Science

Pro-Active Physical Therapy in beautiful Fort Collins, CO hosted Cervical Revolution this past weekend. This was a unique gathering of not only first timers to Cervical Revolution but seasoned veterans of PRI including a total of four faculty members and four PRC/PRT's. Included in the group was a local dentist, Dr. Behar Esmaili, who brought an enthusiastic perspective on how occlusion affects the entire physiologic and postural system. The subject of a stomatognathic consideration to the cervical, cranial and occlusal system with the cervical spine as the primary driver of the system was reinforced this weekend.

Postural Restoration is an interdisciplinary institute and that was reflected in the backgrounds of the attendees. Cervical Revolution bridges a gap, as does PRI, with many professions with respiration sacred to physical therapists, the atlas/spine with chiropractors, the cranium with osteopaths and occlusion with dentists. Mix in ATC's and fitness professionals for performance and this course, as well as every other PRI course, has a wide appeal and utilization for many health care disciplines.

Having four faculty members in attendance is rare unless a course is given in Lincoln and the energy with vast clinical expertise of Louise Kelley, DPT, Jason Miller, DPT and Craig Deperschmidt, DPT was appreciated by all. Louise Kelley, DPT will soon be ready to teach Cervical Revolution and her ability to describe testing and non-manual techniques, especially the Standing Stomatognathic Squat, was a "bonus" contribution to the weekend and was also greatly appreciated. The discussion of the A/O articulation being highly neurologic/autonomic went from a theoretical consideration in opening remarks to real lab experience when several "extension driven" students, with PRI Cervical repositioning non-manual techniques, got to experience first hand what neutral feels like. Thanks to all of the Pro-Active Staff for hosting this past weekend and this entire group of professionals that took time out of their schedules to "revolve" with us!

Where Would We Be Without Interference? Our Recovery Depends On It.

After talking about the molars influence on “grounded” movement and the canines influence on “guided” exploration, I become more mindful about the direction, both the Institute and these teeth have always had on the influence of “posture”. Our recovery of food going down the wrong “pipe”, our recovery of losing our balance when slipping on a rug, our recovery of mis-pronouncing when using familiar vernacular, our recovery of our visual focus when we misjudge objects in the distance, our recovery of our anti-gravitational unilateral abdominals, hamstrings, and triceps, our recovery of our breath......etc. all require a sense of ourselves, our interoception, our ‘centric’ presence, that is given to us through occlusal and podal interference.   

I have evolved my life around these human grounded and un-grounded concepts of reference and restraint guidance. And I am only hopeful, as illusory as the concepts, research and corollaries that were provided in this very highly integrated course on teeth and feet are and can be, that health care providers will appreciate how to “recover” better through the integration of the ‘floors’ the maxillae, and the ‘floors’ the feet depend on for postural balance. I am enlivened for those dentists and movement specialists who decide to immerse themselves into the world of recovery, by addressing how to put the neck to rest, through pterygoid, palatine, and plane alternation. The resonance of recovery is the most grounded state one can accomplish. Simply because the action, the guidance, and sense of limitation, which is what the sense of interference provides, protects and relaxes our necks and essentially, us.

If after reading this, you become more curious about our need for balance built off of interferences, please consider taking this course, offered on October 14th and the 15th, or consider attending this year’s Spring Symposium on “The Stomatognathic System: An Interdisciplinary Approach In The Management of Spatial Navigation and Structural Strength” on April 22nd and the 23rd.

Melissa Truska, thank you for balancing me out those two days. With you on my left and Jen Platt on my right, I felt so grounded and supported, as a presenter in front of a screen of so many I truly wanted to personally interact with, individually. There were countless questions, that were answered by Jen Platt. I appreciate her so much. Her talent and historical presence in this Institute allows me to do what I appreciate doing. And that is presenting material that has foundation, regardless of how familiar one is with that foundation of science. PRI applications and techniques, are built off of and around my beliefs, practice and principles. And Jen and her staff keep me, the faculty and all of us grounded, secured and consistent, in a world full of confusion and mis-interference.

Posted April 1, 2022 at 2:12PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

I had a wonderful time teaching Pelvis Restoration in Bradenton Florida!  Thank you IMG Academy for hosting , Megan for being my lab assistant, and the course attendees for learning with me for the weekend.  

As always, we went into detail of the pelvis position anteriorly and posteriorly and left and right in the pelvis inlet and outlet.  How this position influences compression and decompression of the pelvic inlet and outlet and how the respiratory and pelvic diaphragms assist in treating the L AIC and PEC patterns to allow for lateralization to the left and right.  The course attendees stated that understanding PRI objective tests to assist with inhibition/facilitation of the L AIC and PEC polyarticular chain of muscles to assist with treatment to restore reciprocal and alternating movement was helpful.

It was a great class with great energy!  Thank you for spending your weekend with me.

Posted March 29, 2022 at 8:03PM
Categories: Courses Science

Without a doubt, the opportunity to present the science of PRI to a live group of movement professionals was a great sign to me that we are getting closer and closer to the resumption of our previous "normal" lives. I had never had the pleasure of speaking in Massachusetts previously, and it was a wonderful experience. The newly updated Impingement and Instability course provides a neuromechanical explanation of the "why" behind many PRI concepts and how to apply the science to a variety of conditions and patient populations.

We were able to link the scapula to the calcaneus, femur, and pelvis, so by the time we got to scapular instability, we have the freedom to discuss other avenues of treatment and concepts that we previously were unable to discuss. This is the course we have the opportunity to dive into the concept of talar wobble, balancing hamstring activity, and the pressure sensitivity of the scapula.

Our exploration into the value of pressure management and how pressure is the "Morse Code" of postural and body awareness, as well as how the body learns to make changes to movement strategies was lengthy. This course provides the opportunity to go down some rabbit holes that we ordinarily are unable to proceed into in other courses.   

My thanks to the entire Train Boston crew for a great venue and very welcoming experience. It was an honor to have three certified individuals attend the course: Mike Mullins, Donna Behr, and Phil DeNigris. It was wonderful for me to have your questions and feedback, and those who were newer to PRI appreciated it as well. Thank you for a wonderful weekend and getting back to "normal."

Posted March 28, 2022 at 8:57PM
Categories: Courses Science

I had a great time this weekend in Lincoln NE, at the Postural Restoration Insitute. I had the pleasure of teaching Myokinematics of the HIp and Pelvis to 12 in person and 55 live stream attendees. The Institute continues to grow and it was my pleasure mentoring both Jason Miller and Craig Depperschmidt. They were not only my lab assistants for the weekend, but they both jumped right in to help me teach the Sunday afternoon clinical application of both facilitation and inhibition non manual techniques.


I really enjoy teaching and helping both new and seasoned PRI clinicians along their PRI journeys. We had some great discussions on the differences between orientation (uncompensated) and compensations that are commonly seen at the FA joint when a pelvis gets positioned in a L AIC pattern. No two courses in PRI are taught the same and this course was no different. I had the privilege of sharing my 20 years of PRI clinical experience and 11 years of teaching with this weekend's course attendees. We had fun using some of my favorite musicians references Lady Gaga (born this way), Beyonce (to the left) and new to 2022 Dua Lipa (Levitate)! Go get those 5/5 HADLT and see those patients levitate off the table! Cheers until we meet again PRInation! Thanks to Kevin Fay for giving me yet another musical reference from Idina Menzel (let it go) to help us all remember how important inhibition is early in a program!

Posted February 23, 2022 at 4:53PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

One Thing in Life You Do Not Want To Lose

There are so many things in life that need to be dropped off, like primitive reflexes, baby teeth, and excessive weight. But the one thing you don’t want to lose is your natural, neutral position of your upright neck.  Our upright cervical lordosis of 30 degrees, plus or minus a few degrees, reduces our masticatory stress, subglottal stenosis, head and cervical lateral displacement, as well as our development of open bites, mouth breathing, elevated hyoid malposition, and lowered glossal function. Therefore, you, me and humans in general, do not want to lose the capability of positioning and placing ourselves around a centrally located, cervical spine that has the ability to laterally flex each direction, from an appropriate, normal cervical aligned state, associated with 30 degrees of lordotic curvature. Our livelihood depends on this ability to keep, use and alternate our behavior from this homeostatic state.

Therefore, this is one thing in life I do not want to lose.

This course gives you, the speaker and your patients the opportunity to develop skills and sense on how to keep it.  And with the help of Skip George DC,PRC and Louise Kelley DPT, PRC we reinforced the way to assess, intervene and keep normal, neutral, natural cervical lordosis. Its like the clean air we breathe, the clear water we drink, the natural, non-preservative based food we eat, the honest, good people we interact with and the naturopathic sleep we desire. It is health. It is the best 30 degrees of preventative medicine there is. Skip and Louise, live their life around these concepts and are living examples of what it takes to keep it. Their presentation on how to revolve around a neck and function with a neck that has been re-positioned, will enlighten you. I am sure, one thing they will not lose in their life, is their neutral, natural cervical lordosis. They have been incorporating neuro-mechanics that evolved around 30 degrees of cervical lordosis, their entire life.

Posted February 1, 2022 at 10:46PM
Categories: Courses Science

The Impingement and Instability course was the kick-off for PRI in 2022, and I was fortunate to be able to have several friends and colleagues in the audience. With this course being updated only two years ago, it has a decided different feel compared to the previous iterations. We were fortunate to have nearly 50 attendees via Zoom from 10 different countries, and 8 movement professionals in-person. With so much PRI experience "in the room", both in-person and virtual, we were afforded the luxury of delving into the neurology of PRI.  

Our ability to make substantial and long-standing change to our posture is dependent upon our ability to change how our brain perceives the environment and gravity.  This course explains how that occurs and why reference centers are a better "road map" for us to be able to modify our patterns and habits.  Starting at the calcaneus and talus, we discussed integration of the femur and why we need it to be unstable, which lead us to the pelvis and why pelvic inlets and outlets are linked to the calcaneus.  We were able to spend nearly 4 hours on linking the scapula and underlying thorax to the pelvis and femur and calcaneus.  Our ability to compress and decompress several different "floors" on each side allows our body to make sense of this Morse Code-like alternation for improved posture, patterns, and respiration.  

My thanks to the entire crew from Edge Physical Therapy: Beth, Mike, Brett, and Eric. Thank you for your questions and dialogue. And thank you to Meg and allowing us to learn from your experience of what it finally means to feel the floor under your feet.  And thanks to Lori Thompson and taking the time to go through the Shoe List.  That was a perfect conversation at the part of the course, and I truly hope those in attendance understand just how unique that experience was for all of us.  Thanks to all of those who attended, and here's to a wonderful 2022!

Posted January 20, 2022 at 11:04PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians Science

I honestly look forward to the Advanced Integration course every year. It offers a moment in time, at the end of the year to reflect and to resolve issues that arose in the time period between the last Advanced Integration course and the present one. It is a moment in my personal life where I can decide if I should move into areas of discussion built off of  platforms that were laid down in the recent past, or not. It is a brief period of time where I can review where we, as an Institute, are with respect to concepts that are better accepted and appreciated. This acceptance and appreciation will result in longer periods of time where application becomes a mainstream of future assessment and intervention, and more importantly, an expectation.  

Summarizing the same main concepts in 2004, at the first Advanced Integration course, offered me a moment to integrate neurological, biased, patterns of breathing with tri-planar movement and muscle through discussions on thoracic flexion and curvature of the spine, with 20 to 30 people. Who would have ever thought that there would be 80 plus people, from 8 different countries, attending a four day course with the same title, the same platforms, but advance application because of 17 other moments in time where this course, with the same title, in the same number of days, advanced the original moments in time, so exponentially.

Focusing on dextral orientation, thought processes the human uses for integrated  unilateral and contralateral anatomy and associated sense, two central diaphragm axis’s that regulate our spinal axis, and the importance of ‘left hand to right knee’ function, in today’s world of unlimited Artificial Intelligence (AI)  and limited Advanced Integration (AI), is a reflection of many, many moments in this Institute’s history, where planned periods of time, in this case 96 hours or 4 days, had a major impact on future AI.

Thank you Locatelli Rao DPT, OCS, PRC, Greer Mackie PT, DPT, OCS, Donald Ryan Hodge CSCS, LMT, and Beth Lewis for your help with live demonstration and discussion. We were so grateful. Thank you Taylor Boryca, PTA, for your Kolaches (Czech and Polish fruit pastry that I was raised on) that you served us. And most importantly, thank you Louise Kelley, DPT, PRC, Lori Thomsen, MPT, PRC, Dan Houglum, MSPT, ATC/L,PRC, Jean Masse, PT,OCS, ATC, PRC, and Lisa Mangino, PT, DPT, PCS, C/NDT, PRC for your integrative presentations and ongoing interaction. It was one of my favorite Advanced Integration courses that I have ever been a part of, or have given. Hopefully, if you haven’t been to one of these in recent years, you will consider coming in the next few.  Reach out and talk to someone who has attended this year’s AI course; and I believe you will be encouraged to attend or re-attend, regardless where you are in your PRI moments of time.

Click below to view full photo album,

ADVANCED INTEGRATION 2021 

Posted December 20, 2021 at 8:58PM

We are excited to announce and congratulate the Postural Restoration Certified (PRC) Class of 2021! PRC credentialing is the result of completing multiple advanced PRI courses, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the science through completion of the PRC application, and successfully participating in practical and analytical testing. This week, 7 clinicians earned the designation of Postural Restoration Certified (PRC) under the direction of Ron Hruska, Louise Kelley, Dan Houglum, and Jennifer Platt earlier this week.

The Postural Restoration Institute established this certification process in 2004 as a way to recognize and identify those individuals with advanced training, extraordinary interest and devotion to the science of postural adaptations, asymmetrical patterns and the influence of polyarticular chains of muscles on the human body as defined by the Postural Restoration Institute. The PRC credentialing program is available to physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, occupational therapists, and chiropractors who have attended PRI courses, demonstrated a thorough understanding of the science through completion of the PRC application, and successfully participate in both clinical and analytical testing. To date, 233 professionals have earned the designation of Postural Restoration Certified (PRC).

To view/download the photos click here.

Back Row: Lousie Kelley, Ron Hruska, Brad Yotty, Beth Quinn, Locatelli Rao, Dan Houglum

Front Row: Jamie McMurtrey, Derya Anderson, Cody Gillis, Rie Takakura, Jennifer Platt

Posted December 17, 2021 at 5:58PM

An Introspective Approach to the Treatment of Functional Cortical Predominance associated with forward movement of one’s body requires reliance on the observation of one’s mental state, as well as examination of one’s own conscious thoughts and feelings about physical mechanics. This course offers the PRI minded clinician an opportunity to explore the components of human cortical processing required for normal or natural, unilateral biomimicry of contralateral processes that are dominant in advancing oneself forward, into and though hemi-lateral and hemispheric forces, that may or may not be perceived or recognized.


Most individuals that do not have natural use, or flow of the four hemispheric components outlined in the Forward Locomotor Movement course, will express forward movement with suppression of one or more of the four components, for unilateral functional dominance, associated with ‘unnatural’ forward advancement of their body, and non-biomimetic formation and function.


Biomimetics is the study and development of synthetic or artificial systems that mimic the formation, function or structure of biologically produced substances and materials, or biological mechanisms and processes that are reproduced from unnatural behaviors. In the case of forward locomotor function, humans often ‘synthesize’ artificial mechanisms of movement by mimicking unnatural homolateral movement, which often results in similar bilateral patterns, that were established through biomimetic cortical processing.


When the contralateral function of the human body, produced by unnatural or compensatory function, that may or may not mimic the ipsilateral function, occurs, the human will rely on biomimetics to synthesize, fabricate or re-produce an acceptable ‘unnatural’ function, for the compensatory form required for safe, effortless, forward advancement of itself.   

 
This unnatural biomimetic behavior often becomes cortically represented and patterned with “natural” contralateral or unilateral function that is recognized, strengthened and patterned by existing functional cortical sites of respective human cortical dominance. This novel integrated patterned functional cortical dominance, along with the associated replacement of biomimetic components of novel, unnatural function, become embedded and accepted as natural neurologic function and flow, for future forward kinetic movement challenge and recognition.


By breaking down the four hemispheric biomimetic components humans use to move themselves forward, the attendee can gain a deep appreciation for the need to consider the influences the hemi-chests, arms, and the eyes can have on flow, effort and trajectory, when designing or outlining a program for the challenged forward mover of his or her body and legs.


Conversation like this, in a tertiary PRI course, is so easy for me to engage into with people who are willing to interact, acknowledge their confusion, share their opinions and provide clinical insight. I greatly appreciated the open dialogue with the live stream individuals who did just that. Laura Kompkoff OD, Ginger Mandy PT, Stephanie Ritter PT, and Kris Zeller-Hack MD, thank you so much for the interaction.


 I also want to thank Masa Abe, ATC, CSCS, Chad Beckman SCCC, PRT, CSCS, Heather Jenny PT, PRC, WCS, Yoshi Mitsuyama MS, ATC/L, PES, PRT, and Stuart Nichols, ATC who helped so much in demonstration, discussion and dialogue on topics that were made easier to discuss because of their actual presence. Actually, I appreciate all those who are here, in-person. Your travel, lodging and overall expense to be here is not overlooked, and I appreciate all of you who come to Lincoln, for any of our PRI courses. It is such an invaluable opportunity for any speaker. Thank you.

Posted November 30, 2021 at 10:37PM
Categories: Courses Science
First ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... Last

Products

CD Bundles
Non-manual Techniques
Manual Techniques DVD
Manual Techniques
Illustrations
PRIVY
PRI Video for You