Posts by Ron Hruska

The cortical, pre-frontal lobe and temporal power that was in the room at this last weekend’s course in Phoenix at East Valley Spine and Sports Medicine was unbelievable!!  The 25 class attendees had close to 200 PRI courses behind them.  Some of them had taken 15 to 16 courses prior to this one.  We rolled through TMCC with constant and consistent integrated thinking that will help with the revisions that will be made for the upcoming Cervical Revolution: An Integrated Approach to the Treatment of Patterned Cervical Rotation, being taught in early 2015. Thank you East Valley Spine and Sports Medicine for a wonderful weekend of cranial “ expansion” and for your ongoing hospitality over the years with all the PRI courses you host!

Posted October 23, 2014 at 10:16PM
Categories: Courses

John Nyland did a nice job commenting on sports specialization in his editorial article in the June issue of JOSPT. If you have access to this article, be sure to take a look at it. Experiencing diversification in "physical, cognitive, affective and psychosocial environments" at all ages, probably also contributes to transfer of learning between cognitive, psychobehavioral and physical neurological processes.

Posted June 23, 2014 at 9:42PM
Categories: Athletics Articles

I just recently finished reading "It's a Jungle In There" by David Rosenbaum. This cognitive psychology overview, with a Darwinian perspective, touched on 'perceiving more than is really there'. Phenomena often reflect "top-down" processing. The term refers to high-level interpretation biasing perception, so perception is not just dictated by immediate sensory data or "bottom-up" processing, but is also shaped by expectations. Over-competition and under-cooperation among relevant neural representatives can bias perception.

The last course I taught in Richmond, VA was Cervical-Cranio-Mandibular Restoration, and it was attended by a number of 'neural representatives' that were once "bottom-up" processors and are now "top-down" perceivers. I really enjoyed their cooperation and non-competitive communication!

Posted May 28, 2014 at 7:23PM
Categories: Clinicians Books

This was the second time that I had the pleasure of teaching at Finish Line Physical Therapy in New York City, and I am always grateful for their genuine appreciation and interest in PRI. After a weekend of Postural Respiration, I know most of them will not forget how to integrate left abdominals with left posterior mediastinum and right lateral thoracic expansion. I hope they became "lifted" as much as they "lifted" me on a wonderful rainy weekend in New York!

Posted April 2, 2014 at 2:27PM
Categories: Courses

This is one title of a slide from the many that Susan Henning will use to present historical perspectives and current overviews on how to slow, halt, or reverse spinal curve progression. She has a strong experienced-based background on this subject and her presentation is already preceded by her clinical passion and genuine caring personality. Susan’s willingness to share her story about two complimentary programs in a manner that will help you better explain to a young person the reason for curve patterns and “trunk changes”, is a gift to us. I know no other person like Susan, that can facilitate a proprioceptive, kinesthetic, and respiratory self awareness attitude or a self-correcting program like Susan can. This, in my opinion, will be the hallmark of our 2014 symposium!

Registration is still available for the upcoming 6th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium, being held April 10-11, 2014. CLICK HERE learn more and get registered today!

Posted March 25, 2014 at 6:29PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians

After reviewing Emily's presentation material, attendees will learn how to drive their diaphragm and therefore control both gravitational forces and barometric forces. This physical therapist and yoga teacher will explore the ancient concepts and modern application of yoga breathing techniques (pranayama) to help the PRI clinician fully experience and appreciate the power of the diaphragm contraction. She will offer guidance and suggestions that can immediately be implemented into a client's work out program to maximize respiratory and performance awareness. I can't wait for this uplifting two hour talk!

There is still space available for the 6th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium. To register, CLICK HERE!

Posted March 21, 2014 at 1:00PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians

In May of 2006, I taught a Postural Respiration course in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  I met Julie Hereford for the first time at that course and was in awe of her knowledge on the subject of sleep.  She was asked to be a presenter at the 2010 PRI Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium and along with Dr. J. Paul Rutledge, they introduced sleep to us like no one had before.  Dr. Julie Hereford, PT, DPT has now published a book that will provide rehabilitation professionals with a source of information that will help them gain a better understanding of sleep and its impact on the rehabilitation process.  If you want to know how sleep can increase cortisol levels or reduce glucose tolerance or increase sympathetic nervous system activity, you will enjoy this read.  Dr. Hereford has always been an advocate of sleep being tied to consolidation of motor learning.  “It follows that dysfunctional sleep may interfere with the ability to incorporate particular restorative movement patterns that are learned and practiced during a rehabilitation session unless the appropriate stage of sleep is achieved within a specific time frame.”  I believe the reader and clinician will not be disappointed with any of the four sections of this book and will be introduced to disordered sleep as it relates to systemic challenging disease and dysfunctional patterns.  Therefore, Sleep and Rehabilitation: A Guide for Health Professionals is a must for book shelves of those who appreciate the need for sleep and its intricate effects on performance.

Posted February 25, 2014 at 7:47PM
Categories: Clinicians Books

A PRI course attendee, Lilla Marhefka sent me this recent article on the right diaphragm function in subjects experiencing chronic low back pain with structural spine disorders and in those who have no history of low back pain or structural disorders (control group). Diaphragm motion and shape was recorded from MRI recordings when postural demands on the body were increased (hip flexion demands were increased). A statistical analysis showed that the diaphragm respiratory and postural changes were significantly slower, bigger in size and better balanced in the control group.  When a load was applied to the lower limbs, the pathological subjects were mostly not able to maintain the respiratory diaphragm function, which was lowered significantly. Subjects from the control group showed more stable parameters of both respiratory and postural function. In their conclusion, the researchers state that the facts also support the ability of the diaphragm to play a key role in maintaining the good stability of the trunk. It is also important that they were able to separate the phases of diaphragm movement.  Postural motions of the diaphragm could predict dispositions to vertebrogenic problems or could help when seeking to correct these problems. This is an excellent research study that supports PRI philosophy and principles. Thank you Lilla!

Posted May 29, 2013 at 9:35PM
Categories: Articles

Lucy McKee, who is currently in one of her final physical therapy clinical rotations at the Hruska Clinic did a wonderful job of explaining how Postural Restoration is evidence based in our treatment approach with the A-B-A single subject experimental design in her recent blog. I couldn’t agree more with Lucy, and her patient case examples are great. CLICK HERE to read more about why testing and re-testing is so important in our assessment and treatment!

Posted April 5, 2013 at 7:23PM
Categories: Clinicians

This week’s featured speaker for our 5th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium is Ken Crenshaw. A native of New Mexico, Crenshaw graduated from New Mexico State University with a degree in sports medicine and worked as an athletic trainer in the Pittsburgh Pirates organization for three years and as the strength and conditioning coordinator with the Atlanta Braves for four years before heading to Tampa Bay for 10 years. In December 2005, Crenshaw was named the Head Athletic Trainer for the Arizona Diamondbacks. He is a certified member of the National Athletic Trainers Association and the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

“After meeting Ken Crenshaw in 2008, at an educational course that I presented to his staff, he sent me an article written by Pavel Kolar, a mentor of his and mine. Since that time, he has sent me several articles and emails on everything from the diaphragm to neurology as it relates to stabilization and integrating function. He has so much experience and wisdom. What were we thinking when we scheduled him to speak for only 2 hours?” - Ron Hruska

For more information and to register for this upcoming Annual Symposium, in which this year’s featured topic is Athletic Performance, CLICK HERE!

Posted March 26, 2013 at 7:48PM
Categories: Athletics Courses
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