Posts by Ron Hruska

This week’s featured speaker for our 5th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium is John Cook. Cook is entering his 13th season as the head volleyball coach at the University of Nebraska –Lincoln. Prior to becoming the head coach at Nebraska, he was the head coach at the University of Wisconsin. Cook also has Olympic and championship experience in his coaching resume. During his tenure at Nebraska, I have had the opportunity to work with John and his team as the Biomechanical Consultant for the University of Nebraska Volleyball team.

“What goes on behind any successful athletic program is leadership. For the last 13 years, I have had the good fortune to work with John Cook, his coaches, support staff, and the team of individuals that have made the volleyball athletes he develops well-rounded, disciplined and ‘complete’. John’s passion for interconnectivity will ‘fire up’ the course attendees on the morning of the second day. Get your seat early!”

Posted February 25, 2013 at 3:25PM
Categories: Courses Athletics

“This course was a good course from a standpoint that there were beginners, intermediates and veterans of PRI in the room - which is a blessing for everyone in attendance, including the speaker! The attendees in the room who were still trying to put the “pieces” together really helped strengthen the Guidelines for Right BC Treatment document. These suggestions and recommendations have been recognized and will benefit all future course attendees. Thank you Sioux Falls for a great weekend!”

Posted January 31, 2013 at 4:26PM
Categories: Courses

Recently, two PRC therapist’s spent time integrating with and educating groups of dentists across the country. Mike Cantrell, MPT, PRC presented at a Dental Conference in Atlanta, GA in November, while Kathy Johnson, PT, PRC recently had the opportunity to spend a couple weeks at the Pankey Institute in Florida, serving as guest faculty for their TMD II course. Kathy provided this blog entry on New Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Integration. Kathy’s comments in this blog reflect the openness many dentists have regarding the need to balance oral function and posture. The neck and the mandible compensate for functional malocclusion, just as the teeth accommodate for cervical-cranial unilateral patterns of function. Without obtaining, recognizing and achieving cervical-cranio-mandibular neutrality, as the neuro-muscular adaptation to unfamiliar occlusion is established, both the dentist and the physical therapist outcomes will be challenging at best. Maintaining a PRI reference between offices is highly recommended. These two professions have so much in common where and when neuro-muscular position and postural influences are considered. Thank you Mike and Kathy for your efforts in integrating PRI with these groups of dentists! - Ron

Posted January 2, 2013 at 6:22PM

Wishing you all a happy and healthy New Year!
-Ron and the entire staff of PRI

Posted December 31, 2012 at 9:24PM

I was recently asked by an attendee at the Advanced Integration course why I chose the color Purple to represent the Postural Restoration Institute.
Purple/Violet is a color of purpose and good judgment. It is associated with individual linkage and integration to the universe. It symbolizes magic and mystery. It is the color purple that represents those seeking spiritual fulfillment and those who have a peace of mind…therefore, it is our Institute color and the color that reflects PRI muscle responsible for internal rotation of bones that require internal direction for fullest beneficial use.

Put some purple in your life when you want:
• To use your imagination to its fullest
• To re-balance your life
• To remove obstacles
• To calm or inhibit over-activity
• To become inspired

Posted December 28, 2012 at 9:29PM

Marriage is more than a union of two people. It is a time where two people come together, and usually four people have to let go. My brother, two weeks ago handed his first daughter’s hand over to his new son in law, and admitted, it was the hardest thing he ever has done. Maybe not as hard as letting go of the bicycle she was riding as a little girl, as he ran beside her, and as she took those first few yards solely, without her father’s hand on the bike. But, he let go. He struck my emotional cords when he asked everyone at this wedding to remember it will be tough for him to truly “let go”, in this situation, even though she is safe and loved; because he is her father. 

Letting go of something that depends on you, something you love and you reference most of your life, does not happen overnight. It takes courage, trust and repetitive replacement to minimize future unwanted co-dependency.

There are a number of muscles that our human patterned body needs to let go. I have selected those specific muscles and regions that we need to learn to inhibit, minimize, and basically let go. I also selected the PRI non-manual inhibition technique that allows one to really focus and find other reference centers so that they can let go. These new reference centers may not be the handle bars of a bicycle or the arms of a spouse, but they are there waiting for us if we learn to “let go”.

CLICK HERE to see Ron’s selected PRI techniques to help you “let go”. Please note that some of these are new techniques which will be included on the upcoming new CD collection!

Posted September 14, 2012 at 3:24PM

I always look forward to receiving the Journal of Craniomandibular Practice every quarter.  The Guest Editorial of the July issue was Brendon Stack D.D.S., M.S.  Needless to say, I was more interested in his editorial comments, than the excellent information in this issue that was devoted to the ear.  Dr. Stack outlined his “journey” of treating patients “from orthodontics to craniofacial pain and then to movement disorders.”  He reflects on how his underlying treatment philosophy evolved into the fact that many, but not all, of the movement disorder patients had underlying internal derangement of the cranium which results in abnormal maxillomandibular relationships. He recalls how for over a century, Tourette’s syndrome was considered a psychological disorder, a neurological brain disorder and then an infectious disease caused by streptococcus. It was never considered a disorder that was due to a structural abnormality, which then could manifest itself as a neurological problem. Dr. Stack pointed out that today Tourette’s is considered a “structural – reflex disorder”  that responds well to the use of intraoral orthotics that require no medicine or surgery. 

As the result of the success in his treatment of Tourette’s, he applied the same principles to the treatment of Parkinson’s, cervical torticollis, and other types of “movement disorders.” He feels that the “motor component” of the movement disorder is the key to his 47 year journey of treating cranio-related pain through “repositioning”, “decompression” and reprogramming to “eliminate noxious input through the fifth cranial nerve into the central nervous system.”  After 32 years of practice, I believe in this approach and belong to a similar patterned journey. I just hope that in the next 15 years, I don’t change my “ position”  behavior, so that I too, can reflect on my 47 years and report that my journey was “ filled with learning and personal satisfaction of having made a difference in the lives of my patients.” 

Posted August 21, 2012 at 3:43PM

Would you like to know what Ron was thinking during his Saturday morning coffee? Check out his blog below, as he shares some thoughts!

The last patient of my week, on last Friday, was a 19 year old young man that was referred to me for anterior shin pain and chronic shin “splints”.  He had a history of back pain and is a runner and was an avid hockey player.  He reports when he doesn’t do anything, his anterior shin pain does not bother him.  He has been to every specialist possible for this type of problem, except by someone who has taken a PRI course or is trained or certified in PRI.

The first thing I read in my Saturday local paper, over a cup of coffee, was an article written by a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. “Give shin splints time to heal” was the title of the article.  Needless to say, after reading the article, I had a hard time finishing my coffee, and I could feel my body begin to “splint”.  The physician reported that shin splints develop because of overuse of the posterior tibialis muscle in the lower leg near the shin.  He did mention that shin splints can be caused by tibial stress fractures.  His advice; rest, ice, compress, elevate and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.  As the pain gradually goes away, start with a walking program.  Accordingly, if you return to your training too early or too intense your shin splint may come back.  He goes on to talk about the need for warm ups, to use the 10 percent rule or not to increase time or intensity of your workouts more than 10 percent per week, and to strengthen the muscles around you “lower” legs and ankles.  In his opinion, “Many great runners have experienced shin splints, rested the muscle and gone on to glory.”  This syndicate writer did not mention what a shoe orthotic, a good supportive shoe, a biomechanical oriented program for the upper leg including the pelvis and hips, or a myokinematic program for transverse plane stability at the femur or calcaneus might do for this “splint” pain.

The word “splint” according to Webster, means ‘a rigid device used to prevent motion of a joint or the ends of a fractured bone’.  When one is splinting they are in a feed forward process.  Pain does not allow one to relax and therefore makes one ‘splint’.  The pain, may subside if they do nothing.  However, that does not address the neurologic feed forward system issues because the dysfunctional torsion on the bone has not been addressed. 

My Friday afternoon patient did well with a PRI approach and actually could alter his shin splint pain after his left AIC, right BC and right TMCC patterns were considered.  The torsion on his tibial bone appeared to be coming from a right forward shoulder and the lack of a left posterior mediastinum, an extended postural pattern that was reinforced by a former head injury, and a deep lordotic back (40 to 50 degrees of straight leg raise).  He felt his shin “splints” come and go in the clinic when he learned how to move over his left hip properly, flex his thorax and lumbar spine correctly with ambulation and visually see and feel the ground in front of him, appropriately. 

My Monday morning cup of coffee was more enjoyable, only because this message allowed me to splint a little less.  Thank you.

Posted July 30, 2012 at 7:46PM

Each of the PRI courses take on a personality, over time. Of course this personality can be modified by the speaker who is presenting or the people in attendance. After presenting the Myokinematic course material a few weeks ago, I realize how important our basic courses are and how important they are in providing the ground and foundation for all the other courses. I also appreciate, now more than ever, the need for guidelines and boundaries from each of our courses and each of our speakers. The one course that provides the most clinical guidelines and references for system flexion maintenance and symmetrical integrity, is the Impingement and Instability course.  This course offers historical reference and allows the attendee to reflect on those events that shaped and developed their “check” points and stability limits.

When I was young, I would occasionally walk the railroad tracks to town. I would see how far I could go, placing one foot in front of another on a steel non-ending beam, before I would fall off. I would never quite get over the bridge however, walking on one rail. There is something about a train rail, going across a bridge, that would always throw my calcaneus and foot arches off in my worn leather high top farm shoes. I learned early that vision influenced the foot and balance. When your system wobbles the feet become marbles. 

I also will never forget how nervous my wife and I were when we let our oldest daughter finally ride her bike around the block without us. This seven year old took off and was never to cross a street. A maiden voyage. At the first corner there was the big oak tree that we walked and rode around many time prior to this sole expedition. At the second corner there was the dilapidated boat and at the third corner there was the fire hydrant. Will she remember the oak tree, the boat and the hydrant? Although I am not as nervous about my patients ability to remember the left hamstring, the left adductor or the left gluteus medius as I was for my little girl’s safety around her block she lived on, I am pretty nervous when a patient can’t feel these muscles or their left ischial tuberosity. 

After attending a wedding reception this weekend I reflected on the biblical story on how God created a woman from a man’s rib. A rib! What a wonderful guidance center. (I wonder if a left one was used or a right one. Can’t wait to ask.) None the less, the ribs are attachment sites for highly integrated abdominals, scapulas and diaphragms.

Aren’t door ways great? We occasionally run into them, hit them inadvertently, close the door hard on them when we are mad, etc. and without them we could never enter a room. They provide contact boundaries in the middle of the night and guidance for a closing door, just like our anterior and posterior hip capsules. When we slam into them we know it.

Rail road beams, city block markers, ribs and doorways all have personalities. They direct our attention, are an allusion to an occurrence or a situation, and indirectly in some cases, and directly in others, become pointed and meaningful, just like the posterior calcaneus, the middle arch of our feet, the ischial tuberosities, the lateral abdominals and the hip capsules. Thank God we have them, other wise we would be in “time out” because of the inflammatory process would constantly take over and situational instability would be inherent. These life long reference center personalities need to be recognized and correctly used regularly. When did you check in with your reference centers, and when did they check you?

Posted February 21, 2012 at 4:53PM

It’s raining here in Nebraska and as I walk on the slippery, wet surfaces I can’t help but reflect on how our patient’s must feel when they can’t feel their heels strike or sense what centering over a lower extremity is all about, because of uni-planar learned behavior and lateralization in their attempt to move without falling.  What a difference left heel strike made on the waterlogged path I was on this morning.  I could walk from place to place and dodge the wettest surfaces without locking up my back, my knees or my spatial perspective.  I feel blessed to understand the importance of left AF IR and right trunk rotation so that my reciprocal respiration and peripheral vision can remain peripatetic. 

Posted May 20, 2011 at 8:19PM
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