Posts by Ron Hruska

I had the wonderful fortune to visit with Dan Houglum MSPT, ATC/L, PRC the day before this course was presented via live stream, beginning on Aug 22nd. Dan’s insight on the Institute’s past, present and upcoming future is always appreciated and questioned by me, simply because he places events, courses, course material provided in two or more courses, timelines, and approaches in an aligned state, for comparison, contrast and collocation. He and his career time have grown around this juxtaposition. He has an intuitive sense of how organizations operate by addressing and assessing this operational behavior, and therefore, he enjoys watching, and participating in, the delivery of the Impingement and Instability course; that was initially offered in 2007 without the ability of the attendee to compare it to another pre-existing course.  

The fact that the first course in February of 2007 can be compared to the last course presented in August of 2020, allows one to quickly see the similarities and the advancements. The fact of two courses, with the same title, written by the same author, can be placed close together with contrasting effects is called a juxtaposition. The juxtaposition of these two courses portray an image of position of bones in 2007 and a position of sense of these same bones in 2020. Dan took his first PRI course in 2004 and has had significant juxtaposition moments since. Juxtaposition is a word that describes the contrasting effect of two things that are placed side by side or close together. For example, two course manuals, with different dates and yet with the same information, may have juxtaposition when one of the courses have been updated, advanced or added onto. Another example of juxtaposition, is this course itself, by looking at cortical function of the human’s two sides of the body that are parallel to each other or “next to each other”. Instability on one side of the body may need to occur when the other side of the body, in the same region, is referencing impingement or the contact of two bony or joint surfaces. One side needs to cortically “loosen” up while the other side can “tighten” up.

   

This ‘positional juxtaposition’ helps us appreciate the need to experience instability, to remain on guard and prepared, as well as the need to experience impingement, to remain confident and in control, when we lose sense of composure. Parallelism of our two sides of our body, and their associated neurologic and orthopedic juxtapositions, has always been a strong interest of Dan’s, and having him by my side, when I taught this live stream course, gave me and everyone that was present, a considerable amount of favorable comparative contrast.

Posted August 31, 2020 at 9:35PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

Page 22 and ‘The Room Where It Happens’  

On page 22 of this very updated course, the first bullet reads; “After significant reflection on historical ‘patterned occlusal pathomechanics’ of the teeth and corresponding feet over the years of clinical integrated interdisciplinary practice, I believe the human neck is the greatest neuromechanical mediator and indicator of treatment outcome.”  It was so enjoyable to put this course together and be able to write page 22. The organization and the establishment of content, beginning with a discussion on teeth and feet provisional occlusal interference, fulfilled my intense desire to explain how teeth and feet interfere and intercede on each other. Having twelve dentists present and willing to learn how postural mechanics are regulated by appendicular skeletal musculature interplay with oral facial skeletal musculature, was so gratifying. These dentists will play a major role in the future restoration of non-integrated feet and teeth mal-occlusal patterning. The interaction of these dentists, with other PRI minded, movement professionals, will help define what “true postural” occlusal restoration entails.

On page 22 of this very futuristic course, the second bullet reads; “Restoring normal occlusal patterns of function at specific stages of tooth to tooth contact/interference and foot to ground contact /interference, reduces cervical pathomechanics and related symptomology." This is the intent of this course …

I hope many more professionals, in the future, will want to be on page 22 where  “PATTERNED OCCLUSAL PATHOMECHANICS AND THEIR POSSIBLE UNDERLYING BIOMECHANICAL CONTRIBUTION” influence on interdisciplinary intervention decision processing, begins. I truly feel that there will be more of us in the future that will want to be like Hamilton, in the recent musical, when he said to “Mr. Burr, Sir”; “I want to be in the room where it happens.”  I believe all of our descendants, along with interdisciplinary minded professionals, will “want to be in the room where occlusion happens”.

Posted August 7, 2020 at 7:33PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

Writing up a summary of an overview of a course that covers the most prominent patterns of impingement, instability, interference, and influence related to cortical and functional dominance is difficult to do, especially when my mind wants to elaborate on all the material that relates to only four anatomical regional tabs in the course manual. This course is fun to teach. That is about as short of a summary I can make. This course is an overview of ‘my’ cortical function as it relates to biased concepts (my concepts), on human biased compression and de-compression. Explaining the human’s brain cortical functional dominance integration, built off of the sense of the bottom of paired calcaneuses, taluses, tibias, acetabulums, and fossae of scapulas is a gift, and an enjoyable challenge for me, after looking at this ‘traditional’ way of thinking for over four decades. This is a novel way of approaching the way we use our mass on the floor/ground, posterior shelf of the calcaneus, top of the talus, top of the tibial condyle’s plateau, top of femoral head, and top of the ribs of the thorax for sense of pressure.   

That’s why this summary is so short;  “It is fun to teach!”

Posted June 19, 2020 at 3:49PM
Categories: Courses Science

On April 18th and 19th our Institute hosted its first live stream course on the importance of maintaining and facilitating the tone and tension needed for 30 degrees of cervical symbiotic movement. Two cortical hemispheres, two communities of inter-neuronal highways, two lateralized sets of appendages and two autonomic systems of drive, that are all associated with one “neck” of their being.  Regardless of the side of the relationship that is more dominant, or more sensed, or more patterned around a vertical axis, or more associated with emotion, fear, decision making, or physiology, both sides have to communicate with biased biologic messages going up and down through their one and only neck.

   

A few minutes ago I finished a face time conversation with Maureen Henderson PT, PRC regarding our 20th year anniversary as an Institute. She also told me she would be sending me a book written by Robin Wall Kimmer, entitled ‘Braiding Sweet Grass’.  She said the book reminded her of our relationship and the role the Postural Restoration Institute serves for masting. Mast seeding, also called "masting", is the production of many seeds by a plant every two or more years in regional synchrony with other plants of the same species. Mast seeding is an effective defense because the seed predators become satiated before all the seeds have been consumed.

   

On November 3rd, 2001 Maureen attended her first PRI course, Postural Restoration (the name of this course was changed to Postural Respiration in 2004) on the campus of the University of Minnesota. She reminded me that she was tired and had jet lag but wanted to go to this course because of the inter-connectedness associated with the material in a course she received from a recent course she attended on ‘Protonics’ that was taught by Karen Swanson PT, through the Postural Restoration Institute. “The core of my being is that everything is connected and meeting you and hearing you for the first time satisfied my core”, was a statement that resonated with me, because we truly have similar DNA, similar thoughts about purpose, similar respect for nature and trees… Both Maureen, and my son, RJ, know that we are all truly connected, just as all trees are.

  

Trees and plants talk to each other using an internet of fungus. Hidden under our feet is an information superhighway that allows plants to communicate and help each other out. Mycelial networks of fungus allows individuals (trees) who may be widely separated, to communicate and help each other learn new ways to survive, commit new mistakes, and to boost their host plants’ immune systems.  Fungi have been called ‘Earths’ natural internet (Paul Stamets 2008 TED talk on “Earth’s Natural Internet”). Both the tree trunks and our human necks need biologic tone, social tension and regional connected support that is enhanced through “masting”, so that a few of us who breathe and respect the science of PRI can further nurture the evidence behind the need for 30 degrees of cervical rest. Our “masting” effort, our inter-neuronal highways, and our interconnected hemispheres just got a huge boost from live streaming on April 18th and 19th , through the use of the internet; just like the trees we walk under that are getting a huge boost from the Mycelia fungi that never stop networking.

Full Cervical Revolution Live Stream Photo Album

Kind Regards,
Ron

Posted April 24, 2020 at 8:38PM

If there are three bones that have always had an impact on my course of study as related to respiration, airway, occlusion, oral function, head and neck position, speech, vocal cord dysfunction, tongue compensation, nasal flow, autonomics in general, auditory sense and the soft and hard palates, it is the temporal and occipital bones. Three very important nerves go through the most infamous foramen of mankind, the Internal Jugular Foramen (IJF). When the lumen or congruence of this foremen is challenged our bodies know it. Cranial mal-position and underlying associated predictable human torsional constraint increases the need for compensation and  work around this malpositioned set of paired bones, on an accompanying occiput bone that orients and houses the medulla and brain stem in off-centered state of un-rest. This positional state of unrest feeds neurologic information to our mid brain and associated cortices that are directly associated with my course of study, outlined above.   

Re-orientation of these two paired IJFs can have a major impact on ANS, SoNS and CNS function and behavior, secondary to the compression or lack of compression on these three nerves. The glossopharyngeal nerve innervates the stylopharyngeus muscles, the vagus nerve innervates the levator veli palatini, the salingopharyngeus, the palatoglossus, the palatopharyngeus, and the pharyngeal constrictor muscles, and the accessory nerve innervates the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. I will not go over these three nerves sensory innervation, but these nerves are instrumental in how we physically, physiologically and psychologically behave and operate. Cranial mal-guidance provided by the calvaria, temporal and occiput bones and their associated torsional patterns of function can be resolved through PRI based sacral cranial repositioning and through PRI based thoracic cranial resolution, that incorporates cranial oscillatory alternation. Having the opportunity to outline and teach the reasoning behind these PRI techniques and considerations, offered by this unique course, through the involvement of the sinus cavities, the palatine bones, and the pharynx, is as fulfilling for me as any course I have ever written, designed or taught.

 

I would like to thank Amy Goddard PT, DPT, OCS, CSC, PRC and her staff, once again, for hosting another PRI course at her expansive and accommodating facility. Gail Kaiser PT, OCS, thank you for your willingness to participate in my demonstration autonomic orthotics. And Stephanie Irizarry Pt, CLT-LANA, PRC your presence is always welcomed because of your love for Pantone 269 C (purple), your predictable body performance through autonomic filtering, and your on-going smile. Jennifer Bullock PT, DPT, OCS, PRC your input, discussion and feedback was so invaluable. I honestly believe, this is ‘your course’ if there ever was one offered by PRI. I truly love everything you stand for and represent.  

    

Posted March 4, 2020 at 10:08PM

Dominant cortical behavior and function as related to human bias and behavior has always been a strong interest, and passion of mine. In 2007 I wrote and compiled a course entitled ‘Impingement and Instability’ to begin a journey with those who have interest in the gifts of contact and oscillation. Four tabs were selected based on their importance in corporeal-sense, hemispheric influence, and biased lateralized behavior. Interaction of calcaneus, femur, hip/pelvis, and scapula anatomy through our extrapyramidal system is critical for reflexes, forward locomotor motion, complex dominant driven function and postural control. This has always been an ‘extrapyramidal’ based course. However, after thirteen years of presentation, I feel the Institute is at a great place to incorporate the significance of pressure, pronation, and push as it relates to these sites of interactive referenced modulated motor activity.

 

The extent of our creativity and capriciousness depends on both our soul and the soles we use to develop behavioral patterns associated with confidence built off of integrating contralateral, hemispheric and bio-tensegrity input. I was so excited this last weekend to discuss how we are regulated by self-regulating pressure of the scapula to capitalize on our ability to perform with things that push, propel and please us. The ground developed, directed and designed our anatomical behavior, while the earth’s gravity gave us the security to defend, offend and create without loss of life. This updated course has not really taken on a new course of direction, but definitely will take those, who attend, into dimensions never before looked at or addressed in the manner they are now presented and applied, with evidence that was not considered when addressing the reasoning for symptomology related to feet and hand haptics.

   

The re-assurance from the wonderful feedback I received after this course, re-assured me that the PRI nation is ready for the importance of variable femoral and scapula instability, and associated counterpart contralateral stability, as related to the metric embracement of calcaneal and pelvis impingement that directs and orchestrates the possible disharmony and dysfunction associated with pre-patterned forward locomotor movement. Thank you One on One Physical Therapy for hosting another PRI course. You all were so gracious with your time, support and assistance. Karen Warren PT, MPT, OCS, ATC the coffee was great from both cups, even when you lifted the left hand with the cup in it and your body’s mass moved to the right, (LAIC, RBC coffee). Dan Houglum MSPT, ATC/L, PRC, Jennifer Smart DPT,PRC and Michael DuBois DPT, OCS, TDN, CS USPHS/HIS provided so much insight and instructional feedback, thank you.

Posted February 12, 2020 at 2:44PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians Science

This is absolutely one of most gratifying courses I get to give twice a year. I truly could engage into this type of instructional endeavor every week. So much fun. And so gratifying to read the comments after each course and how much it meant to both the attendee that has taken a number of PRI courses prior to attending and those that are starting out on the PRI journey.

Ron Hruska, PRI Non-Manual Technique Workshop

For a quick review, I am given techniques that were selected by these attendees; and then I summarize who the techniques were designed for at the time I initially clinically used them and applied them to. Obviously this reasoning of application is limited and incomplete, but it gives those in the room opportunity to learn what I was thinking at the time each selected technique was clinically designed. This explanation allows me the opportunity to engage on how each technique is presently viewed by me and incorporated into my integrative mind set and practice, because of the many years of application and outcome assessment. Some of these techniques I have been using over 30 years. Clinical concepts as they relate to things that the clinician should consider, be mindful of, and cautiously move through for optimal outcome and patient acceptance, appreciation and apprehensive containment, are outlined whenever possible. Much of this discussion is generated by real time through class participation and input. This is the most interactive PRI course available, because of the availability of the founder’s mindset and the time spent on each step and the integrative mindful purpose of each individual step.

PRI Non-Manual Techniques Workshop

Additional considerations that I offer, enhances the existential experience and reasoning. This dialogue not only focuses on the technique’s interdimensional outcome, but allows the room of attendees to watch, listen and experience these relationships first hand. This is what I absolutely enjoy the most. To listen to the feedback the attendee gives, describes and relates to after the processed feedforward sense is felt, cortically incorporated and functionally measured, is so humbling and consistently rewarding for both the avatar on stage, i.e. the person who is performing the technique he or she selected, and the engaged viewers. 

PRI Non-Manual Techniques Workshop

Each of the 13 techniques that were dissected in this manner, offered positional, selection, reference, referent, and respiratory considerations for neuro-cognitive repeatable results. Quite honestly, the time preparing for these two days and its unique material, after Jen gave me each separate techniques that were requested by this particular course’s attendees, was as enjoyable as the actual class time. This time spent on outlining key concepts, application, steps, integrative sense, and desired outcomes, acknowledges my historical perspective and strengthens this Institute’s future application of such needed integrated and desired processing. I look forward to any and all of the future Non-Manual days ahead of me, and hope you will consider the possibilities you personally will experience, if you accept this invitation to participate with me. Thank you!

PRI Non-Manual Techniques Workshop

PRI Non-Manual Techniques Workshop

PRI Non-Manual Techniqeus Workshop

Posted February 6, 2020 at 9:54PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

In the later part of 2004 I met with Stan Babel through Karen Jiran MPT, PRC and Carrie Langer MPT, ATC, PRC. Stan who owned and managed Physical Medicine Diagnostics Rehabilitation (PD Midway) and wanted to build a pool. At that time I was really interested in hydrodynamics and had countless discussions with my brother who is an engineer regarding pump power, jet nozzles, etc. And more importantly I wanted to design a pool for patterned neuromuscular isolation and inhibition through the use of directional water to maximize specific aquatic afferentation, as well as compensatory push and pull recognized by the autonomic and central nervous systems. My first PRI Sequential Movement (PRISM) pool design was developed and constructed through Stan. All eight of the stations provide neuromuscular isolation and feed forward activation of groups of muscles to resolve postural related dysfunctional autonomic and physiologic behavior through the flow of water. With the arrival of this pool and its science, PDR Midway, became IMPACT Physical Medicine and Aquatic Center.


Presenting course material that is related to the brain’s lateralized hemispheric specialization and the autonomic nervous influence on our central nervous system’s compensatory behavior, fifteen years later, made my amygdala related emotional, sentimental and nostalgic feelings flow uncontrollably. Stan and his wonderful staff over the years has enabled me to continue to move in directions that I patiently outlined, ballooned and flowed with. I feel so indebted and grateful to him and his staffs over the years. Many of those affiliated with this integrated minded center were in this class.


This particular class also made me feel somewhat sentimental, because I have known most, if not all of them, for so many years. They were watched, observed, tested and judged by me. They were my independent, dependent and constant variables for my research effort on knowing when, how and what to deliver to get where we were on November 2nd, 2019. There were 18 Credentialed providers in the room that affectionately tolerated me being somewhat unfiltered regarding autonomic and central nervous systems and their influence on each other and our patterned behavior.  


This course is such a joy for me to teach and resonate around. Just as aquatic flow can re-balance, re-engage, and re-tense us, so can mandibular latero- molar trusive contact, sphenoid (pterygoid) and temporal (temporalis) oscillation, and palatopharyngeus  (diameter of the pharynx) and tensor veli palatine (diameter of the eustacian tube) ANS control. Before Stan, before the pools, before PRI certification, I remember a quote by Socrates that remains with me today. “I cannot teach anybody, I can only make them think” and I am grateful for those who continue to flow and follow thought processes that make them sequentially think.  

The staff at IMPACT are always such wonderful hosts. The morning breakfast, break food and afternoon warm cookies (thank you Stan) are so appreciated. Christie Amundson PT, DPT, HFS,PRC and Mara Brandsoy OTR/L, PRC have a system in place for courses like this. Their and their fellow team-mate’s effort does not go unnoticed.  I also want to thank Amy Pennaz PT and Catherine Shelton PT for their willingness to work with me in demonstrating how to resolve postural related dysfunctional autonomic behavior.

Posted November 19, 2019 at 10:03PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

On page 16 of the Cranial Resolution manual, there is a bullet I wrote that states ‘If we don’t balance rotational events through hemispheric oscillation, occipital alternation or lateralized rhythm, we remain resolved to compensate for our rewarded over-reaction and autonomic drive to repeat.’ 

Yet there were 14 PRCs, 1 PRT and the rest of the class who have taken a minimum of 7 PRI courses. Needless to say, they were “repeaters”. Their drive to continue to learn how to balance rotation with frontal oscillation is on a continuum. The host couple emulates this drive. Thank you Josh and Katie Olinick for hosting another PRI course in the manner you did. (The coffee was just a tad bit cold. Just kidding. I did not need the sugar. Your sweetness diffused into my body before my first sip.) Your hospitality and reception is truly reflective of “home”. Sangini Rane PT, PRC thank you for bringing a patient for all of us to evaluate and make suggestions reflecting autonomics and the course material. Everything about this course I love. The material has been strengthened over my last 30 years of clinical practice. And the messages are being delivered to a body of people who now can appreciate what my autonomic and somatic nervous systems were integrating 30 years ago, with a platform, called ‘PRI’. Any time I get a hug from Susan Henning PT, PRC I feel better than a cold cup of coffee. 

There is so much to consider when one focuses on the interplay between our autonomic nervous system, our somatic nervous system and our central nervous system. And, there is so much to get excited about when the interplay of these systems can be modified, re-integrated, re-oriented and re-calibrated through oscillation of novel conscious and un-conscious sensory afferentation. Our behavior, i.e. psychology of the conscious, revolves and resolves around fluctuation of brain lateralization, hemispheric specialization, dominance (subjective experience) as it relates to our brain’s individual unique asymmetrical and emotional processing. (page 31 of Cranial Resolution). According to the authors of ‘The Intersubjective Perspective’ (thank you Michael Zhao), focus on inter-related subjective experience unveils forms and patterns that conscious experience repetitively and unconsciously assumes over time (page 101). Therefore, our subjective experience of resolving conscious experience and patterns of behavior and biology through novel integration of these three nervous systems could generate “access to the underlying structures and organizing principles and patterns that unconsciously govern psychological life”. I absolutely love discussing behavior as it relates to evidence based autonomic research. The attendees at this course in NYC gravitated towards behavior as it relates to the limitation of subjective frames of interrelated and integrated nervous systems and their respective developed references. Thank you Borbala Suranyi for being my avatar! Thank all of you in attendance who asked poignant and clinical questions. The award to the one that asked the most insightful and driving questions that pushed us into wonderful engaging response from the entire group, goes to Jeff Eckhouse. Finally, thank you Alicia Ferriere and Finish Line for hosting another PRI course in NYC. I definitely feel at home when I am there.  

Cranial Resolution, New York City, Postural Restoration Institute

Posted August 21, 2019 at 9:11PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Last

Products

CD Bundles
Non-manual Techniques
Manual Techniques DVD
Manual Techniques
Illustrations
PRIVY
PRI Video for You