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"Two short days" in Denver, CO at Ethos Colorado Training Facility went by swiftly! Thank you Jonathan Pope and the Ethos team for graciously hosting our Lumbo-pelvic-femoral discussion and application lab. I thoroughly enjoyed my time introducing and helping to refine the implementation of PRI science to a sharp, articulate, interactive group of strength trainers like Stephanie Zoccatelli, massage therapists like Libby Tegeler, ATC's like Daniel Waterman, physical therapy assistants like Richard Johnson and physical therapists like Amanda Quanstrom.

Thank you Matt "Big Fish" Malloy, Brittany Marlow, Craig Weller, "Sir" Rachel Voyles, and Gentle Jason Bushie for assisting with lab demonstration. Thank you Amanda Quanstrom, Maria Kyong and Daniel Waterman for timely and apt questions to stimulate thought and flesh out details of AF and FA mobility, position and triplanar dynamics and functional implementation of acquired positions to oppose compensatory "tall truck" strategies.

Thoroughly enjoyed my time with this group of enthusiastic learners! Be well, and here's to "four...long...years" and then some, implementing your strategies with clients!

Posted May 25, 2017 at 3:53PM
Categories: Courses Website

A Recent Email question (from 2008) on understanding psoas relationships with the diaphragm in general: 

“In Myokinematic Restoration, James Anderson talks about how tightly woven anatomically the psoas major is into the right diaphragm leaflet.  Can we then assume that activation of the right psoas can be used and is advantageous to use as a method of activating the right diaphragm/pulling it down to enhance right intercostal expansion?”

Ron’s response: “The interesting thing about the psoas major and the diaphragm is that they have similar influence on the spine in the sagittal plane, but they have an opposite influence on the spine in the transverse plane.  In other words, in the transverse plane, the right psoas major compliments (is agonistic to) the left leaflet of the diaphragm; and the left psoas is agonistic to the right leaflet of the diaphragm.  They work with one another through their “tightly woven” attachments ipsilaterally in the sagittal plane to enhance the extension activity of an extended patient, but work with each other contralaterally across the anterior vertebral bodies in the transverse plane.  So, if you activate the right psoas, you are enhancing the sagittal influence of the right diaphragm leaflet and the transverse influence of the left leaflet (something that is desirable in both planes at both of these sites).  As far as using the right diaphragm to enhance right apical expansion is concerned, it’s incorrect to view it that way.  In fact, it is the torsional respiratory influence of the left diaphragm (not the right) that is primarily responsible for expansion of air into the right chest wall and mediastinum.”

Here are my initial thoughts on the email question: The R hemi-diaphragm doesn’t need help in its respiratory role.  It already has plenty of help in the form of a liver below, larger, thicker crura and central tendon, and better abdominal opposition to maintain its domed positon.  Its dominant respiratory activity contributes to chronic tension, not only of the abdominals, intercostals, and lats on the R side, but also of the muscles associated with the R brachial chain.  This is the crux of the reduced R intercostal and apical expansion.  So can activation of a R psoas change this, and can it improve R apical expansion?  Yes, indirectly, with a host of other muscles, but not by “activating a right diaphragm”.

Ron’s response was to acknowledge that a relationship does exist between the psoas and both the ipsilateral and contralateral hemi-diaphragm.  He states: “So, if you activate the right psoas, you are enhancing the sagittal influence of the right diaphragm leaflet and the transverse influence of the left leaflet (something that is desirable in both planes at both of these sites).”

However, it’s not as simple as flexing your R hip.  To clarify:

In our conversation about this email, Ron reminded me that occasionally a R psoas, not just a L psoas, can get hypertonic in a L AIC pattern. How?

Our brain simply wants fulfillment of L spinal rotation, and these 2 muscles may work together in an attempt in to satisfy the brain’s “request”. 

How is it that the R psoas and L diaphragm (and L psoas and R diaphragm) work harmoniously, if not through “tightly woven attachments”, as is the case ipsilaterally?

A vector force, through fascial connections overlying the anterior vertebral bodies, creates this contralateral influence.

Is this right psoas-left leaflet connection in the transverse plane significant?

No, they are ineffectual in achieving L lower spinal rotation. Why?  Because of the L side’s hyperinflated state and externally rotated ribs.  There is air in the way!

(another consideration:  Because of the orientation of the facets, minimal transverse rotation occurs through the lumbar spine.  That area moves more in the sagittal and frontal planes.  Therefore, it is the psoas’ frontal plane influence that is more significant when it comes to breathing and walking.)

Could a right psoas assist a L diaphragm with drawing air into the R apical chamber? 

Indirectly, yes, along with a host of other muscles.  However, certain conditions must first be met.

James Anderson states: “Limited influence of L crura in the transverse plane, lack of well-established L ZOA, and lack of L abdominal opposition, all complement R lumbar spine orientation.”

The R diaphragm partners with its abdominal wall to maintain its position as a powerful muscle of respiration and rib orientation.

If the R psoas becomes busy trying to rotate the lower spine to the L with a L hemi-diaphragm that has a smaller, shallower crura and with L ribs that are in ER, it will need L IOs/TAs to provide the needed pull on the L lower ribs for thoracic flexion and doming of the diaphragm.  Additionally, L abdominal wall opposition creates intra-abdominal pressure and, therefore, a counter-force to the descending diaphragm.   As long as those L ribs remain in ER, the L hemi-diaphragm will remain in a tonic state, influencing the tonicity so often seen in the L psoas.  In summary, when the L hemi-diaphragm contracts unopposed by the L abdominals, our upper body mass tends to shift to the L and, therefore, force us to compensate by spending more time and placing more weight on the R lower extremity in stance or L swing phases of gait, creating and perpetuating dysynchrony!

So while the R psoas can exert some degree of sagittal plane and L transverse plane motion, it serves us better in the frontal  plane, creating convexity at the lumbar spine to provide fulcrum from which L thoracic abduction can occur.   L thoracic abduction is a necessary movement pattern for maintenance of L ZOA and to provide the L hemi-diaphragm with a fulcrum (L hip) that is now situated directly below.  With an established L ZOA through L IO/TA activation, the L hemi-diaphragm can do its job of breathing – creating pressure differentials that allow us to manage gravity and walk, efficiently – with the least amount of force and torque.  This is how a R psoas indirectly enhances R apical expansion, along with many other muscles not mentioned in this orchestrated movement pattern.

 L IOs/TAs and a domed L hemi-diaphragm are the principle lower spinal/sacral/pelvic rotators to the L. 

Finally, why is it that the L hemi-diaphragm, not the R, expands the R intercostal and apical regions?

Rib position determines a hemi-diaphragm’s respiratory direction of flow.  When ribs are IRd on one side, they are ERd on the other.  IRd ribs assist the hemi-diaphragm with achieving and maintaining its ZOA to effectively draw air in.  Therefore, sufficient activity of the IOs/TAs, via their attachments to the ribs and their influence on intra-abdominal pressure, is a requirement for that hemi-diaphragm’s ZOA. 

IRd ribs don’t allow for much expansion. ERd ribs do. Therefore, once sufficient L IO/TA activity exists, creating L IRd ribs and a ZOA that is now effective for ventilation, the L hemi-diaphragm can draw air into the R apical chest wall, assisting with, and maintaining, its ERd ribs. Remember, when ribs are IRd on one side and ERd on the other, the thorax is positioned in ipsi-lateral abduction and contra-lateral rotation. Hence, it is “the torsional respiratory influence of the left diaphragm (not the right) that is primarily responsible for expansion of air into the right chest wall and mediastinum.”

We have 117 techniques in the standing integration section to teach us to get the R side to let go and to get the L side of rib cage to IR, highlighting the importance of L IO/TA activation to establish L hemi-diaphragm ZOA and restore its respiratory role.

Posted April 18, 2017 at 7:16PM
Categories: Website Courses Science
The article that originally appeared in the April issue of Men's Health is now online, you can read it here.

“It doesn’t matter whether you’re an 80-year-old smoker, a 23-year-old Olympian, or a regular, fit guy-odds are the way you’re breathing right now is flooding your body with stress hormones, compromising your joints and mobility, bottlenecking your energy and undermining your performance in the gym and everyday life. Fourteen times a minute, you become a little weaker and a bit duller.

Hruska is on a mission to change that. Step one is understanding how your body is organized.”

1/ Lungs
They come as a pair, but the left Is smaller to accommodate the heart.
2/ Heart
We shift weight onto our right leg in part to counterbalance this organ.
3/ Diaphragm
It has two sides, but the right is thicker and stronger than the left.
4/ Liver
It also has two lobes, but the right is much larger (by a factor of six).

Ron Hruska was recently interviewed by Men’s Health along with Bill Hartman and Neil Rampe discussing Postural Restoration, after Trevor Thieme, Senior Editor for Men's Health attended a Postural Respiration course last year. Topics discussed include: optimal breathing and the typical respiration patterns, asymmetry, PRI in pro baseball, and common compensations that can cause neck, back and joint pain.  

The 90/90 hip lift with balloon was shown as a way to get your diaphragm in a position to work correctly, helping you to breathe appropriately and avoid chronic stress which can increase your risk of dementia by 67%, stroke by 59% and diabetes by 45%.

“You can think of neutrality of being functionally symmetrical- the ability to shift your center of gravity from one side to the other, to breathe efficiently with both lungs, and to maintain position of your true core. “Being neutral helps everything,” says All-Star first baseman Paul Goldschmidt. “When I lift, I’m stronger. When I run, I’m faster. It allows me to fully express my power and speed.”

If you haven't already, go out and grab the April 2015 Men’s Health issue and flip to page 144 to read the article, which they refer to as the "#1 Greatest Health Tip Ever!"

Posted April 24, 2015 at 3:58PM

We are excited to have launched the PRI Japanese microsite! CLICK HERE to view this page! This microsite will allow individuals to register to the upcoming PRI courses in Japan, as well as post information and blog entries in Japanese. Thank you to Kentaro Ishii and Sayuri Hiraishi for helping with all the translation to make this website a reality!

Posted March 17, 2015 at 9:35PM
Categories: Website

PRI is excited to announce that we will have a Japanese microsite being launched soon! In July, two Myokinematic Restoration courses will be taught in Japan, and we are excited about the future growing of the science of Postural Restoration® in Japan! The microsite should be launched in the next couple weeks, and course registration for the July 19-20th course in Osaka, Japan and the July 25-26th course in Tokyo, Japan will be available at that time. These two courses will be taught in Japanese by Sayuri Abe-Hiraishi and Kentaro Ishii. Each course attendee will receive a course manual which includes both English and Japanese text.

ついにPRIウェブサイトの日本語版ページがオープンします!今年の7月には大阪・東京の二会場でのマイオキネマティック・リストレーション講習会開催も決定し、より多くの日本の皆様にもPRIを知って頂く機会を設けられることを非常に嬉しく思っています。日本語版ウェブページはあと2-3週間で完成の予定で、このページを通じて7月19-20日の大阪会場、7月25-26日の東京会場での講演の登録申し込みが可能になります。これらの講習会は日本人講師(阿部さゆり、石井健太郎)によって完全日本語で行われ、講習で使うマニュアルは英語オリジナルと日本語の翻訳版との両方で書かれています。

I am so excited to be making the trip with them to Japan this summer! If you have any questions about the upcoming courses in Japan, be sure to email me or Sayuri!

私も阿部・石井両氏とこの夏日本に行くのを楽しみにしています!日本での講習開催についてご質問等ありましたら、私に英語でメールを頂くか、日本語対応の方が簡単でしたら阿部さゆりへお気軽にご連絡下さい。

Posted February 27, 2015 at 9:18PM
Categories: Courses Website

As many of you have probably noticed, we have launched our new website! There are some new features on our website we would like to announce:

1) Personal account/login - Not only does this make it easier to register for courses, but it also stores your history of purchases (both products and courses), and also allows you access to post news, articles, etc. on the community page! See more about that below.

2) Community page - Welcome to the Postural Restoration Community! This is where you will read the latest industry news, hear about upcoming events, find helpful deadline reminders, and view a plethora of additional resources regarding our techniques and curriculum. The great part about it is--not only can you can view the entries we post, you can also post about the things that matter to you. Did you find an interesting article about a technique you learned in one of your courses? Do you have a patient case study you want to share with other professionals? Simply click "Submit an Entry" and follow the easy steps towards getting your information published in the PRI Community!

3) Calendar on the home page - This calendar will include all upcoming PRI courses, as well as other events (for example: Michael Mullin presenation at the Perform Better Summit or PRC testing). If you are a PRC or PRT provider, and have any upcoming speaking engagements, be sure to let us know and we will add it to the calendar!

While sometimes change can be difficult, we couldn't be more excited to have this new website up and running! We hope you are excited too. If you have any difficulty navigating through the website, setting up an account, or registering for a course, please contact us via email or by calling 888-691-4583!

Posted September 10, 2013 at 6:52PM
Categories: Website

Ron Hruska just joined twitter!  Follow him @RonHruska. 

Posted February 28, 2013 at 2:53PM
Categories: Website

Our website page “Find a Provider” has been updated to include only those clinicians who have earned the designation of Postural Restoration Certified (PRC). These individuals have attended a required number of PRI courses and successfully completed testing of postural restoration concepts in written and practical format. We feel strongly that their achievement should be recognized and considered for patient referral and professional collaboration. Our previous list also included those who have attended at least two PRI courses and requested to be listed. While this has proven to be a valuable resource, it also has been difficult to determine the accuracy of the list and the level of Postural Restoration expertise of each individual clinician. Therefore, we will reserve this listing solely for those who have earned credentialing through our Institute.

Next year, this listing will be expanded to include Certified Athletic Trainers and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists who earn the designation of Postural Restoration Trained (PRT). More details to come!

Posted June 14, 2011 at 2:20PM
Categories: Website

Each week we will introduce a technique found on one of our two educational CD’s.  We will unveil the reasoning, purpose, application, and progression of each technique to provide guidance in your PRI decision making!

Every non-manual technique you receive in PRI course material originated from a patient.  Each technique has a story, a purpose, and a reason for existence.  What works for some patients may not work for others and thus another activity is born.  Some ask, “how did the concept of PRI start”; through patient care, that’s how.  Over the past 27 years, the creation and evolution of PRI has taken place.  Each patient has taught a lesson, sent a message and left an imprint that encompasses what PRI is. 

PRI has been developing patient handouts used for education of both clinicians and patients for decades.  Although there are an abundance of activities, there is a reason for each and every one.  Please check back weekly to discover our featured Technique of the Week!

Posted September 8, 2009 at 6:27PM
Categories: Website

Although we are a little behind the times, PRI can now be found on Skype™!  We are excited about the opportunity to collaborate with other PRC therapists live!  This technology will give us the capability to consult, while actually seeing the patient and therapist!  If you are already connected to this network, you know how great it is…but for those of you who are not, check it out!

Posted May 28, 2009 at 7:30PM
Categories: Website
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