A PRI course attendee, Lilla Marhefka sent me this recent article on the right diaphragm function in subjects experiencing chronic low back pain with structural spine disorders and in those who have no history of low back pain or structural disorders (control group). Diaphragm motion and shape was recorded from MRI recordings when postural demands on the body were increased (hip flexion demands were increased). A statistical analysis showed that the diaphragm respiratory and postural changes were significantly slower, bigger in size and better balanced in the control group.  When a load was applied to the lower limbs, the pathological subjects were mostly not able to maintain the respiratory diaphragm function, which was lowered significantly. Subjects from the control group showed more stable parameters of both respiratory and postural function. In their conclusion, the researchers state that the facts also support the ability of the diaphragm to play a key role in maintaining the good stability of the trunk. It is also important that they were able to separate the phases of diaphragm movement.  Postural motions of the diaphragm could predict dispositions to vertebrogenic problems or could help when seeking to correct these problems. This is an excellent research study that supports PRI philosophy and principles. Thank you Lilla!