Integration Test and the Reformer Quadruped Abdominal Lateralization to test to see how well people could properly stand and shift over one leg and counter rotate the upper thorax ("legally"). We finished up day 1 with sagittal plane focused exercises.

 

On Day 2 we started with a heavy discussion on lateralized gait and understanding early-->mid stance and mid-->late stance in regards to the L AIC/R BC pattern. There may have been some dancing involved....like some sagittal pelvic tilts, frontal plane "hula hips" and transverse plane "salsa twists." Then we went through The Reformer Side lying Stance Test that really looks at the frontal plane followed by a lab of frontal plane exercises on the reformer. We finished up the day with talking about the principle of sensing, including cuing and special reference points for the hands and feet to promote L AF IR and R upper trunk rotation. The final lab added transverse plane integration including a personal favorite exercise of mine, scooter. We wrapped up the day having a frank logistical discussion on how does one start implementing these concepts without getting too overwhelmed, starting with getting a L ZOA and mastering the sagittal plane with a L hamstring. A big thank you to Kristin Procopio and Studio U, for hosting this rendition of our Pilates course at her beautiful new facility, and a shout out to Christine Peh who traveled all the way from Kuala Lumpur to be with us over the weekend!

Posted November 21, 2019 at 11:13AM by
Categories: Courses Clinicians Science

Getting to visit the beautiful state of Alaska is always a gift and if you haven’t been there before, you get a taste of the rugged and majestic way of life the minute you step off your plane at the airport. A beautiful bull moose graces the main hallway and a world record 459 lb. halibut graces the wall as you head down to get your luggage. Both of these beautiful creatures instantly remind me of trips I have taken to Alaska with my Dad and my son to catch salmon and halibut and to enjoy the great big Alaska outdoors. Great memories for me indeed.

Historically, my trips to Alaska began in 2011 when I traveled up to speak at the Alaska Physical Therapy Association annual conference at the Alyeska Ski Resort. Over 100 people listened to Myokinematic Restoration that day and the group struggled to appreciate the value of the science and to understand how the principles of PRI fit into what they “knew”. To be honest, we may not have had continued opportunities to grow PRI in Alaska were it not for one innovative pioneer who quietly sat in that class named Joy Backstrum, PT, PRC. Thank you Joy. Thank you for your patient, thoughtful, open-mindedness and for your commitment to be a mentor to your peers. Thank you for the difference your drive and persistence has made in so many lives from that first course until today. It was special to see the members of this Impingement and Instability class recognize that you are the reason they are able to be so far along in their PRI journey.

And thank you to the entire team at The Physical Therapy Place for being such great great hosts this weekend. You guys went out of your way to make sure I felt welcome and appreciated in every way. From making sure I had everything I needed to taking me to awesome Anchorage restaurants like Hearth Artisan Pizza and The Moose’s Tooth, you guys did it all.

This Impingement and Instability course went off quite well. We started the first day explaining how impingement and instability are actually good things, when seen in the proper context. Instability where you have previously experienced impingement and impingement where you have previously experienced instability are essential for the alternating reciprocal rhythm your autonomic nervous system seeks. Your sense of the floor and your sense of the PRI Reference Centers on both sides of your body help your autonomic nervous system appreciate this desirable rhythm.

Calcaneal instability, femoral instability, Ilial instability and scapular instability were all discussed in context with this desirable rhythm and variable autonomic function. When the body starts to look like a system where regions of the body rely on other regions of the body for what they need, then you can begin to move past introductory level PRI thinking into secondary and even advanced PRI thinking. This class is really fun to teach because it does such a good job bringing concepts together and it helps the course attendees advance to the next level without losing any fundamental components. If you haven’t taken Impingement and Instability in a while or at all, I hope you can join us for this innovative course in 2020. You’ll be glad you did.

Posted November 20, 2019 at 11:19AM by
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

In the later part of 2004 I met with Stan Babel through Karen Jiran MPT, PRC and Carrie Langer MPT, ATC, PRC. Stan who owned and managed Physical Medicine Diagnostics Rehabilitation (PD Midway) and wanted to build a pool. At that time I was really interested in hydrodynamics and had countless discussions with my brother who is an engineer regarding pump power, jet nozzles, etc. And more importantly I wanted to design a pool for patterned neuromuscular isolation and inhibition through the use of directional water to maximize specific aquatic afferentation, as well as compensatory push and pull recognized by the autonomic and central nervous systems. My first PRI Sequential Movement (PRISM) pool design was developed and constructed through Stan. All eight of the stations provide neuromuscular isolation and feed forward activation of groups of muscles to resolve postural related dysfunctional autonomic and physiologic behavior through the flow of water. With the arrival of this pool and its science, PDR Midway, became IMPACT Physical Medicine and Aquatic Center.


Presenting course material that is related to the brain’s lateralized hemispheric specialization and the autonomic nervous influence on our central nervous system’s compensatory behavior, fifteen years later, made my amygdala related emotional, sentimental and nostalgic feelings flow uncontrollably. Stan and his wonderful staff over the years has enabled me to continue to move in directions that I patiently outlined, ballooned and flowed with. I feel so indebted and grateful to him and his staffs over the years. Many of those affiliated with this integrated minded center were in this class.


This particular class also made me feel somewhat sentimental, because I have known most, if not all of them, for so many years. They were watched, observed, tested and judged by me. They were my independent, dependent and constant variables for my research effort on knowing when, how and what to deliver to get where we were on November 2nd, 2019. There were 18 Credentialed providers in the room that affectionately tolerated me being somewhat unfiltered regarding autonomic and central nervous systems and their influence on each other and our patterned behavior.  


This course is such a joy for me to teach and resonate around. Just as aquatic flow can re-balance, re-engage, and re-tense us, so can mandibular latero- molar trusive contact, sphenoid (pterygoid) and temporal (temporalis) oscillation, and palatopharyngeus  (diameter of the pharynx) and tensor veli palatine (diameter of the eustacian tube) ANS control. Before Stan, before the pools, before PRI certification, I remember a quote by Socrates that remains with me today. “I cannot teach anybody, I can only make them think” and I am grateful for those who continue to flow and follow thought processes that make them sequentially think.  

The staff at IMPACT are always such wonderful hosts. The morning breakfast, break food and afternoon warm cookies (thank you Stan) are so appreciated. Christie Amundson PT, DPT, HFS,PRC and Mara Brandsoy OTR/L, PRC have a system in place for courses like this. Their and their fellow team-mate’s effort does not go unnoticed.  I also want to thank Amy Pennaz PT and Catherine Shelton PT for their willingness to work with me in demonstrating how to resolve postural related dysfunctional autonomic behavior.

Posted November 19, 2019 at 4:03PM by
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

Products

Non-manual Techniques
Manual Techniques