Courses

Postural Respiration – Lima, OH (pronounced “Lie-ma”, like the bean). The course was hosted by Lima Memorial Wellness Center, inside the bright and spacious YMCA. We had clinicians from a range of fields (PT, PTA, OT, ATC, student, exercise physiologist, and chiropractor) and experience (from first course to twelfth). A good deal of time was dedicated to lab, where attendees gained solid familiarity on how to inhibit over-active chains of muscle through both manual and non-manual techniques. It was helpful to have seasoned PRI course-goers stepping in to offer their clinical pearls (Alex Maag, DPT, PRC; Mary Ann Arellano, PTA; Chris Fortman, PT; Melissa Miller, PTA; and Beth Trombley, DPT). Attendees learned the value of blowing up a balloon and filling a left posterior mediastinum and the meaning behind synchronize and separate to achieve optimal gait mechanics through obtaining, and maintaining, a L ZOA.

Thank you to our models John Hollenbacher, OTR/L and Lisa Overman, PTA, who kindly allowed us to evaluate their patterned bodies and who gamely performed non-manual techniques that would challenge any Olympian! Thank you also to our reader, Nancy Siatkosky, DPT, who was nearly flawless (good thing everyone was paying attention and didn't try releasing the subclavius with their derrier!). Many thanks to Alex Maag for fulfilling many roles, from lab assistant and A-V tech support to keeping this instructor well-fed, and to all of the clinicians of Lima Memorial Hospital: Ronnie Ballard, PTA; Cassie Frantz, DPT; Richard Garber, ATC; Mary Jump, PTA; Melissa Miller; Lena Moore, PTA; Nancy Siatkosky; Casey Siefker, PT; Jennifer Smith, PT; and Desiree Wallace, PTA. As someone who has hosted courses in the past, I know the effort that is put forth to make everyone comfortable – including the extra coffee on an oh-so-early Sunday morning😊 your hospitality was superb!

Posted March 14, 2018 at 3:08PM
Categories: Courses

In the fall of 2017, Jen was contacted by Jessica Tidswell, PT, ATC, SCS, PRT, assistant professor for the Physical Therapy and Athletic Training programs at the University of Utah. We have requests for information, providers, course questions and many other inquires on a daily basis, but the request Jess had was different. She has the pleasure of working closely with the graduate athletic training students, and instructs several graduate courses while remaining clinically active through the University. She typically offers an Independent study as part of this course work and had a strong desire to somehow include PRI concepts as part of her 2017 fall semester. Jess has taken several PRI courses including all three primary courses as home studies, and after her conversation with Jen it was determined that our home study would be the perfect fit. Jess decided to focus the entire semester’s independent study on Pelvis Restoration. We were thrilled to have our course be the focus of a graduate level review and after a few more conversations with Jess, we had them up and running. Not only was this the first time the Home Study was used in this way, but she later decided to follow-up the fall semester this spring with the Myokinematic Restoration course for another semester long independent study. Jess is a pioneer in more ways than one. Receiving a Doctor of Physical Therapy in 2002, Jess was clinically active for several years before deciding something was missing. Her background and passion in Exercise Science and Athletic Training led her to return to school, as a student, seeking her second Bachelor’s degree in Athletic training. Jess recently completed her PRT credentialing and is the first DPT, ATC to be credentialed in our  Postural Restoration Trained™ (PRT) credentialing program. Highlights from several of the students who were a part of this Independent study can be read below, and an interview of PRT Jessica Tidswell can be read HERE.

Thank you to Jess, and the students from the University of Utah, who continue to seek a better understanding of our science, and make these semester reviews a success. If any educators are interested in setting up similar Independent Study courses, please feel free to contact me!

Student Reviews:

Upon signing up for this semester-long independent study Pelvis Restoration home study course, how much knowledge of Postural Restoration® did you have if any? If this was your first exposure to the science, what stood out the most to you about this novel way of looking at human asymmetry?

“This was my first exposure to Postural Restoration, and being able to look at postural muscles in a different way and how they affect the innominate bones changed the way I treat my athletes and improved my outcomes.” - Bryan Erspamer, ATC

“Prior to signing up for the independent study, I had previously taken the in-person postural respiration course. I was first exposed to PRI from an athletic trainer and mentor during my first job after graduating from undergrad. It immediately peaked my interests due to its holistic view of the human body. The concepts described by the institute on how our inherent asymmetries relate to dysfunction were initially hard to grasp as a young clinician. However, the more I asked questions and critically applied the science, the more that I knew this was going to be an essential part of my career. Initially, much of my treatment focus was on the location of the injury itself. The Postural Restoration Institute provided the big picture and not only altered how I care for my patients, but also totally revamped the way I view human anatomy.” - Chris Michaels, LAT, ATC

“The semester-long independent study of Pelvis Restoration was the first time I had been introduced to PRI. I appreciated how the PRI approach has a strong focus on the kinetic chain bilaterally. PRI showed a unique perspective to optimize total body function by addressing the inhibition and facilitation needs on each side of the body individually.” - Julia Villani, ATC

As you got closer to the end of the semester did the course material challenge your thinking, or way of looking at certain injuries or dysfunction, that you encounter as an Athletic Trainer? What are some of the ways that you plan on implementing this material, or how do you see this material being utilized in your setting in the future.

“PRI changed the way I treated my athletes, I went from using a lot of muscle energy techniques for short term relief, to putting athletes on PRI programs to actually resolve the underlying issues. Working with hockey players, I see a lot of chronic hip and low back pain. Due to the mechanics of skating hockey players are prone to being in a PEC pattern, so I see myself using PRI on a broader scale in the future, implementing these techniques team wide.” - Bryan Erspamer, ATC

“The course material throughout the semester was both challenging and eye opening. Learning about the intricacies of pelvic motion, how pelvic position relates to asymmetry and dysfunction, and how I can use the Postural Restoration® science to make a long term impact on my patients was career altering. I work with college softball players and often times they complain of shoulder pain, but after taking a more extensive history, I learn that they also suffer from chronic low back and/or knee pain. While doing exercises on the lower extremity as part of an upper extremity rehabilitation program can often seem strange to my athletes, after taking the pelvis course, I know that this approach is essential for long term, total body health. In the future, I hope to implement PRI as a part of my pre-participation physical examinations to screen my athletes and get them started on a Postural Restoration® program prior to competition.” - Chris Michaels, LAT, ATC

“Absolutely, my view of overuse injuries and dysfunctional movement has changed. Now, I not only address the chief compliant but I take a much more detailed look at the pelvis and how it may be influencing the issue. I plan on incorporating PRI techniques in most of, if not all of my overuse injuries and dysfunctional movements. I have yet to find an athlete that would not benefit from some level of PRI exercise.” - Julia Villani, ATC

Overall would you recommend an independent study PRI home study course to other graduate students? How did your view of the science of Postural Restoration® change from the beginning of the semester, once you had completed the course? (Any additional feedback or comments are welcomed below)

“I would absolutely recommend a directed independent study focused on PRI to any graduate level AT. I feel that this was the best way to be introduced to PRI as we had Jess directing us and always willing to answer any questions we might have had. The environment also allowed us to work together as graduate students and better understand the language, the science, and the implementation of PRI. As the semester progressed and I got more of a grasp on the concepts and science behind PRI, I was able to start implementing PRI programs in the clinic. In the independent study set up, I was always able to address any questions or problems I might have had with Dr. Tidswell.” - Bryan Erspamer, ATC

I would strongly recommend the independent study PRI home study course to other graduate students. Taking this course alongside my classmates has created a collaborative learning experience that extends beyond the classroom. Throughout the semester, my classmates and I would meet in the clinic to either talk through questions we had from the course, or practice the special tests and exercises we learned during class time. I think the best part of taking this course as an independent study was that even once the class ended, a sort of PRI culture was created amongst the students who took the class. We all still make a point to check in with one another to discuss how we are applying the material and how we might be able to improve the way we utilize the concepts with our patients. We also have an online group where we share research, videos, and other useful material related to PRI. The independent study PRI home study course has fostered an environment of continuous learning and has changed the way we treat our patients.” - Chris Michaels, LAT, ATC

“I have no hesitation recommending a home study course to other graduate students. In my experience, newly certified athletic trainers have a limited number of tools in their toolbox to address overuse injuries and dysfunctional movement. This course not only helped me deepen my knowledge of pelvic anatomy, but also how imbalances in the core and pelvis reflect through the kinetic chain.” - Julia Villani, ATC

Ron Hruska will be presenting a free live webinar through the AAPMD, the webinar will be 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM (Central Time). You can register HERE. The webinar is available free of charge if you watch it live, recordings are available to AAPMD members at no charge. Non-members can purchase recordings for $35.00 or 3 for $75.00. Read more about Ron's talk:

You expanded the dental arches, inserted a well fitted oral appliance for sleep and/or TMJ …. the patient is better ….. but something is still missing. It could be airway mal-alignment due to cervical dysfunction, cortical visual processing, asymmetrical postural patterning or a combination of all three. Did you know that the way your airway functions and the way you breathe reflect the foot you like to stand on? The position of the neck affects the airway.

Ron Hruska, founder of the Postural Restoration Institute, will introduce you to new and exciting concepts that incorporate vision, posture, and occlusion for more optimal airway function. Any practitioner treating airway must attend this webinar.

Ron Hruska, MPA, PT, has a strong interest in myokinematic and biomechanical influences on postural and peripheral adaptation patterns. His 32 years of clinical experience assists him with direct patient interventions based on specific examination and evaluation data that best reflects neuromechanical stability, trunk symmetry and respiratory balance. He lectures extensively and consults regularly with physicians, physical therapists, optometrists, dentists, and other health care providers across the United States and internationally on patterned postural position and pathology and his approach of restoring symmetrical balance using PRI principles. His reputation has led to consultations with collegiate and professional athletes from a variety of arenas, states and countries. He is a graduate of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Division of Physical Therapy. He currently is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association. Ron serves as a Biomechanical Consultant to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln through the Division of Athletic Medicine. He has patented Prism and Priori PRI Aquatic systems. He is co-founder of PRI Vision, LLC. He is Director of the Postural Restoration Institute ® and consults and practices at the Hruska Clinic, Restorative Physical Therapy Services, and PRI Vision Clinic in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Posted March 12, 2018 at 8:43PM
Categories: Courses

James and I traveled to Missouri this past weekend to present PRI Integration for Fitness and Movement. Special Thanks to Steve Long and the Complete Fitness Results staff for their wonderful attention and assistance hosting.

Also special thanks to Nancy Hammond, PT, PRC for all her coordination and support getting this course to St. Louis.

We had an AWESOME group! Thank you to all that attended! We introduced the PRI Science and covered key principles to shape trunk stabilization and empower proper grounding and single leg control. Lots of lab time was valued on Sunday. Our focus was dedicated to helping attendees feel and connect with the programming material and learn how to organize the pelvic thorax mechanics to optimize proximal control. This course does a great job tying key concepts together and helping to get our clients moving in and out of movement patterns. So grateful for this group! It really was a great weekend!

Posted March 9, 2018 at 8:32PM
Categories: Courses

I grew up just 4 hours west of the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, both of my parents are University of Minnesota grads, my aunt received her PT degree from U of M, and my mother is born and raised in St. Paul, so I am very familiar with the area. While not a true "home game" for me, I was in familiar surroundings.

The Minneapolis-St. Paul area has long been a hot-bed of PRI interest and practitioners. We had a great mix of professionals who were new to PRI, those who have taken a few PRI courses, and those who have been using the science of PRI for many years. We were very fortunate to have Karen Jiran as one of our lab assistants. Karen was in one of the very first PRC classes, so it was an honor to have her in the class and provide so many awesome answers and examples to the attendees. Our other lab assistant was Brent Albrecht, and he was in one of the very first PRT classes. We were very blessed to have two very experienced PRI practitioners to provide some great context during our discussions and labs.

Our exploration of joint mechanics, ranging from normal, to normal compensation, to abnormal pathological compensation, allowed us to move into the myokinematic discussion of performance based on position. We had great conversations about orthotics, footwear, diaphragm breathing, and how all of those things are directly linked to lumbo-pelvi-femoral mechanics. The value of having the correct "boy band", as well as the value of the hamstring during the gait cycle, were main concepts for our group discussions.

My thanks to Park Nicollet and the entire crew from that facility: Jerusha, Brigid, Laura, Deanne, Patricia, Joanna, Stephanie, and Shraddha. You all were fantastic and were great hosts, and had excellent questions. Thanks to Dr. Kris Zeller-Hack, Mary Spielman, OT, and Brain Kasel, PA-C for their attendance, questions, and interest in PRI. Jacob Talcott, Alissa Granholm, and Wendy Rader were our models during demonstrations, and my thanks to them for allowing us to learn from them. A huge thank you to Lisa Nelson, Tom Stork, Lizanne Pastore, Megan Gohlke, and Robyn Chip for their expert questions and restates, which helped everyone's learning process during the weekend.

Posted March 7, 2018 at 7:39PM
Categories: Courses

Our 10th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium is coming up fast, and over the next few weeks I hope to shed some light on my enthusiasm for this event, so that you don’t miss this opportunity if you have the same interests.  These yearly symposium topics are selected based on experience and interests that developed though my patient interaction and intervention.  The topic selection is further strengthened by what I have read, witnessed, and discovered using lens that have various transparencies.  My perspective on the subject matter always is redefined and refined as I prepare for the symposium and as I work with each presenter and their related background and interest.  As April 19th approaches, I continue to recognize the re-occurrence of asymmetrical patterns of predictable functional and behavioral resistance.  We all “resist” when movement of the contralateral extremity, side, bone, etc. is not sensed moving in the opposite direction, secondary to behavioral resistance.  But we should also be mindful that resistance is required for directed expansion, unraveling, unfolding, respiration and compensation.

I chose the title “Postural Restriction:  An Interdisciplinary Approach to Alignment of Functional Patterns” because of its influence on alignment of malalignment.  Neurodevelopmental alignment, evolutionary alignment, pathologic alignment, inter-relationship alignment, and bi-pedal alignment as related to neurologic tension and soft tissue tension.  There are degrees of resistance in all of this “alignment,” as there are degrees of “malalignment.”  Patterns of resistance and re-tensing resistance guide and regulate us.  We all need resistance for meaningful growth and meaningful freedom.  Revolution sometimes is our only path to freedom, when meaningful growth succumbs to over-resistance.  A balance of tension is therefore, so important to all of us and I really hope this symposium will offer insight on how to achieve balanced resistance in day to day activity.   

In 2009, I read an article written by Matt Wallden, MSc Ost Med, BSc (Hons) Ost Med, CHEK IV , DO,ND who was an Associate Editor of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies and I have been following him and reading his work ever since.  I was so appreciative of his acceptance of our invitation to speak at this year’s Symposium on “The Evolutionary Basis of Tissue Restriction” and “Clinical Assessment and Interventions for Rebalancing the Body with Tissue Restriction.”  Matt lives in Surrey, UK and owns Matt Wallden Health & Performance, where he is clinically active as a C.H.E.K. practitioner, in addition to applying osteopathic and naturopathic philosophy and treatment.  Matt is also on faculty for the C.H.E.K Institute.  Our conversations with him have been so enlightening and I know he is truly looking forward to meeting all of you and integrate his thoughts regarding tissue restriction/resistance to clinical assessment and treatment.  I personally look forward to meeting him and spending time with him and know you will enjoy his delivery and personality.

Our other keynote speaker is also an osteopath and will be giving a presentation on “Archetypal Postures: What They Are and What Can Be Done To Achieve Them” as well as a discussion on “The Contractile Field:  A New Model of Human Movement.”  There is no speaker, writer, or individual who knows this subject material better than Phillip Beach, DO, DAC.  Phillip has a private practice in Wellington, New Zealand. In addition, he has lectured internationally for several years.  In 2010, he wrote a book entitled “Muscles and Meridians – The manipulation of shape.”  I feel so honored that he will be here in Nebraska to discuss relationships between symmetry, asymmetry and handedness as related to our archetypal posture and contractile fields of “default movement” and patterned vertebrates (humans).  I am very excited to hear him talk!  

Well that is a brief reflection….and over the next few weeks, I will continue to reflect on why I chose the other presenters and why they are so instrumental in this interdisciplinary engagement.  

Posted February 27, 2018 at 5:37PM
Categories: Courses

This past weekend I had the pleasure of returning to ATI Physical Therapy in beautiful Everett, WA just outside Seattle. Betsy Baker Bold has been serving PRI as a hub in the greater Seattle area for many years and we at PRI were once again welcomed into her clinic at ATI with open arms for a learning adventure, this time for Myokinematic Restoration. With Erin Rajca, DPT, PRC to assist with lab and Agnes as the backdrop screen for the projector, we had a high quality environment to take in some high quality PRI movement science. Meg Tyner, DPT, ATC, CSCS from New York earned the rockstar award for her ~3,000 mile journey to Seattle!

Matthew Krings, PT, Jaclyn Stoerzbach, DPT, Diane Wiggin, PT, and Stefanie Wren, PT among many others provided thorough and insightful questions regarding asymmetrical polyarticular chains of muscle and how to integrate these and other PRI principles into practice. Thank you Hollie Young, PT, Jonathan Losch, SPT, Michael Murphy, DPT, OCS Kyle LaLiberte, ACSM EP-C, Alexa Degel, DPT and others for your help during the various lab demonstrations of manual and non-manual techniques throughout the course designed to attenuate and balance normally asymmetrical laterality of an AIC pattern.

On Sunday morning we woke to what I understand to be a relatively large snowfall for the area. This group of attentive, enthusiastic learners not only arrived early, but stayed engaged throughout and added to course content with well-considered discussion throughout. This Instructor thoroughly enjoyed dialogue regarding origins of pathology due to compensatory patterns as well as discussions of what, when and how to address post-operative patients with the same symptoms before and after procedures using PRI principles for AF and FA movement.

Thank you again Betsy, Erin, Agnes and the whole crew I learned with this weekend--and Tuline Kinaci, ATC for reminding us all that our traits are as habituated as they are innate. Once again, Seattle wowed me.

Posted February 22, 2018 at 4:39PM
Categories: Courses

It was a refreshing weekend in Albuquerque, NM, for several reasons. Since I had to use my snow blower three times before I left, it was great to see the sun and feel 60 degree weather again. More importantly, it was very refreshing to have the opportunity to explore human patterning and performance with so many individuals new to the science of PRI.

The introduction of the concepts of neutrality and asymmetry started our weekend. And those concepts were followed by why and how does the L AIC pattern develop and become the dominant neuromechanical pattern in our body. And that lead us into our conversation of normal mechanics vs. normal compensatory mechanics vs. pathological mechanics due to this dominant L AIC pattern.

As we moved into myokinematic behavior as a result of the L AIC pattern, Karen Bexfield, PT, asked a great question: why is our focus on the frontal plane? That question helped focus our conversation around the necessity to get out of system extension, either unilaterally or bilaterally. And helped drive our conversation around the idea that if the frontal plane isn't intact, then transverse plane motion will occur in the incorrect location and manner, causing further compensatory patterns, some of which will result in more pathology. When it's time to be "Batman," be "Batman." But when it's time to be "Bruce Wayne," be "Bruce Wayne." And we need to be "Bruce Wayne" much more often on both sides than we currently are.

We were fortunate to have a lot of lab time to focus on the value and application of the Hruska Abduction and Hruska Adduction Lift Tests. We were also very fortunate to be able to spend a lot of time in lab so we could experience several of the non-manual PRI techniques ourselves. The hamstring is the gate keeper of the gait cycle! My thanks to Nathanael Smith, ATC, CSCS, for being a great host and allowing us to use his awesome facility. New Mexico is just starting to gain traction in PRI, and it's exciting to see a facility like Nathanael's adopting PRI concepts. Meeting Nancy Allen , PT, was a real treat for me. She's been exposed to PRI for several years, and it turns out she grew up in South Dakota, not far from where I grew up! Small world!

My thanks to Nancy as well for bringing along her co-workers, Karen Bexfield and Andrea Deyloff, so they could get their first taste of PRI. My thanks to Pat Fraser, PT, for her great questions. Thank you to Alanna Phillips, a PT student, for making the trip for her first PRI exposure. Thanks to Karen Russo, PT, Lukasz Sokol, and Nathanael Smith for letting us use you as our demonstration models. Thank you to Sandra West and Emily Blair, DC, for their enthusiasm and great comments. And thanks to Maritza Castro, ATC, for making the trip all the way from the Dominican Republic for the course!

Posted February 20, 2018 at 8:52PM
Categories: Courses

Giving a PRI course on occlusal positional consideration and occlusal influences on human positional sensorium and pattern was one of the highlights of my career and life. “After 45 years of ‘pre-dental major’ exploration, non-conformist intuitive processing and integrative pattern exposure and recognition and ‘irrational’ clinical appreciation that was built off of ‘effect and cause’ experience, “I was prepared to present ‘post –dental’ reasonings and recommendations. This first power point slide is powerful because it reflects my 45 years of pre-dentistry and the foundations of PRI. It is a course designed for dentists who are interested in patterned occlusion and its relationship to human patterned asymmetrical and functional limitation.

This was the first time I gave this one day course – however, I have been preparing 45 years to discuss spheno-palatine influence on bite patterns, teeth behavior  and personalities, the five meanings of ‘OA’ as related to that frontal plane, occlusal-calcaneal cortical function, and occlusal impact on dynamic freedom.

I want to thank Jen Platt for her ‘first row’ student perspective and advice and for her patience and producer role, that she has perfected over the years of working with this director. Other shout outs to Hannah Janssen for her acting and functional performance and to Matt Hornung for his editing, visual production and camera mastery. Without my comrades at the Hruska Clinic, refinement and resolution of this vast subject matter would be tyrannical. Jason Masek MSPT, ATC, CSCS, PRC, Lori Thomsen MPT PRC, Torin Berge MPT , PRC, Dave Drummer DPT, PRC and Heidi Wise OD, FCOVD. Thank you for your patience, kindness and ongoing support. I love you all so much.

I also want to thank Rebecca Hohl DDS MS, Chris Campbell DDS, Mark Vanicek DDS, Susan Christensen, DDS, and their respective staffs. Without their integrative mindedness and effort, the research that supports the didactic information provided by this course would have limited clinical significance and measurable outcomes.

The feedback and input were invaluable and I am excited for the next opportunity to relate human patterned asymmetrical occlusal contact and referenced sense to the asymmetrical pattern that coincide or contribute to human pattern development and the behavior recognized  by the Postural Restoration Institute

Posted February 16, 2018 at 9:37PM
Categories: Courses

There I was in Hotlanta and as the rain poured down!  40 of us PRI nerds gathered at One On One Physical Therapy and spoke about all things Postural Respiration. I didn’t get to take very many pictures this time around because I was busier than a centipede at a toe-counting contest! Honestly, if I wasn’t answering questions...I was asking MORE questions. This audience was chock full of eager minds and new professionals visiting PRI concepts for the very first time. How honored I was to have the opportunity to go over the complexities of normal and abnormal respiration, the role of the diaphragm as a postural muscle and a respiratory muscle, rib kinematics as they relate to human asymmetry. I had two of my own former employees who are both Postural Restoration Certified (PRC) helping in the labs: Adrian Baker DPT, PRC and Kristin Spencer MPT, PRC. Adrian and Kristin were extremely helpful and valuable assets during the weekend and I am grateful to both of them. One On One Physical Therapy is a great host site and the facility was laid out nicely for a good class. Karen Davis Warren MPT, OCS, OTC made sure we had what we needed and I’m pretty sure she is planning on hosting another PRI course in the future. Present in the audience was Amos Mansfield ATC the head Athletic Trainer at Mercer University in Macon, GA. Amos is hosting Myokinematic Restoration at Mercer on March 3-4 and I would invite all to attend as this course dovetails very well with Postural Respiration. I look forward to seeing you all next month and in continuing PRI courses in the future. Let’s explore the science together!

Posted February 13, 2018 at 8:25PM
Categories: Courses
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