Clinicians

Written by:  Adrian Baker, DPT, PRC | Posted by: Jen Zamora

On December 2, 2014, I had the pleasure of attending and assisting the Cantrell Center in hosting a Volleyball Symposium to the members and parents of the Central Georgia Volleyball Association (CGVA).  Mike Cantrell, MPT, PRC, spoke about the vital role that biomechanics play in injury prevention and attaining peak performance. The speech was packed with the basic PRI principles as well as a few Cantrellisms we have all grown to enjoy.  Mike was able to educate our local volleyball players on lateralized functional behaviors.  Through a series of pictures and demonstrations, he was able to teach the volleyball community that not only can we predict and test these asymmetries, but that we can also improve them with a Postural Restoration Program.  After neutralizing the dominant chains of muscle, we work toward acquiring reciprocal and alternating movement of the pelvis, rib cage, neck, and head in all three planes.  This type of movement will increase speed, stamina, and overall athletic performance AND help prevent injuries.

We left the athletes with a list of the “Top 5 Recommendations for Volleyball Players”

1. Be able to fully squat

2. Stand frequently with weight over your LEFT leg

3. DO NOT overstretch your LEFT hamstring

4. Be able to blow up a balloon CORRECTLY

5. Wear supportive shoes

We had an excellent time with an engaged audience.  We are doing another symposium on January 27th for the Perry High School Soccer Team!  See you there or read about it here!!

Adrian Baker, DPT, PRC

Posted December 24, 2014 at 10:37AM
Categories: Athletics Clinicians

Vermont Physical Therapy is seeking a full-time, PRI-educated Physical Therapist to work in our outpatient, private practice located inside the Burlington YMCA. Our therapists are dedicated to quality one-on-one care for every patient. We take an innovative whole body approach focusing not only on the patient’s physical condition, but also on the patient’s mental health, nutrition, and lifestyle. Our therapists specialize in aquatic therapy, custom orthotic fittings, balance and gait training. Ideal candidate would be independent, flexible, and innovative in their treatment approach. Strong interpersonal skills are a must.  Minimum 5 years experience preferred. 

For more information, please contact Chad Rainey, PT, PRC at chad@vtphysicaltherapy.com or (802) 497-0736.

Posted December 18, 2014 at 9:34PM
Categories: Clinicians

Joe Heiler from SportsRehabExpert.com recently featured Mike Cantrell in an audio interview on his website discussing the PRI MyoKinematic Restoration course plus answers some frequently asked questions about the PRI model, hip asymmetries that don't seem to fit a pattern, scoliosis, using a balloon to improve breathing, what type of 90/90 hip lift to use, and a whole lot more. Joe gave us permission to include the MP3 audio file on our website, so CLICK HERE to listen to the hour long interview with Mike!

Also, if you haven't already checked out SportsRehabExpert.com, it is definitely an excellent resource and PRI topics are commonly discussed on this site. Several other interviews have been conducted with Ron Hruska, Julie Blandin, Kevin Neeld, Michael Mullin, Neil Rampe and others discussing PRI in their respective fields! Check it out, if you haven't already!

 

Posted November 21, 2014 at 3:47PM

I recently did an interview with FitCast Podcast where I went over some of the concepts of the Postural Restoration Institute, breathing mechanics and applications. It is about 60 minutes long and is available as a FREE download.  The podcast can be accessed here:  http://thefitcast.com/episode-312-intro-to-pri-w-michael-mullin. Enjoy!

Posted November 8, 2014 at 12:40PM

The new Hamstring Protonic System (Protonics X1 System) is now available for purchase online. For those who might not be familiar with the Hamstring Protonic System, it was originally developed and patented by Ron Hruska in 1995 and has been used by clinicians for many years in treatment of patello-femoral pain, SI joint pain and many other symptoms related to the Left AIC pattern. Click here to access more information written by Ron Hruska on when a Hamstring Protonic System might be recommended.

PRC therapist Lisa Bartels recently submitted a letter with us sharing her excitement for the return of the Hamstring Protonic System as well as more information. There is also a special discounted program being offered for Postural Restoration Certified (PRC) and Postural Restoration Trained (PRT) professionals. 

Click here for more information or to order your new Hamstring Protonic System (Protonics X1 System)!

Posted October 7, 2014 at 7:38PM

Colorado PRI meet up! Join fellow PRI addicts for our quarterly Colorado gathering. Lisa Kelly PT, PRC will review the recent vision course and Craig Depperschmidt PT, PRC and Scott Kosola PT, PRC will reveiw manual techniques and when to use them. There should be plenty of time for discussion as well. 9a.m.- Noon on Saturday, October 25th at Rebound Sports and Physical Therapy in Fort Collins. Address is 2211 S College Ave #300, Fort Collins, CO 80525. Email Craig at craig.depperschmidt@reboundsportspt.com with any questions.  

Posted October 3, 2014 at 4:14PM
Categories: Clinicians

Last month, Ron Hruska was interviewed by a physical therpaist colleague, Paul Potter, and the podcast interview is now available online. To listen to Ron's input on "Three Keys to Creating Your Dream Practice", CLICK HERE! You can also download the podcast on iTunes as well.

Posted September 29, 2014 at 7:02PM
Categories: Interviews Clinicians

There is now a PRI Book Club!

The Postural Restoration Google Group will be discussing Right Hand, Left Hand: The Origins of Asymmetry in Brains, Bodies, Atoms and Cultures by Chris McManus starting on Nov 3, 2014. In order to take part in the fun you must join our google group. The Postural Restoration Google Group is a great forum for PRI practitioners to discuss challenging cases, share important research articles, and simply discuss any topic that is PRI related. 

To become a member please send an email to HeatherCarrDPT@gmail.com and she will send you an invitation to join.

Posted August 20, 2014 at 5:12PM
Categories: Books Clinicians

I continue to dive deeper into the physiology, anatomy, and biomechanics of both horse and rider, in a passionate effort to understand how 2 asymmetrical beings come together to produce fluid, balanced, floating movement in the world of equestrian disciplines. This is a rather lofty goal I have set for myself, because this type of movement is rarely achieved, EVEN at the elite levels of Dressage. CLICK HERE to read more!

Hello triplanar thinkers!

For those wondering, the picture is relevant because it shows a technique not often considered for the condition treated:  keeping a severed hand alive by grafting it to the patient’s ankle, then later replanting the hand back on his arm. 

The conclusion of my story about Don didn’t involve any external fixators, but the treatment that he needed might surprise some of you.  To review, Don was the patient with left shoulder bicipital tendinosis whom I treated in part I (link) with the “gold standard” conservative orthopedic approach and part II (link) with the according postoperative approach as a good therapist has been trained to.  As mentioned, I outline this case to review the path that is so very accepted and yet, in my experience since I began training with PRI, not the most effective.  Don’s story concludes below:

Don returned to clinic 8 months after discharge with a new diagnosis of left shoulder pain with the remarks on the script “MRI negative” and “eval and treat.”  This is generally understood as physician lingo for “I have no idea what to do now…good luck with all that.” 

Upon evaluation, Don reported that these left shoulder symptoms started about 2-3 months after we discharged him from PT intervention in spite of his persistence with his HEP and “it was all back to the starting point three months later.”  He still tested as a bilateral brachial chain patient with a PEC pattern, again was positive with impingement tests—Hawkins-kennedy, empty can, Neer sign.  He was frustrated, unable to work in his wood shop or play his accordion for more than 10 minutes without severe pain.  At this point, the patient and I discussed that fact that I had let him down to a degree because I wanted to take a different approach before surgery, but didn’t want to irritate Don or his referral source.  He understood, accepted my apology and we moved forward.

During the first 3 visits, we established that his bilateral brachial chain pattern and according left shoulder dysfunction was not the root of his dysfunction, but rather the manifestation of a “bottom up” pelvis patient whose primary difficulty was in maintaining frontal plane position of his pelvis. 

The key to Don’s left shoulder function?  Right posterior inlet inhibition of his pelvis.  During the seven visits we treated Don using a PRI approach after the gold standard of orthopedic medicine and orthopedic physical therapy had failed to maintain his shoulder function for more than 3 months, his symptoms resolved.  He left the clinic a reciprocal, alternating, smiling woodshop athlete with bilateral HADLT tests of 4/5 at 72 years of age, “tickled” that he could play his accordion as long as he wanted without pain for the first time since before he first went to see the doctor more than two years prior.  Don is in occasional contact for the past 6 months with no return of symptoms, lots of activity and happy thoughts. 

Six-month follow-up with no return of symptoms after the rest of my conservative clinical skills, an appropriate surgery and present day gold-standard postoperative care was unsuccessful.  These are the types of outcomes that keep my passion for this science alive and accelerating.  Moreover, these are the types of patient successes that remind me to be gentle but bold about intervention that I know clinically to be the most effective tool I have in the entire tool chest.

Clearly, each patient is different, and no, I have not seen a consistent correlation over time between the diagnosis of left shoulder bicipital tendinosis and the need for right posterior inlet inhibition.  The objective tests guided me to find the appropriate treatment, not my innate ability to hear the pelvis or shoulder speak to me. 

The point here is not to create a case study for anyone to memorize to use in the future for that one seemingly random patient.  Rather, I hope that the take home is that there is a chance that this gentleman didn’t need as much intervention as he ended up having.  And, even in the face of the “old school” telling you exactly what they want from PT intervention, the risk is worth the reward if one can just take the first three or four visits to break down barriers to a different way of approaching an age-old mechanical dysfunction of a “shoulder.”

Thank you for reading, perhaps you can save a few visits for a few of your patients by way of my experience with Don.   My best to you!

Jess

Posted July 13, 2014 at 3:03PM
Categories: Clinicians
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