Techniques

For those of you that have had the chance to read the technique of the week I thought I would share my discussion with Ron Hruska.  I’ll be honest, at first I was a little puzzled when he started discussing GH movement and upper trap contraction promoting GH abduction?  After we talked about it, I was able to visualize the glenoid being similar to the acetabulum.  I was able to pull together the muscular influences of FA and AF in comparison to GH and HG.  After more discussion I realized that this technique could quite possibly be a functional upper extremity test similar to the Hruska Adduction Lift Test.  If the patient can’t perform this technique without activating on their neck, they still do not have their frontal plane.  You, as a clinician would need to go back to the integrative sidelying techniques that incorporate a left internal oblique with right thoracic adduction and left femoral adduction before your patient is capable of performing a Sidelying Hip Lift.  It took me a while to absorb the complexity of this technique and I’m still not 100% there, but I now have a better understanding of the integrative tri-planar control this technique offers our patients and the objectivity this technique offers us as clinicians in assessing and progressing our patient’s programs!

Posted February 16, 2009 at 6:06PM
Categories: Techniques

We have posted a brand new Technique of the Week!  We realize that it is long overdue, however, we promise you won’t be disappointed!  This technique is comprised of seven hand written pages and is said to be by the author, Ron Hruska, ”the best sidelying activity that incorporates the inhibitory processes needed to reduce Left AIC / Right BC tone in the upright individual”.

Posted February 13, 2009 at 6:09PM
Categories: Techniques

In the Left AIC patterned individual, harnessing the crossed extensor reflexes on the right and optimizing the crossed extensor reflexes on the left is encouraged.

During flexion, activation occurs at the ankle (dorsiflexion), then continues up to the knee joint and the hip.  This is usually often seen on the left and why some coaches ask athletes to “cock the toe” or “pull toes up”. The ankle joint is the foundation of flexion.

Activation for extension starts at the hip and moves down to the knee and ankle, creating the leg drive commonly referred to as triple extension.  This is often seen on the right.

Which specific toe would you remove to create a functional obligatory Left AIC pattern? Click here for the answer.

Posted January 27, 2009 at 6:02PM
Categories: Techniques

Technique of the Week: January 2, 2009

It’s here!  We have updated the Technique of the Week from several weeks ago!  To access it, go to “Technique of the Week” under Resources

Posted January 2, 2009 at 6:52PM
Categories: Techniques

A while back we recorded this video to use during a course.  This is Ron Hruska giving step by step instruction on how to perform a 90-90 Hip Lift with Balloon.

Posted December 22, 2008 at 5:25PM
Categories: Videos Techniques

Joan Hanson, MPT, PRC recently sent us this email:

“I was working with a patient yesterday on retrowalking. She had sufficient adductor strength to be on her feet but she locked up during retrowalking. She was turning on her TFL each time she picked up her foot to move it backwards. I therefore had her slide her foot backwards along the carpet and she was able to hold a neutral pelvis. I now call this retroslide. I realize that this patient eventually must be able to pick up her foot and keep a neutral pelvis (gait) but the retroslide will just be a precursor to the retrowalking.”

Posted December 17, 2008 at 5:38PM
Categories: Techniques

What are your favorite activities to isolate the left abdominals and to inhibit the hip flexors?

60-60 Supine Twists
60-60 Supine Twists

60-60 Sidelying Twists
60-60 Sidelying Twists

Sidelying Crossovers
Sidelying Crossovers

Right Sidelying Knee Toward Knee with Balloon
Right Sidelying Knee Toward Knee with Balloon

Left Sidelying IO/TA Foot Toward Foot
Left Sidelying IO/TA Foot Toward Foot

Sidelying Hip Lift
Sidelying Hip Lift

Sidelying Trunk Lift
Sidelying Trunk Lift

Left Sidelying Supported Hip Lift
Left Sidelying Supported Hip Lift

“These are my favorite activities to give individuals with juvenile kyphosis, scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, PEC patterns, and runners”.

What is the most consistent, reinforced, feed-forward integrated muscle group in PRI?
“Left IO’s and left TA’s.”

What is the most common muscle group missed in a PRI integrated program?
“Left abdominals.”

To learn more about PRI non-manual techniques, click here!

Posted October 23, 2008 at 2:54PM
Categories: Techniques

The abdominals have been a popular area of discussion at PRI the last few weeks.  When able to catch a moment of Ron’s “free” time, I asked him a couple of burning questions…

What are your favorite activities to find and feel your left abdominals and achieve a left zone of apposition?

Alternating Posterior Pelvic Rotation and Reciprocal Bilateral Wall Leg Lift
Alternating Posterior Pelvic Rotation and Reciprocal Bilateral Wall Leg Lift

90-90 Crossovers
90-90 Crossovers

60-60 Sidelying Twists
60-60 Sidelying Twists

All Four Belly Lift
All Four Belly Lift

Wall Short Seated Left Arm Reach with Balloon
Wall Short Seated Left Arm Reach with Balloon

Seated Resisted Bilateral Arm Pull Down with Adduction #4
Seated Resisted Bilateral Arm Pull Down with Adduction #4

“These activities are activities I would give for individuals with left rib flairs, someone who has the inability to achieve a left ZOA, for swallowing dysfunction, for PEC patients, for left unilateral neglect, for right upper trap tension and for someone who has an overactive right quadratus lumborum.”

Stay tuned for tommorrow’s question…What are your favorite activities to isolate the left abdominals and inhibit the hip flexors?

To learn more about PRI non-manual techniques, click here!

Posted October 22, 2008 at 2:35PM
Categories: Techniques

Because of the importance of this week’s Technique of the Week, we have created a new activity.  The “Left Stance in Right AF IR Position from the Right AIC Pattern” is the second neuromuscular activity in the PRI integrated standing activities that allows the patient to experience proprioceptive right acetabular femoral internal rotation as he/she shifts their weight from their left non-dominant lower extremity to their right while keeping his/her right leg behind the left. 

Click here to get a copy of this new activity!
Click here to read about the What, Why, When, Where and Who behind this new activity!

Posted October 14, 2008 at 3:22PM
Categories: Techniques

We have all been lectured and given the lecture on the importance of our core stabilizers, the abdominals.  Although everyone needs their abdominals, one patient population in particular needs an abdominal program instructed on their first visit, the PEC patient.  Someone who demonstrates a PEC pattern lacks the ability to “turn off” their hip flexors which positions their pelvis forward bilaterally.  A typical abdominal program would probably increase their symptoms and increase the strength of their already overdevelped hip flexors if the abdominal program didn’t first focus on pelvic position!  When using integrative non-manual techniques for treatment of a PEC pattern, one must always consider choosing an exercise that isolates the abdominals and minimizes hip flexor involvement!

Posted October 8, 2008 at 3:52PM
Categories: Techniques
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