Posts by Ron Hruska

Message from Ron: Our ability to execute purposeful, controllable and stable movement often depends on how we use or do not use our teeth for occlusal reference.  On the second day of this year’s Spring Symposium, Elizabeth Caughey, DDS will present her perspectives on how to use dental occlusion to free up or retrain over-stabilizing muscle of the head and neck.  Her presentation will enlighten anyone who wants to know more about bite splints that can positively destabilize over used or programmed muscles of the neck through re-programming effort from the masticatory system and proprioception received from the teeth.  Elizabeth is an energetic practitioner and I feel so honored to have her speak on a topic that she is so passionate about.  I am sure she will enlighten us on how to work with dentists who are interested in reducing neck tension that often correlates with facial pain.

Elizabeth's Talk:

Deprogramming versus Destabilization: A Dentist’s Perspective on Effective Splint Design

For years dentists have treated facial pain with bite splints of every design. This talk will compare the limitations of simple dental deprogramming, against the greater goals of destabilization necessary to reduce cervical tension.  We will also cover key elements of splint design needed to awaken the dental sense organ and masticatory system, for the purposes of informing the body of proprioception and how to move through space.

Register for Interdisciplinary Integration

Posted February 3, 2017 at 4:34PM

Message from Ron:

I have been following Benoît Bardy and reading his work and materials for a number of years and am personally looking forward to hearing him discuss how our patients use “self-produced” and “environmental” information to stabilize or destabilize postural synergies.   There have been so many instances in my life where the need to destabilize a dynamic movement pattern preceded the need for stabilizing a pattern that appears to exist because of weakness.   Benoît has a gift to interface the unique individual characteristics of postural control (motor signature) to the same individual’s characteristics of social interaction and response to the “existence” of others.   His work will have an impact on how we look at social interactions that may be restraining ideal movement and motor “synchronization”.  Just this verbiage gets me excited!

Benoît's Talks:

Information-Induced Destabilization of Posture and Movement

In this presentation, the role of information in the (de-)stabilization of postural dynamics will be addressed. I will present the postural system as a complex dynamical system composed of many interacting degrees of freedom, giving rise at the behavioral level to functional, adaptive, and efficient postural synergies. I will show how endogenous (i.e., self-produced) and exogenous (i.e., from the environment) information can be used to modulate the postural system for functional purposes, for instance during learning and rehabilitation. Illustrations will include (i) vision-based rehabilitation of posture after stroke, (ii) coupling of sound and posture during standing, (iii) music-induced stabilization of walking and running in both healthy participants and patients suffering from Parkinson's Disease.

Interpersonal Synchronization of Posture and Movement

The coordination between body segments during standing and walking, or between the body and the environment, has classically been studied individually. However, social interactions are essential parts of our daily life, and they constraint the way we stand or move in a group. In this presentation, I will review the recent literature on interpersonal coordination of posture and movement — the study of motor synchronization between people, and will illustrate the circular relation between postural control and social rapports: the way we stand and move in a group influences, and is in return influenced by, our social interactions. Recent results will be presented showing in various postural synchronization tasks the existence of individual motor signatures (IMS), how these IMS are influenced by the presence of others, and the way technology can be used to facilitate postural synchronization. The consequences for the rehabilitation of patients suffering from social disorders (schizophrenia, autism, social phobia) will be addressed.

Bio:

Benoît G. Bardy earned his B.S., M.S., and PhD (1991) in Movement Sciences at the University of Marseille in France. He was awarded a Georges Lurcy fellowship and a NATO postdoctoral fellowship to continue his research on perception and action in virtual reality at Brown University in Rhode Island, USA. Upon completion of the fellowship he returned to Marseille and worked as a lecturer in Movement Sciences, developing research on perception-action and postural control. Selected as a new professor at the University of Paris (Paris-Sud) in 1999, he created there a Research Center in Sport Sciences, and entered the Institut Universitaire de France as a junior member (2001-2006). In 2005, Benoît returned to the south of France and founded a few years later EuroMov, the new European center for research, technology and innovation in movement sciences (www.euromov.eu). EuroMov is a new concept in the country, at the crossover between fundamental and clinical sciences, technological development, and health-oriented entrepreneurship. Today the center welcomes in a brand new (2500 m2) building located in Montpellier around 100 researchers, engineers, and entrepreneurs from 12 countries collaborating on various scientific and R&D projects related to Movement for Health, in general. The center hosts iMose – Interactive MOtion Simulator at EuroMov – the largest motion-based simulator in France (http://euromov.eu/project/i-mose-lab/). In 2012, Benoît was re-inducted into the Institut Universitaire de France (IUF, 22th promotion) as a senior member.

Benoît’s research is concerned with dynamical approaches to problems of coordination and control of movement, in real and virtual situations, with a particular interest for personalized technology-oriented rehabilitation. Benoît is the author of 200+ scientific articles and 380+ lectures, communications, and conferences worldwide. He is the current coordinator (2013-2016) of two large-scaled European research projects. ALTEREGO (www.euromov.eu/alterego) develops innovative rehabilitation methods to improve relational deficits of patients suffering from social disorders using virtual reality and humanoid robotics. BEAT-HEALTH (www.euromov.eu/beathealth) exploits the tight link between music and movement and delivers embodied, flexible, and personalized rhythmical auditory stimulation (RAS) in order to enhance health (walking in PD patients) and wellness (Running across the lifespan).

Benoît is consulting expert and an evaluator for the H2020 research program of the European Commission.

Register: To register log in and go here.

Posted January 26, 2017 at 9:50PM
Categories: Courses

The Postural-Visual Integration course will only be offered on two occasions prior to the 9th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium scheduled on April 20-21, 2017. By attending the Postural-Visual Integratoin course, you will gain a better understanding on how vision influences the centering of body mass when in a single stance, and how over-focusing influences foot placement. This information will enhance the processing and application of information provided at the Spring Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium on Induced Destabilization, Interpersonal Synchronization and Depatterning through Visual Perspectives. You therefore may want to consider attending a Postural-Visual Integration course in early 2017 in either Chapel Hill, NC on Feb 4-5th, or Minneapolis, MN on Mar 11-12th, if you are planning on attending the 9th Annual Interdisciplinary Symposium and have not yet taken the Postural-Visual Integration course.

Posted December 28, 2016 at 5:29PM

Phoenix Satisfaction

Teaching in Phoenix, in November, is always a treat for a Nebraskan.  Teaching at the Seattle Mariners Training Complex makes the experience even sweeter, because of their hospitality.   And teaching Cervical Revolution to a group of attendees who ask great questions on how to make sense out of “sense” is even more satisfying.  This group worked each other and worked off each other.   There was a good mixture of disciplines that all appreciated the need for temporal-occipital and maxillary-sphenoid rotational correspondence.   The demonstrations put on by Tiffany Enache DPT and James Wittekind PT, DPT helped everyone better understand the influences that Standing Cervical-Cranial Repositioning and Standing Alternating Reciprocal Cranial Expansion can have on occlusion and sphenoid orientation.  I truly enjoyed explaining how a persistent LAIC and RBC patterned individual may be receiving false information from periodontal ligament and teeth that reflect a RTMCC pattern. 

Posted November 18, 2016 at 9:50PM

On October 15th  I gave a course in Fort Collins, CO at Rebound Sports and Physical Therapy. I especially enjoyed this particular course because of the questions regarding compensation, thanks Tyler Moos; because of the dentists in the room who added so much to the overview of occlusal relationships, thanks Dr. Kim Okamura and Dr. Kingdon Brady; because of the questions regarding treatment decision making and treatment intervention with patients who are in a cervical muscle pattern that relates to cranial position and mal-position, thanks Rob Lynde and Tim Richardt; and because of the host site hospitality, thanks Jon Hartwick and Craig Depperschmidt.

 I enjoy discussing how occlusion, spinal orientation and cranial osseous position can influence how the neck moves, or does not move. Spinal, cranial bone, tooth to tooth, and atlas on occiput as well as occiput on atlas coupling, can all be disconnected, neurologically and mechanically, if our cranial decompression/compression, inhalation/exhalation, or flexion/extension does not remain rhythmical.

The rhythmic flow of information, as complex as it can become, was enforced by the genuine interest of the entire class. This was a fun class to teach because this similar theme of rhythmicity was represented by both the class and the class material.

Posted October 26, 2016 at 6:02PM

On September 9th and 10th I went to IMPACT Physical Medicine and Aquatic Center in Minneapolis to present Cervical Revolution. It was so good for my heart and soul. In 2004, I met a gentleman named Stan Babel with a multi-disciplinary thinking spirit. Stan has a mind that complimented my mindful behavior. After all, at that time the Institute was only 3 years strong. His demeanor, sincerity and outlook on life reinforced my drive to continue to grow an interdisciplinary culture. The mediocre mind is incapable of understanding the man who refuses to bow blindly to conventional prejudice and chooses instead to express his opinions courageously and honestly. Mr Babel courageously had the first PRI Aquatics pool built in Texas, shipped it to Minneapolis, knocked a hole in the side of a building and created a “stir” of excitement with PRI Aquatic based concepts.

I’ve learned so much from him over the years and it all began with genuine honesty and trust. Therefore, giving this course and getting an opportunity to see this pool again was so rewarding for me. The IMPACT staff’s dedication to interdisciplinary mindedness is at the heart of what makes PRI. I asked Jen how many course attendees from IMPACT have attended PRI courses over the years; her response was “definitely over 20” and many of them are certified and have taken multiple courses.  Minneapolis/ St Paul was the first real PRI “hub”.  We are so indebted to these people.  I love them all, I enjoyed teaching material that is related to the neck and that also reflects their work, passion and, yes, their pool.

“Great spirits have always encountered opposition from mediocre minds.” –Albert Einstein

Posted September 16, 2016 at 7:18PM

Having Bill Hartman, Mike Robertson and Eric Oetter sit in the first row of any course I instruct is not only an honor, but it's like drinking coffee all day. They change, drive and motivate me to give the best course I can, only because their genuine interest in deepening concepts, therapy philosophies, and neuro-mechanical relationships organized. I always feel welcomed and appreciated. According to Jen Platt they have hosted at least six of our courses and they treat every faculty member and course attendee as one of their “family” members. The diversity of the attendees always reflects the culture of the class and this weekend was so rewarding for me personally because of the questions, interest and diverse reasoning for PRI application. Thank you IFAST, again, for a divergent weekend with course attendees that heard a discussion about a cervical complex that has finite limits.

Posted August 31, 2016 at 7:39PM

I have the pleasure of teaching Postural Respiration at Finish Line Physical Therapy in New York City on August 13-14. I love NYC for many reasons….but no one is more hospitable than the people at Finish Line. Michael Conlon is the epitome of the word “host”. The material that I presented was the same presentation that I wrote and gave in 1995, before the Postural Restoration Institute was created. It was material based off my study of the cranium, neck and respiration. Its origional1998 PRI course name was Postural Restoration, however I renamed it Postural Respiration in 2004 because of the strong connection of respiratory influence on postural restoration. Not only do I love NYC, but I love teaching this course anywhere, especially when there are “new” PRI course attendees in the classroom. There were 23 “new” course attendees present! Explaining how “over rotation” of a set of ribs can resist movement on a transverse or frontal plane is about as wonderful as hugging my four year old grandson who lives a few blocks down from Finish Line! Thanks for bringing me to NYC…again. Oh, by the way, Dan Cerone, thank you for your feedback after the course. Not only will you “remember it forever” I will remember you as long as I have a memory.  


Posted August 23, 2016 at 2:12PM

Teaching at Northeastern University a course on cervical influences on the body and cranium was so gratifying for so many reasons. It was our 6th course at this host site and after I experienced the warm hospitality and support it probably will not be the last. These people allowed me to get through the course objectives, which many of you know it is difficult because of my love for tangicial speech, and provide historical relationships between osteopathy and PRI concepts. Jen – you have made my job  easier because of your hospitality and administrative mission to distribute and receive all pertinent articles and items that the Institute needs. I love teaching this course, but each course has its own  personality and the attendees from the Northeast part of the USA, and Israel, the students, the nurse with her CSCS, and the dentist who works with athletes, all now have one thing in common; respect for the temporal rotation and sphenoid greater wing height. Dr. Portnoy thank you for all your contributions and your participation. It helped so much!  Boston’s knowledge and application of PRI principles is growing because of the staff at Northeastern University and people like Donna Behr, and Sean Fitzgerald who had assisted and work so hard as PRCs to endorse this Institute!

Posted July 18, 2016 at 3:43PM
Categories: Courses

Recent course question: Is the Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (ATNR) ever fully integrated, or is it constant presence throughout our lives?

The ATNR typically is inhibited by the age of 3.5 years. However when a lack of alternating head, trunk and appendage movement occurs, because of visual, auditory or tactile sensory orientation that reinforces homo-lateral movement, the retention of this primitive reflex can have an impact on behavioral formation of the body on rotation indefinitely.

Some of the retained symptoms include postural imbalance when the head is turned, difficulty in cross pattern movement of the trunk where one arm needs to move toward the controlled leg, hand-eye coordination difficulty over focus attention of the visual system, visual perception difficulties, cognitive learning challenges, excessive wrist and ankle tone visually on the right side, and bilateral functional integration difficulties in general.

The ATNR, like other reflexes that are considered to be associated with vision can be triggered or stimulated reflexively to some degree anytime in life when bilateral or alternating function is challenged by over referencing homo-lateral anti gravitational or positional strategies.

Posted June 29, 2016 at 6:11PM
First 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Last

Products

CD Bundles
Non-manual Techniques
Manual Techniques DVD
Manual Techniques
Illustrations
PRIVY
PRI Video for You