Coronavirus / COVID 19 Update (Last Updated February 23, 2021):

We are closely monitoring information that is being released by the CDC, WHO, individual states' Department of Health & national and state government officials regarding the COVID-19 virus pandemic. For live courses that are confirmed over the next year, we have implemented new safety measures that will be in place for the health and safety of everyone attending.

*In 2021, all live stream courses will be held in Lincoln, NE and they will also have limited seating for live (in-person) attendees. At this time, the live (in-person) attendance is limited to 10 participants, with the exception of the Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium which will be limited to 25 participants.

We will make decisions regarding the cancellation of future live (in-person) courses no later than the 4 week deadline. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to us directly at 888-691-4583. We also have online home study courses available for all three primary courses and we have also added live stream courses. Live stream courses are limited to 100 attendees. Upcoming live stream courses include:

Occlusal Cervical Restoration - March 13-14th
Myokinematic Restoration - March 27-28th
Cranial Resolution - April 10-11th
Pelvis Restoration - April 17-18th
Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium - April 22-23rd
Postural Respiration - May 15-16th
Forward Locomotor Movement - May 22-23rd
Secondary & Tertiary Non-Manual Techniques Worskhop - June 4-5th

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Recent Posts

The updated 2021 Hruska Clinic Shoe list is out!!

Based on Postural Restoration® principles to guide our decision making these shoes are picked based on qualities that we feel may be beneficial to assist patients and clinicians narrow their choices for appropriate footwear. There are shoes not on this list that are going to be good shoes for some and not every shoe on this list is going to be good for everyone but this is a guide to help.

Listen to Lori describe the most recent updates to our list for 2021!

To get your copy of the list go to https://www.hruska-clinic.com/shoe-list/

Hope this helps you all #PRINation!

https://youtu.be/2KU7btdMfJs

Posted February 23, 2021 at 10:04AM by

There are four kinds of documentation that most of us use to change our behavior:  
1)  Learning oriented tutorials.
 2) Goal oriented how-to guides.
3) Understanding-orientated discussions.
4) And, information-oriented reference material.


Each of these four types of documentations usually have instances within the document that refers to related information elsewhere in the same document. This is important as it forms a network structure of relations that exist between different parts of data, dictionary-internal as well as dictionary-external. If the cross-reference mechanism is well designed, visibly or technically, the reader, and in this case, the course attendee, will be able to follow each and apply ‘cross-reference’ event, to the referenced content whether the content is presented visibly or technically.  


The last example, of the four listed above, enhances usability and application of content in each of the PRI Non-Manual Techniques. Documentation or description that identifies direct reference and referent sites of consistent interest; is required so documentation that indirectly implicates cross references from these and other discrete or unconsidered sites can provide content-strategies to meet the desired needs and expectations, from both the provider and the participant.


As the author of these techniques, and as the author of cross-referencing design associated with each technique, effort to ensure that location and content of the target of the cross-reference in each technique needs to be consistent, regardless of the aptness of the provider or the participant.  


These opportunities to provide my reasoning behind each of the techniques, that were selected by this course’s participants, are not exceeded in any other course offered in PRI. Therefore, the guidance I offer to answer questions on the ‘why’s, ‘when’s, ‘who’s and ‘what’s regarding each technique’s reference’s, referent’s, and cross-reference’s content, is an absolute unique opportunity for both the author and the attendee seeking behavior modification through documentation that is resourcefully dissected at a level that is unsurpassed in this Institute.  Each technique (documentation) dissection experience is truly one of the most rewarding things I have done in my life.  And I am grateful.

 
I want to thank Dan Houglum, Torin Berge, Dave Drummer, Jen, Hannah and RJ for their assistance in making this course so enjoyable to teach and apply to “real” life limitations and likenesses.

Posted February 4, 2021 at 10:18AM by
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

January 25th was recorded as the second highest daily snowfall in Lincoln of all time, dropping 14.8 inches of snow at a record rate. Between phone calls and emails while working from home, all of us at the Institute were busy “Digging Out”, while at the same time being driven further into a pattern. This same system (of snow) hit much of the Midwest by varying degrees, and many of you, like me, may be feeling the effects after hours spent pushing and plowing our entries back to the outside world. There are many considerations to keep in mind while performing any repetitive, patterned driven activity, and in respect to clearing snow, they are heightened by the exertion and work needed to move the literal mass in front of you. Any activity occurring “in front of you” poses challenges in itself because of the linear forward movement which is often repetitive. Many of these activities and considerations are highlighted in our “Restoring Alternation in Your Daily Lives” Patient Guide which was published last year.


When it comes to pushing snow, be mindful of the following.

When pushing snow on a flat surface, consider first your hand placement and center of mass, in relation to the mass being moved in front of you and the ground below you. The most natural position will be for you to instantly lower your right arm nearest to the blade of the shovel, and your left arm closer to your body. This will lead to your COM to shift over your right leg causing you to work through Right AF IR, Left Trunk Rotation, and Left AF ER positioning, while further driving your pattern.


Instead, consciously start by reversing the above position, lowering your left arm further down the shovel and placing your right arm nearest your body. This will allow your COM to shift to the left, leading to Left AF IR, Right Trunk Rotation, and Right AF ER positioning, while helping to minimize the above pattern. Over time it is likely that you will naturally re-adjust back to the first position as it is what your body is asymmetrically driven to. When possible alternate between these positions as much as possible to minimize some of the common aches and pains that occur from pushing snow in a patterned position!

Posted January 27, 2021 at 12:37PM by
Categories: Science

"The new normal."  That's a phrase we all have heard many times during the last 10 months. As we are all adjusting to what that phrase means to us individually on a personal level, all of us are adjusting to what that means with regards to our relationships with each other as well. We are all finding new boundaries, and freedoms, associated with this "new normal."  

PRI opened the 2021 year with the newly revamped Impingement and Instability course, which introduces the concept that impingement and instability are both necessary and vital for optimal human performance. They provide new boundaries and freedoms that allow us to be able to oscillate between our two hemispheres of our body and brain. Our body needs to find a "new normal" with these new parameters in order to appreciate the left side of our body and the right hemisphere of our brain. As I reminded the course attendees, the question isn't "are you going to get onto your left leg?", the question is "how are you going to get onto your left leg?"  

This upgraded course introduces the neuromechanical concepts to answer the question of "how", as this course serves as a gateway into the other PRI Secondary and Tertiary courses, such as Forward Locomotor Movement. This is the material Ron was looking to introduce 20 years ago, and it is my honor to be able to help provide the neurological answers to the question "how are you going to get onto your left leg?" As we discussed during the entirety of the weekend, the how is rooted in one's ability to compress, or impinge, certain areas of the body, and decompress, or destabilize, other areas of the body. In order for the brain to appreciate these novel concepts, we need to provide the cortex of the brain with novel reference centers for proper inhibition of functional cortical dominance.

As we embarked on our "new normal, " not only in 2021, but in our cerebral cortical function, this course has now become much less of the orthopedic course it had to be several years ago, but has progressed into the neuromechanical blueprint for behavior modification that Ron had intended from Day 1 of the Institute. This course has always been my personal favorite of all the PRI courses offered because it is a clinician's course as it provided me a more integrated manner to apply the information I had learned in the three PRI introductory courses. My appreciation for this course has grown dramatically due to the necessary evolution from an orthopedic delivery to a neuromechanical, cohesive, and expansive delivery of PRI concepts. As the attendees of the course can attest to, Impingement and Instability helps our body's ability to appreciate the "new normal" from the inside out.

Posted January 21, 2021 at 11:31AM by
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

We are excited to introduce and congratulate our Postural Restoration Trained (PRT) Class of 2021! PRT is the result of completing multiple advanced PRI courses, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the science through completion of the PRT application, and successfully participating in practical and analytical testing. This past weekend, five professionals earned the designation of Postural Restoration Trained (PRT) under the direction of Ron Hruska, Dan Houglum and Jennifer Platt.

The Postural Restoration Institute® established this credentialing process in 2011 as a way to recognize and identify individuals with advanced training, extraordinary interest and devotion to the science of postural adaptations, asymmetrical patterns and the influence of polyarticular chains of muscles on the human body as defined by the Postural Restoration Institute®. The PRT credential is available to Certified Athletic Trainers, Certified Athletic Therapists, Exercise Physiologists and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists who have completed the course requirements, application and testing process. With the addition of this class, there are now 59 PRT professionals throughout the U.S and Internationally.

To view/download the photos click here.

Back Row (L to R): Ron Hruska, Philip DeNigris, Jarrett Kolich, Dan Houglum;
Frong Row (L to R): Jennifer Platt, John "Amos" Mansfield, Diane Banderas, Yoshikatsu Abe

Posted January 13, 2021 at 12:34PM by

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