Community

Welcome to the Postural Restoration Community! This is where you will read the latest industry news, hear about upcoming events, find helpful deadline reminders, and view a plethora of additional resources regarding our techniques and curriculum. The great part about it is--not only can you can view the entries we post, you can also post about the things that matter to you. Did you find an interesting article about a technique you learned in one of your courses? Do you have a patient case study you want to share with other professionals? Simply click "Submit an Entry" and follow the easy steps towards getting your information published in the PRI Community!

Jason Masek presented at the 2018 National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Coach's Conference.  His presentation: "Push, Pull, and Propulsion: the 10-20-30-40 Concept" is now available online. Check out our blog for more information.

Posted December 6, 2018 at 4:27PM

We are sad to announce that Matt is leaving our office at the first of the year, and heading back to school full-time. Thus, we are seeking a Digital and Media Coordinator to support our successful team. The ideal candidate serves as a positive first point of contact for incoming calls, a true team player who communicates clearly and effectively in our fast-paced office. The perfect fit would be someone who knows who we are, and what we do, and therefore we are reaching out to #PRINation to see if you know of anyone who might be qualified and interested in this full-time position. An added bonus (but not a requirement) would be someone who has taken PRI courses, and would be able to assist with some of the clinical/practical application roles in our office, as well as the roles outlined below.

Qualifications & Responsibilities:

  • Knowledge of how to build/manage Wordpress and other CMS platforms, as well as basic knowledge of Wordpress plugins to maintain day-to-day operations with www.posturalrestoration.com; www.privideoforyou.com; and www.prihomestudy.com. 
  • General photo/video shooting and editing knowledge (use of programs similar to Lightroom, iMovie, Premiere).
  • Graphic design experience.
  • Proficiency in MS Word, Excel, Power Point, and Access, with excellent trouble-shooting abilities.
  • Provide excellent customer service in person, by phone and via email.
  • Accept and appropriately direct incoming calls and email inquiries.
  • Provide assistance with processing PRI product orders, course registrations and home studies.
  • Ability to prioritize directives from multiple individuals while effectively managing several projects.
  • Clinical/practical experience with Postural Restoration® is a plus!

If you or someone you know might be interested in this opportunity, please contact Jen. If are unsure whether you fit the qualifications, don’t hesitate to reach out, as we are generally interested in learning more and finding a great fit for our growing office.

Posted December 3, 2018 at 4:18PM

PRI Integration for Baseball (Glendale Arizona) - Camelback Ranch in Glendale Arizona was the site of this year's PRI Integration for Baseball course and it was a beautiful setting and a great course. Jimmy Southard, ATC was an excellent host. He took the extra time and energy to make sure everyone felt welcome and had everything they needed during both days of the course. I was grateful to have been able to co-teach this course again with Ben Hagar, PT, PRC. Ben is an excellent instructor that not only cares about getting it right, but makes sure questions are answered in such a way that course attendees get the most benefit from the discussion. We also appreciated having Kris Naig, PT, PRC with us to help out during lab as a lab assistant.

Roughly 1/3 of the class were first timers at a PRI course and I loved having the interaction with such a fresh group. First and foremost, we respect and appreciate that so many new professionals were willing to invest their time and resources into learning about the science of Postural Restoration. The first half of the first day was completely devoted to properly introducing fundamental principles and concepts to this new audience so we were all on the same page as we moved forward into the performance component of the material. We discussed human respiratory asymmetry, the patterns associated with this asymmetrical respiratory drive and how these patterns relate to phases in the gait cycle. We further discussed appropriate ways to minimize these patterns so movement pathways become unrestricted for baseball performance.

Then Ben moved the group into an interactive discussion around phases of early and late throwing mechanics, complete with a breakdown of slow motion video for each component of throwing. After bringing the group up to speed on the desired movement outcome for each phase of throwing, Ben was able to highlight compensatory movement tendencies for both right and left handed throwers because of the L AIC/R BC pattern. His mechanical breakdown of the throwing sequence was further expanded to include reciprocal movement assessment of the wrist, forearm, elbow and shoulder in three dimensions. These patterned considerations were also applied to early and late hitting mechanics to end the afternoon session on day 1.

Day 2 was all about thoracic performance, objective testing and treatments for Superior T4 Syndrome, a common presentation in baseball. I started the morning discussion with right vs left sided considerations for the abdominal wall, lower trapezius and serratus anterior. I also went into the rotational considerations across the axial skeleton for a R BC athlete vs a Superior T4 Syndrome athlete and discussed limitations with rotation commonly seen both before and after addressing the L AIC/R BC pattern. Ben then took over and guided the group through lecture and lab for the 3 baseball specific performance tests used in this course. It was nice to go through the testing process together in each of the lab groups and to take the time to analyze the testing results and to begin to make treatment decisions. He then took the testing information into a discussion of treatment and focused on the baseball athlete with Superior T4 Syndrome.

It was encouraging for the class to stay so focused on this particular category of rotational overhead athlete for a couple of reasons: First, because such a high percentage of baseball players develop Superior T4 Syndrome and second, because a full correction of Superior T4 Syndrome patterned and non-patterned rotational limitations corrects so many other things, for both right and left handed athletes. After learning and practicing these treatment techniques together in lab groups, Ben finished the second day outlining training considerations for both a right and left hander during stride to cocking and during acceleration to follow through. A welcome compliment to the detailed throwing analysis completed with all the slow motion video on day one. Overall, a great course with a great group of baseball professionals, that certainly helped all of us become better at what we seek to be good at.

Posted November 27, 2018 at 4:23PM
Categories: Courses

One 2 One Physical Therapy is Hiring!

Do you want to be a part of a professional family, with the potential to earn partnership, that cares about, supports, as well as challenges its members to co-evolve?  

We are looking for someone to join our family to co-create a one-of-a kind physical, mental, emotional and energetic healing space that will allow us and our patients to thrive.

Please go to One 2 One Physical Therapy for more information... thank you!

Posted November 21, 2018 at 2:36PM

Last weekend I enjoyed teaching Pelvis Restoration up in the Motor City. The class was hosted by the Detroit Medical Center and their staff were very accommodating and made me feel right at home. This class was a nice mix of rehab and strength and conditioning professionals. There were only 4 newbies and the rest of the class had taken PRI coursework. This always makes for a fun class with lots of integration between the respiratory and pelvic diaphragms as it relates to gait and breathing. On Sunday, we mixed it up a bit, as it was my last class of 2018. The group widely understood my L AIC “Mustang Sally” analogy. It was quite fitting as I awoke to some snow on Sunday! Brrr… it was cold up North this past weekend. My VT Yankee blood has definitely thinned! We discussed how our patients and athletes are born into a LAIC pattern and compensate with their backs to override the pattern. This led to my PEC snowstorm on the Mustang Sally asymmetrical pattern.

We began our treatment algorithms discussing the Patho PEC pattern management and related that compensation to a Winter Snow storm on top of our Mustang Sally. We reviewed the 3 signs of pathology and how these patients will maximize end range and stabilize on their joints vs. good muscle control. A lot of time and discussion was spent on the importance of securing inlet extension with IOs and TAs and inhibiting back extensors before moving into L AIC clinical efforts. Once we brushed off the compensations of the Patho PEC and PEC, we got down to business to review the RAIC treatment plan. This switch in presenting the material was appreciated as a lot of our Pelvis patients are in a PEC pattern and lack frontal plane control.

Craig Stasio, PT from Simio Physical Therapy, assisted me. Thanks to Nick Jensen ATC from the Atlanta Braves for enduring my Right Iliacus emphasis and Mary Ann’s early question regarding respiration and the Pelvic Diaphragm. I look forward to taking a little break over Thanksgiving and seeing everyone in Lincoln for Advanced Integration in December!

Posted November 14, 2018 at 4:28PM
Categories: Courses

It was an honor to spend Veteran's Day Weekend with a fantastic group of movement professionals. On Sunday November 11, the 100 year anniversary of the end of WW I, we took a moment to honor those who have served our country.

With the sounds of the Veteran's Day Parade outside, we spent most of our Sunday in lab. We were fortunate to have a large group of attendees, roughly half of whom had not been a PRI class before. We had the time to do a repositioning lab, spend over two hours on the Hruska Adduction and Abduction Lift tests in detail, and then follow that up with another lengthy lab of progressing through PRI non-manual activities. Not often do we have the opportunity to have so much lab time, and then carve out some time to discuss and demonstrate how to get an individual from a PEC pattern into a L AIC pattern, for those who were new to PRI.

My great thanks to my lab assistants, Neal Hallinan, PRT, and Sean Light, PRT, who were invaluable with such a large group. I would also like to thank Damian Estrada, Yelena Gremban, Matthew Zimmerman, Tara Lewis, and Beth Lewis for their questions, re-states, and volunteering during our lab demonstrations.

We were able to navigate our way through normal and pathological mechanics, the myokinematic ramifications of being stuck in a L AIC pattern, and we were able to progress into assessment of patterns and pathology of patterning. Which allowed us to spend as much time as we did to the Hruska Abduction and Adduction Lift tests and non-manual activities.

Yes, neurology is a complicated topic. And understanding the link between the hamstring and the parasympathetic nervous system is an enormous paradigm shift. I appreciate and empathize with the difficulty that concept presents, particularly to those who have been trained in this wonderful country of ours. However, I would encourage those who are new to PRI to not completely dismiss this concept because it challenged your preconceived notion of neurology and muscular behavior. Thank you for such a memorable conclusion of my 2018 teaching calendar.

I am already looking forward to 2019!

Posted November 14, 2018 at 11:56AM
Categories: Courses

Impingement and Instability (Lima, Ohio)- Enjoyed my first trip to the historic city of Lima in Northwest Ohio and it was a fun interesting weekend. Thank you to Alex Maag, DPT, PRC for your generosity as our host site coordinator and to the entire Lima Memorial Hospital rehab team for making the visit such a nice one.

I learned some cool things about Lima Ohio, before even getting there. Several people who knew I was going to Lima had the same question for me, "while you are there, are you gonna go to Kewpee Burger?" I didn't know much about it, but enough people asked me about it and shared their enthusiasm for the place, I knew I had to visit the historic burger joint while in town (twice :). I learned the small burger chain began in Flint Michigan in 1923 and it was named after the Kewpee Doll, originally being called the "Kewpee Motel Hamburg". The burgers were square and tasted a lot like a Wendy's hamburger and they were offered with chocolate shakes that tasted a lot like a Wendy's Frosty. C'mon Dave Thomas (headquartered in nearby Columbus), come clean and acknowledge that your great idea for a burger chain may not have been that original. And to Kewpee Burger, thank you for all the great innovative ideas and for your tasty offerings.

 Impingement and Instability, ... speaking of innovative ideas and useful offerings. In this case the innovation and usefulness was designed for the world of rehabilitation and performance medicine. I have been grateful to Ron Hruska for putting this body of work together since i first had exposure to the material back in 2004 (the first formal I & I course was actually taught in 2007) and I appreciate the honor he has given me to teach it. It is the course that keeps on giving. I have attended and taught this course more than probably anybody else, except maybe Mike Cantrell, MPT, PRC and I learn something new each time I teach it. I can't believe how truly innovative this material was 14 years ago when I was first exposed to it and it continues to challenge and impress me to this day.

The course is all about neurological awareness and sense of three things: 1) breath, 2) body position and 3) upright frontal plane control of center of gravity in space. When you lose these senses and/or the neurological awareness of these senses, instability can emerge in several different areas. This course goes over the neurological reference centers needed to minimize instability at the calcaneus, femur, ilium and scapula. The course then goes on to provide treatment recommendations for stabilization of the foot and ankle, tibia, femur, ilium and scapula, designed to be superimposed on top of the good preliminary work of AF and TS repositioning and stabilization, learned in PRI's introductory courses. Thank you Ron for an awesome body of work that continues to challenge and inspire.

Posted November 13, 2018 at 3:08PM
Categories: Courses

Diakadi Fitness located in the City by The Bay, San Francisco hosted its first PRI course this past weekend. Attendees came from as far away as Japan and Ottawa, Canada and represented a wide range of professions including physical therapy, chiropractic, dentistry, athletic training, strength and conditioning and massage therapy. Over 2/3 of the class were first time attendees to a PRI course with many in attendance their first time taking Postural Respiration. The shift in thinking from a more traditional orthopedic approach to concepts like lateralization, balancing asymmetries, neutrality, stabilization vs. motion control, the effect of the diaphragm on the direction a pelvis will turn with ribcage kinematic influence on spinal rotation and how to test and treat via PRI principles was profound for the group. As always, pathomechanical compensations for breathing defined by Superior T-4 syndrome were discussed in detail and presented a new "paradigm" or way of observing and thinking how reliance on accessory muscles can create dysfunctional patterns of breathing and movement. One new attendee volunteered and briefly discussed the effects that PTSD can have creating a sympathetic response affecting every system in the body. He was in the military for four years then a firefighter/paramedic for six years and the lesson is each person brings a unique history with them into our clinics. In addition, he grinds his teeth at night so integration with other health professionals is always a must when needed. Thanks to Caleb Chiu and Joe Cincinelli for lab assisting and Tiana and Andrea for helping with sign ups and hosting duties!

Posted November 7, 2018 at 4:55PM
Categories: Courses

We are so excited to announce the agenda and speakers for our 2019 Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium, titled "Airway Oscillation: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Production of Voice, Airflow, and Resonance". The 11th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium will be held in Lincoln, NE on April 11-12, 2019.

The speaker line up and two day agenda are outlined below. To learn more about the course (including description and objectives), and to register online, CLICK HERE. Don't wait to sign up, this one is sure to fill up!

Speakers:
Ron Hruska, MPA, PT
Dr. Rosalba Courtney, ND, DO, PhD
Dr. Brad Story, PhD
Ruth Hennessy, MM, Indiana University
Mandy Harvey, America's Got Talent Season 12 Finalist
Dr. Howard Hindin, DDS
Dr. Ingo Titze, PhD

Posted November 7, 2018 at 11:55AM
Categories: Courses

Recently returned from the greater Chicago area for Pelvis Restoration at The Trainers Club where I was welcomed by Wynne Conklin. Fellow PRC and faculty member Dan Houglum served as our lab assistant for the course and my stay at the Houglum Hotel was first class by any measure, as was his presence at the course. Newcomers, many who were mid-stream with introductory courses and a couple savvy vets who'd been to many secondary courses were dialed for a PRI steak of a course.

As is generally the case, the pelvis restoration discussion was one of integrating pelvic and thoracic diaphragms with great discussion about how to implement with athletes of all ages and capacities. Many thanks to Eric Hrycko for his willingness and outright enjoyment of lab demonstrations as well as the many others who contributed during lab demonstration and discussion of PEC and Left AIC underlying neuromechanical patterns that elicit compensations of immensely varying sorts.

We discussed how to best address the "big ones" first in terms of identifying inhibition strategies after identifying potential treatment options via administering PRI special tests. This group was particularly effective and variable in lab, showcasing a broad array of normal pelvis asymmetries that allowed a thorough and comprehensive lab demonstration that is not always possible at every course. Literally the entire group participated in discussions and/or lab on at least one occasion during this course--awesome. Thank you all for being such involved students of this fine science!

Thanks again Dan and Wynne for taking the time and expending the energy to ensure that this was a great environment to take in the science of Pelvis Integration! Thoroughly enjoyed Pelvis Restoration Chi-town!

Posted November 5, 2018 at 10:13AM
Categories: Courses
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