Clinicians

We all know someone who experience difficulties with simple movements and at the same time can move or carry out, what appears to be more complex movements easily. This phenomenon of ‘Kinesia Paradoxa’ is one that is often seen with individuals who have been diagnosed with a basal ganglia disease called Parkinson’s Disease. However, by studying basal ganglia diseases we can learn so much about the precursors and the stages of this disease and its developmental patterns and symptomology. I believe, I have been on a journey of researching coupling and identifying similarities in people who have oscillator conflict at the caudate nucleus and putamen or dorsal striatum, at the subthalamic nucleus, at the globus pallidus, and at the substantial nigra pars reticulata, and didn’t really know it. For this is where the majority of our paradoxical function really begins, is initiated and looped. For these are the areas that make up the basal ganglia. Ganglia that reflect the parts of the brain that are not often even thought about, when sequencing steps in a “exercise”, or movement technique.

I always enjoy the amount of time, energy, thought and ideas that go into these PRI Symposiums. Ideas, that flow far in advance of the actual delivery of material and madness. I love every moment of these preparatory mental madness moments. Because that is what is exactly going on in our basal ganglia. Frenzied, chaotic, pandemonium mayhem, that can lead to periods of deranged decisions or a flow of indiscreet ideas. It’s the latter that we would never experience if we were controlled by frequencies of neuro-synapses that didn’t loop with other unfamiliar neuroreceptors, once in a while; like every 10 milliseconds.

Ron Hruska, Basal Ganglia Disease, Annual Symposium, Parkinson's Disease

Click HERE to view the full photo album.

There is a fine line between sanity and conflict. I personally need both in my life, and I am fairly certain you do too. Jennifer Smart DPT, PRC, Neal Hallinan CSCS, LMT, PRT and myself put a manual together, delivered content, and digressed into areas that reflect ideology of some of our most important ganglia we have. We enjoyed the time together in this presentation of ideas, in the preparation of ideas, and in the exchange of ideas that will hopefully strengthen the balance of movement associated with asymmetrical sanity and movement associated with symmetrical conflict. We, the speakers, learned so much from each other and the science that actually does support our zaniness and Zen-like ideas, all because of our respect for life’s paradoxes.

Here are a few of the comments we received from the class participants/attendees:

“Yes the material outlined "bigger picture" neurological influences on all humans that manifest as pathology in some. All people will benefit from this mindset of looking at human neurological function.”

“Love that these symposiums build on prior knowledge and become useful not as cookbook ways of treating patients but as ways to understand human behavior and provide frameworks to improve outcomes for all humans.”

“It brought the new perspective in how I look at Parkinsons and how big Inhibition is!”

“Just one fun thing. I was talking to my almost 91 year old mother who now uses a Rollator and she was asking about a stand up walker the night the course ended. Her next statement was funny (no knowledge of the course) and she said that the main thing she missed in her walking was "swinging her arms". I went down and worked with her with swinging hiking sticks in her hands (except I was using 2 reachers) and progressed her to using a trowel and hand clippers and she walked about 60 feet 4 times (back and forth in her driveway) unassisted and non stop. Cannot express how much fun it was to give her some freedom (she still loves to garden). Thank you all for a fantastic event as always. It is great to be able to go back an implement changes in my patients.”

“It felt balanced between the three presenters. I felt that Jennifer utilized her time the best, she did a good job of communicating her work, her experience, research, and I am grateful for her efforts. All presenters did an excellent job. Ron helped me to appreciate the basal ganglia, I really had never thought about this part of the brain in my day to day life and now it is imprinted. Neal was very engaging and enthusiastic, His passion moved me to appreciate dance and rhythm in a whole new way.”

“This Symposium was over flowing with important information about a new way of thinking for working with all our patients or clients, not just those with Parkinson's disease.”

“This was a great course to expand my knowledge of Basal Ganglia disease and treatment options. I have been certified in the LSVT BIG program for years but would also like to branch out and have other options for my patients. This course gave me lots of ideas”

The last comment above summarizes our basal ganglia’s ability to keep us resonating with bombardment of relaying information that allow us to flow with “lots of ideas” that are recognized and required for satisfactory frontal cortex creativity. And if we don’t occasionally fulfill our dopaminergic ideas, that we create, generate and plan, we may just be laying down the framework for future unplanned kinesia paradoxa, that we want to avoid.

Posted May 5, 2021 at 3:34PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians Science

Earlier this month, I was in Fort Collins, CO teaching Pelvis Restoration after 14 months out of the faculty circuit. For many reasons that will prove impossible to come close to articulating here, this course in review proved difficult to concisely write. These past two years, objectively, I have lost a lot—a child to disease, a dear co-worker to miscommunication, contact with a dear friend and colleague to culture, contact with another dear friend and colleague to a series of business casualties...to name a few. I mention these losses because I am certain this same window has been uniquely difficult year for most everyone reading this, regardless of where you find yourself. I’m sorry for each of your losses, yet very much hopeful.

Just through that window, I take heart, because I am confident that all of these losses are temporary, and will prove to be blessings, each in their own way, though I may not understand how presently. For certain, goodness was found in Fort Collins!  It is also difficult to encapsulate how thankful I am for my good, longtime friend and colleague Craig Depperschmidt, a 2012 PRC graduate and PRI hub in Colorado, to have welcomed me back to Fort Collins with undeserving hospitality. It was tremendous working with newer friends Brian Benjamin, who served tremendously as host site coordinator, as well as Rachel Kroncke, Sara Truelsen, and Ruth Waller-Liddle in the ProActive PT Center family who welcomed PRI and me into their work home fully. Thank you each so much for your warm welcome!

Pelvis Restoration course on asymetrical pelvic influence

Pelvis Restoration course on asymetrical influences of the pelvis

The course was akin to being back on one’s favorite horse—saddle and content were true and just as they should be. Many thanks to Matthew McLaughlin for great discussion during the course and during break times. Thank you to Jason Huang, Ryan LaFountaine, Jessica Robinson, Cristi Cuellar and multiple others for your help with demonstration during lab sessions as we explored the many facets of this primary course about a pelvic inlet and outlet. Many interactions during both lecture and lab about clinical application hopefully proved beneficial to experienced veteran course participants and to the six-pack of those new to the science of PRI. This instructor enjoyed the respectful and vigorous participation from the class as we discussed optimizing neuromechanical position and triplanar control of hemipelvic inlets and outlets in order to allow alternating integrated function of synchronized ipsilateral pelvic and thoracic diaphraghms. Thank you all from ProActive PT and PRI who made this course possible once again, it really was and is good to be back!

It was a wonderful weekend teaching a Pelvis Restoration as a “hybrid" course. Teaching to professionals attending the course in person and through Zoom was exciting and humbling. Thank you to everyone who attended. Your desire to learn and passion for the Science of PRI is amazing. We had great questions and interaction through both forums this past weekend. We had energy. We had passion. We had a desire to learn. I felt an improved understanding of the “external” support of the pelvis with tri-planar movement (especially the frontal plane) was understood at a deeper level for improved regulation of internal pressure and airflow. I felt course attendees appreciated the PRI objective tests and how they can assist them clinically to improve PRI Non-Manual Techniques selection for patient treatment. I also felt in insight was also gained in not only “re-positioning” the pelvis but then “re-training” that pelvis for left stance and right swing with our goal to “restore” for reciprocal and alternating movement.

We were “world-wide” this past weekend with course attendees from all across the U.S. and internationally. Thank you again for all that came. It was great to teach as it makes me a better clinician.

Posted April 21, 2021 at 4:36PM

The Cantrell Center for Physical Therapy & Wellness has an immediate job opening for:

  • PHYSICAL THERAPIST (PT)
  • PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT (PTA)

***NEW GRADS, UPCOMING GRADS, & EXPERIENCED CLINICIANS MAY APPLY***

The Cantrell Center for Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine is a physical therapist-owned private practice and has been serving Middle Georgia for over 28 years. A Certified Postural Restoration Center since 2008, we’re proud to employee clinicians who have a passion for the science and value our one-on-one approach to patient care. We are currently looking to hire both a Physical Therapist and a Physical Therapist Assistant for our booming practice!

We currently have 2 Postural Restoration Certified Therapists (PRC's) in the clinic making us highly sought after by our referring physicians, our patients, and wellness members.  We often have patients who travel out of town and even out of state to come to the Cantrell Center as we are the only Postural Restoration Certified Facility in the state of Georgia.  

Located in Warner Robins, Georgia, the Cantrell Center is located in the Middle of the state! Just a quick drive to Atlanta or the beach, Warner Robins offers convenience to any interest without the crime rate and elevated costs of a larger city.  Visit the website of Robins Regional Chamber for more information about the city of Warner Robins.

What makes The Cantrell Center a great place to work?
At the Cantrell Center, patient care is paramount and each team member’s gifts and experiences blend to create an atmosphere of integrity and encouragement. As part of our team, you will work side-by-side with like-minded and dedicated colleagues, while enjoying the opportunity to build your own career.

WE OFFER:
•    A Work/Life Balance — We understand that you have a family outside of work
•    Outstanding work environment – Beautiful, clean, state-of-the-art facility!
•    Commitment to clinical excellence – You’ll learn from the best!
•    Team atmosphere – Our employees care about each other!
•    Ethical standards – We have a reputation for the best patient care!
•    Constant training and learning – You will learn cutting edge PRI treatment methods
•    An excellent mentoring program for new hires – especially for new grads
•    Competitive salary and benefits package

To learn more about The Cantrell Center for Physical Therapy & Wellness...
•    Visit our website
•    Find us on LinkedIn
•    Find us on Facebook
•    Find us on Instagram
•    Learn about our Annual Cantrell Center 5K & Fun Run

If you’re interested in joining our team, please send your resume to pr@cantrellcenter.com.

Posted April 8, 2021 at 4:27PM
Categories: Clinicians

"The new normal."  That's a phrase we all have heard many times during the last 10 months. As we are all adjusting to what that phrase means to us individually on a personal level, all of us are adjusting to what that means with regards to our relationships with each other as well. We are all finding new boundaries, and freedoms, associated with this "new normal."  

PRI opened the 2021 year with the newly revamped Impingement and Instability course, which introduces the concept that impingement and instability are both necessary and vital for optimal human performance. They provide new boundaries and freedoms that allow us to be able to oscillate between our two hemispheres of our body and brain. Our body needs to find a "new normal" with these new parameters in order to appreciate the left side of our body and the right hemisphere of our brain. As I reminded the course attendees, the question isn't "are you going to get onto your left leg?", the question is "how are you going to get onto your left leg?"  

This upgraded course introduces the neuromechanical concepts to answer the question of "how", as this course serves as a gateway into the other PRI Secondary and Tertiary courses, such as Forward Locomotor Movement. This is the material Ron was looking to introduce 20 years ago, and it is my honor to be able to help provide the neurological answers to the question "how are you going to get onto your left leg?" As we discussed during the entirety of the weekend, the how is rooted in one's ability to compress, or impinge, certain areas of the body, and decompress, or destabilize, other areas of the body. In order for the brain to appreciate these novel concepts, we need to provide the cortex of the brain with novel reference centers for proper inhibition of functional cortical dominance.

As we embarked on our "new normal, " not only in 2021, but in our cerebral cortical function, this course has now become much less of the orthopedic course it had to be several years ago, but has progressed into the neuromechanical blueprint for behavior modification that Ron had intended from Day 1 of the Institute. This course has always been my personal favorite of all the PRI courses offered because it is a clinician's course as it provided me a more integrated manner to apply the information I had learned in the three PRI introductory courses. My appreciation for this course has grown dramatically due to the necessary evolution from an orthopedic delivery to a neuromechanical, cohesive, and expansive delivery of PRI concepts. As the attendees of the course can attest to, Impingement and Instability helps our body's ability to appreciate the "new normal" from the inside out.

Posted January 21, 2021 at 5:31PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

We are excited to introduce and congratulate our Postural Restoration Trained (PRT) Class of 2021! PRT is the result of completing multiple advanced PRI courses, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the science through completion of the PRT application, and successfully participating in practical and analytical testing. This past weekend, five professionals earned the designation of Postural Restoration Trained (PRT) under the direction of Ron Hruska, Dan Houglum and Jennifer Platt.

The Postural Restoration Institute® established this credentialing process in 2011 as a way to recognize and identify individuals with advanced training, extraordinary interest and devotion to the science of postural adaptations, asymmetrical patterns and the influence of polyarticular chains of muscles on the human body as defined by the Postural Restoration Institute®. The PRT credential is available to Certified Athletic Trainers, Certified Athletic Therapists, Exercise Physiologists and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists who have completed the course requirements, application and testing process. With the addition of this class, there are now 59 PRT professionals throughout the U.S and Internationally.

To view/download the photos click here.

Back Row (L to R): Ron Hruska, Philip DeNigris, Jarrett Kolich, Dan Houglum;
Frong Row (L to R): Jennifer Platt, John "Amos" Mansfield, Diane Banderas, Yoshikatsu Abe

Posted January 13, 2021 at 6:34PM

What a fun experience it was to be able to connect with the 37 participants from last month’s live stream pediatrics course! With the new format, we were able to reach attendees in Japan, Canada, Poland, and India! James and I also brought the PRI science to 6 new (“VIP”) clinicians! Further, the audience was made up of yoga instructors, OT’s, personal trainers, and of course, PT’s. The participants seemed to enjoy the many videos of PRI treatment with children of all ages and all skill development levels. We were even able to do some demonstrations with kids! A special shout out to Jen Platt, Nancy Hammond, Libby Lostetter, and anyone else who let us use your children for a spotlighted kid demo! And the adult attendees who participated in demonstrations were also greatly appreciated as it brought a nice richness to the learning experience.

I’ve since been in touch with some of the attendees to see what they thought about the new format and a common comment is how nice it is to have the recording of the class for 10 days following the weekend to go back and review and refresh! It worked out so well, we are planning another Live Stream for August 28-29, 2021 with hopefully a couple in person courses as well. Check out the schedule, and tell your friends! Lastly, huge shout out to co-presenter, James Anderson, producer, RJ Hruska, as well as to Hannah Hankins and Jen Platt for all of the scheduling, manual edits and production, technical help and behind the scenes planning that putting a course like this together requires! And last but not least, thanks to Ron Hruska for the genius foundation! Hope to see you in 2021!

Boy is was good to be back teaching a live course this year. It was food for my spirit to have human interaction and comradery. My fellow colleagues that attended this weekend’s Pelvis Restoration Course were also grateful to be attending a live course as well. We all needed it. We did it safely for our community and each other. We had four professionals attending their first PRI course and several were attending their 3rd course or more this weekend. I feel the class took away the value of the pelvic inlet and outlet positioning needed not only to achieve left stance and right swing, but the value of this positioning to integrate with the respiratory diaphragm in the thorax for the left and right sided hemi-pelvis’ to compress and decompress to allow for Forward Locomotor Movement. Having a smaller class size afforded more personalized lab time for PRI tests, techniques, and practice. It was a fun fun weekend to teach and to learn. Thank you IRG for hosting Pelvis Restoration in Mill Creek.

Posted October 28, 2020 at 9:32PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

The greatest directional influence on our body’s tensegrity and tempo is forward movement. All of our integration of planar function and neurosensory function is correlated with our environment moving backward; as we cough, speak, walk, reach, chew, listen, sit, watch, etc. The slightest forward movement of the head, arm or leg, is cortically recognized and managed through vestibular related memory and reflex, and cerebellar coordination of the somatic motor sphere. Our ground and space around us are “ours” when we move forward. No one else possesses this personalized biopsychosocial and psychophysiological event. The benefits associated with forward movement, far out weigh those of moving in any other direction. And that would include the wonderful gift of “falling” backward, only to “catch” ourselves, by reaching forward, with a head, arm or leg.


The greatest benefit of having lateralized cortices for integrated visuo-spatial, hemispheric chest, upper limb and lower limb alternation is bipedal, upright forward locomotor movement. Between five million and seven million years ago, some apelike creatures in Africa began to walk habitually on two legs, through savannas, using visuo-spatial propulsion, inter and intra arm pull, and hemi-chest compression.  They never could have walked from Africa into Asia and Europe, two million years ago, if they did not first make and flake crude stone tools with their upper limbs, a half million years prior to that time.   Their arm function was necessary for their respiratory chest endurance to travel and for their peripheral view as a safe voyager.


The modern form of a human, as we know of today, depended on this earlier pre-existent, hemi-cortical dominance, approximately 200,000 years ago, for refinement of existential forward movement that revolved around the establishment of culture and community.  How we shape, grow, pattern and build our behavior and our body, depends on how we move objects that are in front of us and to the side of us, toward us and to the back of us, with inter and intra-limb pull, chest compression, and visuo-spatial propulsion; all allowing us to move forward, like our 200,000 year old ancestors.

(Sarah Petrich, @drsarahpetrich, Instagram)

Our industrial commercialism, capitalism, and careerism, in the present time, has contributed to our heads moving forward, objects in front of us moving forward with us, and objects or environments on the side of us, all moving forward together at some, or all of the time during “walking”. We are on an ecological and evolutionary timeline where the human, in his and her civilization, are doing everything they can to move themselves forward efficiently, in an existential sense. Unfortunately, because of the un-natural commodities around them, they are also moving the entire environment and world around them, with them. Our cortices developed in size because of the need for cortical interplay, as we became dependent on each other, through our sense of movement, space, communication and balance from our eyes and ears, chest walls and cavities and upper and lower limbs. Concrete pavements, straight walls and fast-moving transport systems did not develop today’s unhealthy and unnatural imbalanced forward locomotion. It did however, help bring out the biological rivalry we so often see in our patients, between their two eyes, ears, arms, chests, and legs; and furthermore, contributed to the more recent world of over lateralization for survival of the fittest, fastest and flattest (spine) humans.

(Sarah Petrich, @drsarahpetrich, Instagram)

Homo Sapiens, and the way they move themselves forward, are still evolving and the four components of corollary cortical function are outlined in this course, simply because these four components and the degree to which they are used with and by each other, will reflect on the future’s researcher and anthropologist studies of Holocene human climate of forward movement patterns. Our social climate, our environmental climate and our health climate reflects the demands and challenges we place on our own bodies and thus the environment that encompasses these human patterns of addicted adduction of four of the most precious resources are bodies possess.


I personally, want to thank Jen Platt who consistently and constantly puts up with me and my insane requests to put material together that has never been put together, to my knowledge, in the manner that we have, with outlined research that supports the forward movement, that we should respect. I have been looking forward to teaching a course like this for many years. Therefore, it is hard to summarize my feelings about this topic and the opportunity that this year and the staff around me, presented me. Such a gift. Personal gratification is extended to all you who are observant, and watchful of this journey, of broadening the environment and evolution that is responsible for the patterned world we live with and in, today.

(Nancy Hammond, @integrate360, Instagram)

Posted October 13, 2020 at 4:06PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

I had the wonderful fortune to visit with Dan Houglum MSPT, ATC/L, PRC the day before this course was presented via live stream, beginning on Aug 22nd. Dan’s insight on the Institute’s past, present and upcoming future is always appreciated and questioned by me, simply because he places events, courses, course material provided in two or more courses, timelines, and approaches in an aligned state, for comparison, contrast and collocation. He and his career time have grown around this juxtaposition. He has an intuitive sense of how organizations operate by addressing and assessing this operational behavior, and therefore, he enjoys watching, and participating in, the delivery of the Impingement and Instability course; that was initially offered in 2007 without the ability of the attendee to compare it to another pre-existing course.  

The fact that the first course in February of 2007 can be compared to the last course presented in August of 2020, allows one to quickly see the similarities and the advancements. The fact of two courses, with the same title, written by the same author, can be placed close together with contrasting effects is called a juxtaposition. The juxtaposition of these two courses portray an image of position of bones in 2007 and a position of sense of these same bones in 2020. Dan took his first PRI course in 2004 and has had significant juxtaposition moments since. Juxtaposition is a word that describes the contrasting effect of two things that are placed side by side or close together. For example, two course manuals, with different dates and yet with the same information, may have juxtaposition when one of the courses have been updated, advanced or added onto. Another example of juxtaposition, is this course itself, by looking at cortical function of the human’s two sides of the body that are parallel to each other or “next to each other”. Instability on one side of the body may need to occur when the other side of the body, in the same region, is referencing impingement or the contact of two bony or joint surfaces. One side needs to cortically “loosen” up while the other side can “tighten” up.

   

This ‘positional juxtaposition’ helps us appreciate the need to experience instability, to remain on guard and prepared, as well as the need to experience impingement, to remain confident and in control, when we lose sense of composure. Parallelism of our two sides of our body, and their associated neurologic and orthopedic juxtapositions, has always been a strong interest of Dan’s, and having him by my side, when I taught this live stream course, gave me and everyone that was present, a considerable amount of favorable comparative contrast.

Posted August 31, 2020 at 9:35PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science
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