Find a Course Near You

(Click Below)
reset AK GA HI CA OR WA ID NV AZ UT NM CO WY MT ND SD NE KS TX OK MN IA MO AR LA MS TN KY IL WI IN MI AL FL SC NC VA MD DE PA NJ NY ME VT NH MA RI CT OH WV

Upcoming Events

Image illustrating provider locations on a map of the united states

 

Find a Provider Near You

Find a Provider

Recent Posts

The Hruska Clinic and our PRIME team are proud to officially announce the addition of Megan King to our PRIME program as our dedicated PRIME patient care coordinator.  She is a valuable resource for our program to assist in coordinating patients coming into the program.  Her background professionally and personally makes her a great asset to our team!  If you have any questions about PRIME and how we can help you with multidisciplinary engagement in Lincoln, Nebraska she would love to talk to you at our new dedicated PRIME phone number 402-975-8533.  She can also be reached at primengagement@gmail.com or feel free to check our new website at www.primengagement.com.  For those who have worked with Stacy Masek in the past she still part of our team and is now the primary contact for PRI Vision and can still be reached at privisioncenters@gmail.com or at 402-261-6793.

Posted January 19, 2017 at 9:46AM by
Posted January 19, 2017 at 9:33AM by

Management of position, posture and weight distribution are key elements to skiing.  In the “pattern”, our weight is over the right leg driven in part by a dominate right antero-lateral abdominal wall.  This works in our favor with a left turn.  The pelvis is oriented to the right, we have Right AFIR, right shoulder is down with left trunk rotation and a right arm forward. 

Weight distribution over the right ski, or downhill ski, in a left turn is pretty important especially with the ability to adduct and internally rotate on the right.  The inside portion of the ski, or the inside edge, is necessary so that we don’t slide or fall straight down the hill.  This is called edge control and the ability to evert the downhill ski while we invert the uphill ski gives us direction and control. This is also called a parallel turn.

 The ankles in a ski boot are fixed and move very little so frontal plane control has got to come from the hips and knees.  But the feet and ankles have an important role with sensing the ground and signaling the brain and rest of the kinetic chain the position of the skis and helping to control shifting of weight side to side, forward and backwards. 

Tri-planer thinking starts with sagittal plane and having a neutral pelvis is necessary to transfer load from right to left side, left turn to right turn.  Without sagittal plane control and maintaining it, frontal plane control will suffer since adducting a femur then internally rotating it will be limited at best. Without sagittal and frontal plane management, a ZOA on the left will also be compromised and limit the ability to turn a pelvis to the left to stay effectively in left stance with right trunk counter rotation.  As a side note, this directional separation of pelvis and rib cage is another critical component to performance. Trying to teach someone to just “get better” at right turns without a tri-planer position awareness will be a limiting factor at best.      

Posted January 13, 2017 at 10:25AM by

We are excited to announce and congratulate the Postural Restoration Trained (PRT) Class of 2017!  PRT is the result of completing multiple advanced PRI courses, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the science through completion of the PRT application, and successfully participating in practical and analytical testing. Eight individuals earned the designation of Postural Restoration Trained (PRT) under the direction of Ron Hruska, Neil Rampe and Jennifer Platt.

The Postural Restoration Institute® established this credentialing process in 2011 as a way to recognize and identify individuals with advanced training, extraordinary interest and devotion to the science of postural adaptations, asymmetrical patterns and the influence of polyarticular chains of muscles on the human body as defined by the Postural Restoration Institute®.  The PRT credential is available to Certified Athletic Trainers, Certified Athletic Therapists and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists who have completed the course requirements, application and testing process. With the addition of this class, there are now 41 PRT professionals throughout the U.S.

PRT credentialed athletic trainers and strength and conditioning specialists offer a unique approach to physical medicine and fitness called Postural Restoration. This approach addresses underlying biomechanics which can often lead to symptoms of pain and dysfunction. All mechanical influences on the body that restrict movement and contribute to improper joint and muscle position are considered, examined, and assessed. Techniques are utilized to restore proper alignment of the body while proper respiratory dynamics are considered. Management encompasses prevention and lifetime integration for long-term successful outcomes.

Congratulations!

Pictured from left to right: (Back Row) Ron Hruska, Neal Hallinan, Taylor Lewis, Michael Schofield, Yusuke Nejo, Neal Rampe (Front Row) Jeffrey Eckhouse, Elizabeth Kais, Anne Bradley, Miguel Aragoncillo

Click here to view more photos.

Posted January 12, 2017 at 3:14PM by

Dominant neurologic patterns and natural human asymmetries drive every form of breathing, position and movement.  The inability to manage patterns, asymmetries and breathing shows up in performance from simply walking to every sport or physical activity. 

Skiing is no exception and it is especially true with the ability to ski-turn to the right as well as to the left.  Ask most skiers which turn is easier and invariably they will mention their left turn going downhill is easier that their right.  Knowing the PRI definition of “AFIR” and “AFER” can help even the non-skier understand the mechanics and problems facing a skier attempting to get into left stance or Left AFIR as well as their right stance or Right AFIR.

For most people in the “pattern” (Left AIC, Right BC), they get into Right AFIR more easily than their left.  They can get so good at it that they are stuck in it.  For some in what we refer to a PEC pattern, they really don’t do right or left stance very well but they tend towards right stance easier.

The point is to do both well especially on the left and that means getting the socket over the ball (acetabulum over femur) as well as the femur turning internally in the socket (femur under socket).

For an effective right turn, the pelvis has to orient from the right to the left for Left AFIR.  Being able to position a left inominate bone from flexion towards extension into neutral is the job of the left hamstring and glute.  Then having the ability to put that ball joint into the socket depends on an anterior lateral abdominal wall, an anterior glute medius and a distal left adductor that has an internal rotation component to it. 

None of this will happen without getting a hemi-diaphragm to “dome” or create a “Zone of Apposition” (ZOA) and help to inhibit a left psoas muscle that contributes to the inability to put the pelvis in a position so a femur can adduct.  With sport performance, not only do both femurs need to be able to adduct in stance phase, but they need to be able to adduct with strength and power.

Adduction of a femur is critical for a ski turn along with internal rotation of a femur driving the knee medially for frontal plane control of the “inside edge” of the ski, left and right side, but especially left since this is the side most of us have difficulty with.  Many skiers are great compensators, like many athletes, and they find a way to have decent turns to the right even without the ability to adduct or get into Left AFIR fully.  But this comes at a cost with extension of a spine and compensatory torque into a knee that often can lead to reliance of end ranges for stability. 

Skiing, like walking, requires that our brains sense the ground or in this case the snow under a ski.  Getting into left stance is critical for this process proprioceptively so the brain can trust being on the left side for a right turn.  Without the ability to get into Left AFIR, dominate patterns will prevail and most skiers will fight with a right turn to some degree regardless of their ability. 

         

Posted January 10, 2017 at 9:58AM by

Products

CD Bundles
Non-manual Techniques CDs
Manual Techniques DVD
Manual Techniques DVD
Illustrations
Illustrations

PRI Vision

PRI Vision is a powerful new health care model that is a result of the integration or 'fusion' of the professions of physical therapy and behavioral/neuro-optometry. To register for PRI Vision courses, click here!