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Impingement & Instability - Anchorage, AK - Course in Review

Getting to visit the beautiful state of Alaska is always a gift and if you haven’t been there before, you get a taste of the rugged and majestic way of life the minute you step off your plane at the airport. A beautiful bull moose graces the main hallway and a world record 459 lb. halibut graces the wall as you head down to get your luggage. Both of these beautiful creatures instantly remind me of trips I have taken to Alaska with my Dad and my son to catch salmon and halibut and to enjoy the great big Alaska outdoors. Great memories for me indeed.

Historically, my trips to Alaska began in 2011 when I traveled up to speak at the Alaska Physical Therapy Association annual conference at the Alyeska Ski Resort. Over 100 people listened to Myokinematic Restoration that day and the group struggled to appreciate the value of the science and to understand how the principles of PRI fit into what they “knew”. To be honest, we may not have had continued opportunities to grow PRI in Alaska were it not for one innovative pioneer who quietly sat in that class named Joy Backstrum, PT, PRC. Thank you Joy. Thank you for your patient, thoughtful, open-mindedness and for your commitment to be a mentor to your peers. Thank you for the difference your drive and persistence has made in so many lives from that first course until today. It was special to see the members of this Impingement and Instability class recognize that you are the reason they are able to be so far along in their PRI journey.

And thank you to the entire team at The Physical Therapy Place for being such great great hosts this weekend. You guys went out of your way to make sure I felt welcome and appreciated in every way. From making sure I had everything I needed to taking me to awesome Anchorage restaurants like Hearth Artisan Pizza and The Moose’s Tooth, you guys did it all.

This Impingement and Instability course went off quite well. We started the first day explaining how impingement and instability are actually good things, when seen in the proper context. Instability where you have previously experienced impingement and impingement where you have previously experienced instability are essential for the alternating reciprocal rhythm your autonomic nervous system seeks. Your sense of the floor and your sense of the PRI Reference Centers on both sides of your body help your autonomic nervous system appreciate this desirable rhythm.

Calcaneal instability, femoral instability, Ilial instability and scapular instability were all discussed in context with this desirable rhythm and variable autonomic function. When the body starts to look like a system where regions of the body rely on other regions of the body for what they need, then you can begin to move past introductory level PRI thinking into secondary and even advanced PRI thinking. This class is really fun to teach because it does such a good job bringing concepts together and it helps the course attendees advance to the next level without losing any fundamental components. If you haven’t taken Impingement and Instability in a while or at all, I hope you can join us for this innovative course in 2020. You’ll be glad you did.

Posted November 20, 2019 at 5:19PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

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