Courses

PRI Gait Analysis of the Accelerated “Asymmetrical” American

1.  The left foot goes through a toe-out gait pattern at early push-off compared to the right.  Secondary to poor abductor co-contraction of adductors and anterior gluteus medius.

2.  The right lower extremity externally rotates more overall than the left.  During swing because of overactive iliacus and during stance because of innominate orientation of legs and trunk to the right.

3.  The right heel lifts early at mid-stance compared to the left and at push-off.  Secondary to longer interval of right weight acceptance and trunk glide and longer shorter swing and ‘stride’ with left leg.

4.  The femurs significantly internally rotate at push-off.  At late mid stance and trunk glide phases innominates are forwardly rotated too much contributing to FA IR orientation or position.  Especially seen in hyperextended individuals. 

5.  There appears to be a higher ‘active’ mid foot arch on the right at mid stance.  Secondary to overactive, shortened strong right adductor influence on foot and ankle.

6.  No sufficient resupination of the left foot occurs after midstance to stabilize or “lock” the tarsus in the sagittal plane and allow for efficient propulsion.  Contributed by weak right acetabular femoral external rotational strength.

7.  The right 1st metatarsal is not secure in plantar-flexion against the ground during forefoot loading.  Contributed by C.O.G. over-distributed to the right and overactive left TFL during swing. 

8.  The right 1st MTP joint does not dorsiflex freely for forward gait progression without compensatory dorsiflexion from smaller toes and shifting of COG to the right.  Secondary to forefoot and possibly rearfoot varus and overactive posterior gluteus medius and iliacus. 

9.  The right arm does not move forward upon right toe-off.  Secondary to poor left lateral abdominal integration and overactive right thoracic abductors reinforcing right arm adduction. 

10.  The left shoulder does not drop upon left toe-off.  Contributed by weak left gluteus medius and left lateral abdominals at late mid stance or trunk glide. 

Posted March 26, 2009 at 7:10PM
Categories: Courses

Our first annual Interdisciplinary Integration course is fast approaching!  The course is scheduled to begin next week, Thursday March 26th, and conclude on Sunday March 29th.  Between now and the start of the course we will be busy here at PRI placing thefinal touches on the course material.  If you have already registered for this course, we look forward to seeing you!  If you are not registered and are interested in attending, please contact us

Posted March 16, 2009 at 7:12PM
Categories: Courses

Please join us March 28th for Postural Restoration - A One Day Clinical Course.  If you have taken Myokinematic Restoration or Postural Respiration and would like to spend a day learning how to clinically apply the PRI knowledge you have gained, this is the course for you!  Registration deadline is this Friday, March 13th.  Please contact us if you would like to register!

Posted March 10, 2009 at 7:14PM
Categories: Courses

I am so excited about the upcoming four day Interdisciplinary Integration course.  Heather Engelbert and I, will be talking about Pelvic Floor Dysfunction.  Position is key for these muscles to work as they were intended for organ support and sphincter control.  We have the asymmetrical pelvis broken down into left and right with relationships of the “adductor, hamstring and glute max” of the pelvic floor.  Exciting stuff! We have developed a hierarchy of treatment with PRI principles and new exercises to show you!  We will also discuss when it’s appropriate to refer to a pelvic floor specialist for an internal exam and integration with other health care professionals.  We hope to see you there!

Posted March 2, 2009 at 8:22PM
Categories: Courses

Day Four...What’s new in the PRI curricular future? The pelvic floor- like never discussed before. Heather Engelbert, PT, PRC and Lori Thomsen, PT, PRC will bring you up to date on the importance of establishing a well-positioned pelvic floor, before addressing pelvic floor dysfunction. Ironically, the timing of my pregnancy fit perfectly with our need for a PRI model for this course so you’ll be seeing me in many of the ‘new’ PRI pelvic floor non-manual techniques. Applying a PRI myokinetic format to the pelvic floor anatomy is exciting in itself, but to integrate these concepts with the respiratory system is even more rewarding. What an uplifting way to end the four days!

Posted February 23, 2009 at 5:58PM
Categories: Courses

Day Three...how about going back to school to learn about vision and its influence on patterned balance and the vestibular system? Ron Hruska will start off by giving an overview on how working with optometrists has helped him establish timely, good neuro-mechanical postural change, complimenting Postural Restoration Institute goals of improving reciprocal balance and function. A didactic day of functional optokinetic learning. Learn about associated vision and vestibular patterns of people who rely on back and neck extension, and their right extremities. Dr. James Nedrow’s discussion about neuro-optometry in the treatment of visual midline shift and post traumatic visual dysfunction will enlighten any professional who treats patients with dizziness, headaches and perceptual issues. Both Dr. Nedrow and Ron are members of NORA, the Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association, and see eye-to-eye on the need for increased vision-vestibular integration in the future of orthopedic, neurologic, pediatric and geriatric treatment programs. What an ‘eye-opening’ day!

Posted February 22, 2009 at 5:59PM
Categories: Courses

Day Two...you can expect to hear a passionate dentist talk about the importance of temporal mandibular disc position on maintaining cranial symmetry.  His unique approach to treating craniofacial pain and dental discrepancies through a gnathic orthopedic positioning approach has complimented Ron Hruska’s approach of reducing neuromuscular patterns of the ‘head, neck face’, through integrative muscle and respiratory re-positioning.  The two have been working together for over two years and have successfully integrated unconventional cranial and postural methods to maintain a cranial, occlusal and cervical-thoracic lumbar stability.  I see this as a great opportunity for a physical and occupational therapist and podiatrist to recognize the opportunities and the rewards of working with dentistry in establishing postural alignment or neutrality of the head, neck and trunk.  Dentists should feel more comfortable working with physical and occupational therapists and podiatrists, knowledgeable about the Postural Restoration Institute philosophies, after taking this course.  What a ‘team’ day!

Posted February 20, 2009 at 6:03PM
Categories: Courses

As the Interdisciplinary Integration course approaches, I thought I would provide some timely input and updates.  Our speakers are excited about this event and are working on each of their presentations and trying to condense their material down to one day.  Since there will be a different speaker each day, I thought I would provide some insight on how each unique day will “feel”. 

Day One...could be compared to our ‘Technique of the Week’.  If you are interested in why an orthotic is important for challenging habitual postural and gait patterns, or what purpose a PRI orthotic serves in reducing neuromotor pathomechanics, or when should you consider using specific orthotics and muscle integration to establish PRI outcomes, or who specifically should experience specific support from a specific appropriate footwear, you should think about where you are going to be that day.  Dr. Paul Coffin, Ron Hruska and Ann Riglein have been working together for more than 8 years, what more can I say.

Posted February 19, 2009 at 6:05PM
Categories: Courses

For those of you spreading the word about our first annual Interdisciplinary Integration course, the course brochure has been completed.  If you would like to print off a copy to handout to a colleague, click here.  If you would like us to mail you or someone you know a brochure, join our mailing list.  We are very excited about this upcoming course!

Posted January 29, 2009 at 5:32PM
Categories: Courses

I’m sure you’ve all seen this before!  Want to learn how to treat these common patterns of asymmetry associated with ‘instability’and ‘impingement’?  Come join us in Yankton, South Dakota, February 7-8 for the Impingement and Instability course!  Late registration fee has been waived, contact us for details!

Posted January 15, 2009 at 6:23PM
Categories: Courses
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