Posts by Ron Hruska

We all know someone who experience difficulties with simple movements and at the same time can move or carry out, what appears to be more complex movements easily. This phenomenon of ‘Kinesia Paradoxa’ is one that is often seen with individuals who have been diagnosed with a basal ganglia disease called Parkinson’s Disease. However, by studying basal ganglia diseases we can learn so much about the precursors and the stages of this disease and its developmental patterns and symptomology. I believe, I have been on a journey of researching coupling and identifying similarities in people who have oscillator conflict at the caudate nucleus and putamen or dorsal striatum, at the subthalamic nucleus, at the globus pallidus, and at the substantial nigra pars reticulata, and didn’t really know it. For this is where the majority of our paradoxical function really begins, is initiated and looped. For these are the areas that make up the basal ganglia. Ganglia that reflect the parts of the brain that are not often even thought about, when sequencing steps in a “exercise”, or movement technique.

I always enjoy the amount of time, energy, thought and ideas that go into these PRI Symposiums. Ideas, that flow far in advance of the actual delivery of material and madness. I love every moment of these preparatory mental madness moments. Because that is what is exactly going on in our basal ganglia. Frenzied, chaotic, pandemonium mayhem, that can lead to periods of deranged decisions or a flow of indiscreet ideas. It’s the latter that we would never experience if we were controlled by frequencies of neuro-synapses that didn’t loop with other unfamiliar neuroreceptors, once in a while; like every 10 milliseconds.

Ron Hruska, Basal Ganglia Disease, Annual Symposium, Parkinson's Disease

Click HERE to view the full photo album.

There is a fine line between sanity and conflict. I personally need both in my life, and I am fairly certain you do too. Jennifer Smart DPT, PRC, Neal Hallinan CSCS, LMT, PRT and myself put a manual together, delivered content, and digressed into areas that reflect ideology of some of our most important ganglia we have. We enjoyed the time together in this presentation of ideas, in the preparation of ideas, and in the exchange of ideas that will hopefully strengthen the balance of movement associated with asymmetrical sanity and movement associated with symmetrical conflict. We, the speakers, learned so much from each other and the science that actually does support our zaniness and Zen-like ideas, all because of our respect for life’s paradoxes.

Here are a few of the comments we received from the class participants/attendees:

“Yes the material outlined "bigger picture" neurological influences on all humans that manifest as pathology in some. All people will benefit from this mindset of looking at human neurological function.”

“Love that these symposiums build on prior knowledge and become useful not as cookbook ways of treating patients but as ways to understand human behavior and provide frameworks to improve outcomes for all humans.”

“It brought the new perspective in how I look at Parkinsons and how big Inhibition is!”

“Just one fun thing. I was talking to my almost 91 year old mother who now uses a Rollator and she was asking about a stand up walker the night the course ended. Her next statement was funny (no knowledge of the course) and she said that the main thing she missed in her walking was "swinging her arms". I went down and worked with her with swinging hiking sticks in her hands (except I was using 2 reachers) and progressed her to using a trowel and hand clippers and she walked about 60 feet 4 times (back and forth in her driveway) unassisted and non stop. Cannot express how much fun it was to give her some freedom (she still loves to garden). Thank you all for a fantastic event as always. It is great to be able to go back an implement changes in my patients.”

“It felt balanced between the three presenters. I felt that Jennifer utilized her time the best, she did a good job of communicating her work, her experience, research, and I am grateful for her efforts. All presenters did an excellent job. Ron helped me to appreciate the basal ganglia, I really had never thought about this part of the brain in my day to day life and now it is imprinted. Neal was very engaging and enthusiastic, His passion moved me to appreciate dance and rhythm in a whole new way.”

“This Symposium was over flowing with important information about a new way of thinking for working with all our patients or clients, not just those with Parkinson's disease.”

“This was a great course to expand my knowledge of Basal Ganglia disease and treatment options. I have been certified in the LSVT BIG program for years but would also like to branch out and have other options for my patients. This course gave me lots of ideas”

The last comment above summarizes our basal ganglia’s ability to keep us resonating with bombardment of relaying information that allow us to flow with “lots of ideas” that are recognized and required for satisfactory frontal cortex creativity. And if we don’t occasionally fulfill our dopaminergic ideas, that we create, generate and plan, we may just be laying down the framework for future unplanned kinesia paradoxa, that we want to avoid.

Posted May 5, 2021 at 3:34PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians Science

There are four kinds of documentation that most of us use to change our behavior:  
1)  Learning oriented tutorials.
 2) Goal oriented how-to guides.
3) Understanding-orientated discussions.
4) And, information-oriented reference material.


Each of these four types of documentations usually have instances within the document that refers to related information elsewhere in the same document. This is important as it forms a network structure of relations that exist between different parts of data, dictionary-internal as well as dictionary-external. If the cross-reference mechanism is well designed, visibly or technically, the reader, and in this case, the course attendee, will be able to follow each and apply ‘cross-reference’ event, to the referenced content whether the content is presented visibly or technically.  


The last example, of the four listed above, enhances usability and application of content in each of the PRI Non-Manual Techniques. Documentation or description that identifies direct reference and referent sites of consistent interest; is required so documentation that indirectly implicates cross references from these and other discrete or unconsidered sites can provide content-strategies to meet the desired needs and expectations, from both the provider and the participant.


As the author of these techniques, and as the author of cross-referencing design associated with each technique, effort to ensure that location and content of the target of the cross-reference in each technique needs to be consistent, regardless of the aptness of the provider or the participant.  


These opportunities to provide my reasoning behind each of the techniques, that were selected by this course’s participants, are not exceeded in any other course offered in PRI. Therefore, the guidance I offer to answer questions on the ‘why’s, ‘when’s, ‘who’s and ‘what’s regarding each technique’s reference’s, referent’s, and cross-reference’s content, is an absolute unique opportunity for both the author and the attendee seeking behavior modification through documentation that is resourcefully dissected at a level that is unsurpassed in this Institute.  Each technique (documentation) dissection experience is truly one of the most rewarding things I have done in my life.  And I am grateful.

 
I want to thank Dan Houglum, Torin Berge, Dave Drummer, Jen, Hannah and RJ for their assistance in making this course so enjoyable to teach and apply to “real” life limitations and likenesses.

Posted February 4, 2021 at 4:18PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

Every December I reflect on my past year personal and professional activities, a few days before beginning the Advanced Integration course.  My inner wellness usually transforms during these four days because of the way I feel connected in real time with real bodies, who have real interest in how our bodies transform by revolving and evolving around axial sagittal verticality and appendicular horizontal integration.  I need this eye-level connection with other people to complete my year and to advance myself, as well as the science I am so obsessed with.  This past year, as challenging as it was, advanced all of us because we needed to connect with technology in ways that we never have before; to revolve, evolve, and transform with other people.   

Technology is value neutral. It becomes value non-neutral, depending how one uses it.  The amount of time I spent this last year in some virtual space, or in the space above my neck, by observing bodies above the neck, is overwhelming.  However, because of my need to connect with real people, real bodies with real interactive interest, I had to do so with eyes primarily, that were all at eye-level with mine. Body language became eye language.

This opportunity to interconnect, virtually, reduced my isolation and actually advanced me in so many ways.  I have never been more prolific or productive, in my life, like I have been this year. New courses composed, books  read, research reviewed, interdisciplinary collaboration, etc. all reduced potential obsolescence because of technology.  Who would have thought a little virtual reality would advance us, like it has.  

Therefore, it just seemed natural, that after a year of virtual wellness, we would host an Advanced Integration course with 11 people (PRC applicants) actually sitting to the left and in front of me and 100 people sitting in a 'Hollywood Squares’ box, slightly to the right and also, in front of me.  It advanced all of us who were in attendance.  We received the best of two worlds of advanced postural restoration presence.  This advanced technology seemed so value non-neutral challenging, so futuristic, so non-elementary, so alive and yet so unimaginable, because we were all not in the same room and breathing in the same space.  Everything we did the year before, now feels so retro.

This December my inner wellness rose to a new, novel and an unnatural high. And I am sure all of the future December PRI Advanced Integration course attendees will reflect on the how “real”, integration feels during these four days, in real time, with real bodies on one side of the room and real faces on the other, all because of value non-neutral technology.

I want to thank Dan Houglum, MSPT, ATC/L, PRC, Lori Thomsen, MPT, PRC, Jean Masse, DPT, OCS, ATC, PRC, Lisa Mangino, DPT, PCS, C/NDT, PRC and Jen Platt for making this course so connected and so advanced, in a time where there is so much uncertainty.  

Posted December 30, 2020 at 4:57PM

We all have patients that have a tendency to relapse into a previous condition or mode of behavior that was more than likely built around lateralized pattern strength and movement, that affected both horizontal and vertical cycles of compression and decompression at the pelvis, abdomen, thorax, paranasal sinuses and third and fourth ventricles of the cranium. Focusing on reformatting new methods on how to integrate adductors with abductors, internal rotators with external rotators, or flexors with extensors is a challenge in itself, but when someone’s cycles of rhythm are not in synchrony with that effort, the end result of recidivism is more than likely not the result of erroneous effort or program design. It more likely is a representation, to some degree, of the autonomic nervous system’s role in neuromodulation of the patient’s familiar central nervous system’s past effort. Body motor function, in general, has strong somatic nervous system bias, built by positive reinforcement from past voluntary motor patterning. Successful resolvement (self-regulation, self-healing or self-regulation) of this ANS, CNS and SoNS imbalance requires our vagal nuclei and basal ganglia to respond to cyclical oscillatory rhythm, without a response of threat (ergotropic response) from the ANS.

On-going repatterning occurs with every nuance in life. Our asymmetrical design allows us to remain rhythmical because all three of our nervous systems are dealing with input that is received from two sides of the body, that are purposefully designed for different functional cycling; not bicycling but biologic-cycling. Having the opportunity to relate our clinical relapse dilemmas to research that support effort to program activities that harness patterned laterality and cycling threat through cranial freedom from body dependency on the neck, is something I always look forward to.

The 33 virtual attendee’s interaction, through comments and questions forwarded to Jen Platt and directly to me, during this two day course, enhanced the discussion on how the tone of our body is tuned by ANS tension, and how clinical regulation of cyclical flow of air and frequency of sound, can enhance midrange physiologic outcomes for acceptance of novel physical construct. Cathleen deSmet PT, PRC thank you for your inquisitive and thoughtful questioning and verbal reasoning and verbal repeat of the desirable answer we were trying to achieve. It absolutely benefitted every participant. Alice Lam DDS, you have no idea how much I appreciate your attendance and input. It simply helps everyone when you ask a question from a dental perspective. Greer Mackie PT, DPT, your enthusiasm and smile warmed me and reinforced my passion. Jill Maida PT, DPT, MDT, PRC, your title as “oscillatory” queen will remain with you through my eyes for a long time, simply because your presence invokes oscillation. Rachel Smith DPT,PRC your Sunday dialogue on the ‘centric’ elements of patterned autonomic features  was so appreciated and kept us all engaged. And finally, Jessica Tidswell PT, ATC,PRT, what can I say about someone who I believe has integrated, is integrating, and will continue to integrate the “laterality” of all three neurologic systems, simply because you were born to do so. I really enjoyed seeing and interacting with this entire class of dedicated autonomic, asymmetric, autonomous minded people and look forward to teaching it again in May of next year.  

Posted October 30, 2020 at 8:18PM
Categories: Courses Science

The greatest directional influence on our body’s tensegrity and tempo is forward movement. All of our integration of planar function and neurosensory function is correlated with our environment moving backward; as we cough, speak, walk, reach, chew, listen, sit, watch, etc. The slightest forward movement of the head, arm or leg, is cortically recognized and managed through vestibular related memory and reflex, and cerebellar coordination of the somatic motor sphere. Our ground and space around us are “ours” when we move forward. No one else possesses this personalized biopsychosocial and psychophysiological event. The benefits associated with forward movement, far out weigh those of moving in any other direction. And that would include the wonderful gift of “falling” backward, only to “catch” ourselves, by reaching forward, with a head, arm or leg.


The greatest benefit of having lateralized cortices for integrated visuo-spatial, hemispheric chest, upper limb and lower limb alternation is bipedal, upright forward locomotor movement. Between five million and seven million years ago, some apelike creatures in Africa began to walk habitually on two legs, through savannas, using visuo-spatial propulsion, inter and intra arm pull, and hemi-chest compression.  They never could have walked from Africa into Asia and Europe, two million years ago, if they did not first make and flake crude stone tools with their upper limbs, a half million years prior to that time.   Their arm function was necessary for their respiratory chest endurance to travel and for their peripheral view as a safe voyager.


The modern form of a human, as we know of today, depended on this earlier pre-existent, hemi-cortical dominance, approximately 200,000 years ago, for refinement of existential forward movement that revolved around the establishment of culture and community.  How we shape, grow, pattern and build our behavior and our body, depends on how we move objects that are in front of us and to the side of us, toward us and to the back of us, with inter and intra-limb pull, chest compression, and visuo-spatial propulsion; all allowing us to move forward, like our 200,000 year old ancestors.

(Sarah Petrich, @drsarahpetrich, Instagram)

Our industrial commercialism, capitalism, and careerism, in the present time, has contributed to our heads moving forward, objects in front of us moving forward with us, and objects or environments on the side of us, all moving forward together at some, or all of the time during “walking”. We are on an ecological and evolutionary timeline where the human, in his and her civilization, are doing everything they can to move themselves forward efficiently, in an existential sense. Unfortunately, because of the un-natural commodities around them, they are also moving the entire environment and world around them, with them. Our cortices developed in size because of the need for cortical interplay, as we became dependent on each other, through our sense of movement, space, communication and balance from our eyes and ears, chest walls and cavities and upper and lower limbs. Concrete pavements, straight walls and fast-moving transport systems did not develop today’s unhealthy and unnatural imbalanced forward locomotion. It did however, help bring out the biological rivalry we so often see in our patients, between their two eyes, ears, arms, chests, and legs; and furthermore, contributed to the more recent world of over lateralization for survival of the fittest, fastest and flattest (spine) humans.

(Sarah Petrich, @drsarahpetrich, Instagram)

Homo Sapiens, and the way they move themselves forward, are still evolving and the four components of corollary cortical function are outlined in this course, simply because these four components and the degree to which they are used with and by each other, will reflect on the future’s researcher and anthropologist studies of Holocene human climate of forward movement patterns. Our social climate, our environmental climate and our health climate reflects the demands and challenges we place on our own bodies and thus the environment that encompasses these human patterns of addicted adduction of four of the most precious resources are bodies possess.


I personally, want to thank Jen Platt who consistently and constantly puts up with me and my insane requests to put material together that has never been put together, to my knowledge, in the manner that we have, with outlined research that supports the forward movement, that we should respect. I have been looking forward to teaching a course like this for many years. Therefore, it is hard to summarize my feelings about this topic and the opportunity that this year and the staff around me, presented me. Such a gift. Personal gratification is extended to all you who are observant, and watchful of this journey, of broadening the environment and evolution that is responsible for the patterned world we live with and in, today.

(Nancy Hammond, @integrate360, Instagram)

Posted October 13, 2020 at 4:06PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

I had the wonderful fortune to visit with Dan Houglum MSPT, ATC/L, PRC the day before this course was presented via live stream, beginning on Aug 22nd. Dan’s insight on the Institute’s past, present and upcoming future is always appreciated and questioned by me, simply because he places events, courses, course material provided in two or more courses, timelines, and approaches in an aligned state, for comparison, contrast and collocation. He and his career time have grown around this juxtaposition. He has an intuitive sense of how organizations operate by addressing and assessing this operational behavior, and therefore, he enjoys watching, and participating in, the delivery of the Impingement and Instability course; that was initially offered in 2007 without the ability of the attendee to compare it to another pre-existing course.  

The fact that the first course in February of 2007 can be compared to the last course presented in August of 2020, allows one to quickly see the similarities and the advancements. The fact of two courses, with the same title, written by the same author, can be placed close together with contrasting effects is called a juxtaposition. The juxtaposition of these two courses portray an image of position of bones in 2007 and a position of sense of these same bones in 2020. Dan took his first PRI course in 2004 and has had significant juxtaposition moments since. Juxtaposition is a word that describes the contrasting effect of two things that are placed side by side or close together. For example, two course manuals, with different dates and yet with the same information, may have juxtaposition when one of the courses have been updated, advanced or added onto. Another example of juxtaposition, is this course itself, by looking at cortical function of the human’s two sides of the body that are parallel to each other or “next to each other”. Instability on one side of the body may need to occur when the other side of the body, in the same region, is referencing impingement or the contact of two bony or joint surfaces. One side needs to cortically “loosen” up while the other side can “tighten” up.

   

This ‘positional juxtaposition’ helps us appreciate the need to experience instability, to remain on guard and prepared, as well as the need to experience impingement, to remain confident and in control, when we lose sense of composure. Parallelism of our two sides of our body, and their associated neurologic and orthopedic juxtapositions, has always been a strong interest of Dan’s, and having him by my side, when I taught this live stream course, gave me and everyone that was present, a considerable amount of favorable comparative contrast.

Posted August 31, 2020 at 9:35PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

Page 22 and ‘The Room Where It Happens’  

On page 22 of this very updated course, the first bullet reads; “After significant reflection on historical ‘patterned occlusal pathomechanics’ of the teeth and corresponding feet over the years of clinical integrated interdisciplinary practice, I believe the human neck is the greatest neuromechanical mediator and indicator of treatment outcome.”  It was so enjoyable to put this course together and be able to write page 22. The organization and the establishment of content, beginning with a discussion on teeth and feet provisional occlusal interference, fulfilled my intense desire to explain how teeth and feet interfere and intercede on each other. Having twelve dentists present and willing to learn how postural mechanics are regulated by appendicular skeletal musculature interplay with oral facial skeletal musculature, was so gratifying. These dentists will play a major role in the future restoration of non-integrated feet and teeth mal-occlusal patterning. The interaction of these dentists, with other PRI minded, movement professionals, will help define what “true postural” occlusal restoration entails.

On page 22 of this very futuristic course, the second bullet reads; “Restoring normal occlusal patterns of function at specific stages of tooth to tooth contact/interference and foot to ground contact /interference, reduces cervical pathomechanics and related symptomology." This is the intent of this course …

I hope many more professionals, in the future, will want to be on page 22 where  “PATTERNED OCCLUSAL PATHOMECHANICS AND THEIR POSSIBLE UNDERLYING BIOMECHANICAL CONTRIBUTION” influence on interdisciplinary intervention decision processing, begins. I truly feel that there will be more of us in the future that will want to be like Hamilton, in the recent musical, when he said to “Mr. Burr, Sir”; “I want to be in the room where it happens.”  I believe all of our descendants, along with interdisciplinary minded professionals, will “want to be in the room where occlusion happens”.

Posted August 7, 2020 at 7:33PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

Writing up a summary of an overview of a course that covers the most prominent patterns of impingement, instability, interference, and influence related to cortical and functional dominance is difficult to do, especially when my mind wants to elaborate on all the material that relates to only four anatomical regional tabs in the course manual. This course is fun to teach. That is about as short of a summary I can make. This course is an overview of ‘my’ cortical function as it relates to biased concepts (my concepts), on human biased compression and de-compression. Explaining the human’s brain cortical functional dominance integration, built off of the sense of the bottom of paired calcaneuses, taluses, tibias, acetabulums, and fossae of scapulas is a gift, and an enjoyable challenge for me, after looking at this ‘traditional’ way of thinking for over four decades. This is a novel way of approaching the way we use our mass on the floor/ground, posterior shelf of the calcaneus, top of the talus, top of the tibial condyle’s plateau, top of femoral head, and top of the ribs of the thorax for sense of pressure.   

That’s why this summary is so short;  “It is fun to teach!”

Posted June 19, 2020 at 3:49PM
Categories: Courses Science

On April 18th and 19th our Institute hosted its first live stream course on the importance of maintaining and facilitating the tone and tension needed for 30 degrees of cervical symbiotic movement. Two cortical hemispheres, two communities of inter-neuronal highways, two lateralized sets of appendages and two autonomic systems of drive, that are all associated with one “neck” of their being.  Regardless of the side of the relationship that is more dominant, or more sensed, or more patterned around a vertical axis, or more associated with emotion, fear, decision making, or physiology, both sides have to communicate with biased biologic messages going up and down through their one and only neck.

   

A few minutes ago I finished a face time conversation with Maureen Henderson PT, PRC regarding our 20th year anniversary as an Institute. She also told me she would be sending me a book written by Robin Wall Kimmer, entitled ‘Braiding Sweet Grass’.  She said the book reminded her of our relationship and the role the Postural Restoration Institute serves for masting. Mast seeding, also called "masting", is the production of many seeds by a plant every two or more years in regional synchrony with other plants of the same species. Mast seeding is an effective defense because the seed predators become satiated before all the seeds have been consumed.

   

On November 3rd, 2001 Maureen attended her first PRI course, Postural Restoration (the name of this course was changed to Postural Respiration in 2004) on the campus of the University of Minnesota. She reminded me that she was tired and had jet lag but wanted to go to this course because of the inter-connectedness associated with the material in a course she received from a recent course she attended on ‘Protonics’ that was taught by Karen Swanson PT, through the Postural Restoration Institute. “The core of my being is that everything is connected and meeting you and hearing you for the first time satisfied my core”, was a statement that resonated with me, because we truly have similar DNA, similar thoughts about purpose, similar respect for nature and trees… Both Maureen, and my son, RJ, know that we are all truly connected, just as all trees are.

  

Trees and plants talk to each other using an internet of fungus. Hidden under our feet is an information superhighway that allows plants to communicate and help each other out. Mycelial networks of fungus allows individuals (trees) who may be widely separated, to communicate and help each other learn new ways to survive, commit new mistakes, and to boost their host plants’ immune systems.  Fungi have been called ‘Earths’ natural internet (Paul Stamets 2008 TED talk on “Earth’s Natural Internet”). Both the tree trunks and our human necks need biologic tone, social tension and regional connected support that is enhanced through “masting”, so that a few of us who breathe and respect the science of PRI can further nurture the evidence behind the need for 30 degrees of cervical rest. Our “masting” effort, our inter-neuronal highways, and our interconnected hemispheres just got a huge boost from live streaming on April 18th and 19th , through the use of the internet; just like the trees we walk under that are getting a huge boost from the Mycelia fungi that never stop networking.

Full Cervical Revolution Live Stream Photo Album

Kind Regards,
Ron

Posted April 24, 2020 at 8:38PM

If there are three bones that have always had an impact on my course of study as related to respiration, airway, occlusion, oral function, head and neck position, speech, vocal cord dysfunction, tongue compensation, nasal flow, autonomics in general, auditory sense and the soft and hard palates, it is the temporal and occipital bones. Three very important nerves go through the most infamous foramen of mankind, the Internal Jugular Foramen (IJF). When the lumen or congruence of this foremen is challenged our bodies know it. Cranial mal-position and underlying associated predictable human torsional constraint increases the need for compensation and  work around this malpositioned set of paired bones, on an accompanying occiput bone that orients and houses the medulla and brain stem in off-centered state of un-rest. This positional state of unrest feeds neurologic information to our mid brain and associated cortices that are directly associated with my course of study, outlined above.   

Re-orientation of these two paired IJFs can have a major impact on ANS, SoNS and CNS function and behavior, secondary to the compression or lack of compression on these three nerves. The glossopharyngeal nerve innervates the stylopharyngeus muscles, the vagus nerve innervates the levator veli palatini, the salingopharyngeus, the palatoglossus, the palatopharyngeus, and the pharyngeal constrictor muscles, and the accessory nerve innervates the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. I will not go over these three nerves sensory innervation, but these nerves are instrumental in how we physically, physiologically and psychologically behave and operate. Cranial mal-guidance provided by the calvaria, temporal and occiput bones and their associated torsional patterns of function can be resolved through PRI based sacral cranial repositioning and through PRI based thoracic cranial resolution, that incorporates cranial oscillatory alternation. Having the opportunity to outline and teach the reasoning behind these PRI techniques and considerations, offered by this unique course, through the involvement of the sinus cavities, the palatine bones, and the pharynx, is as fulfilling for me as any course I have ever written, designed or taught.

 

I would like to thank Amy Goddard PT, DPT, OCS, CSC, PRC and her staff, once again, for hosting another PRI course at her expansive and accommodating facility. Gail Kaiser PT, OCS, thank you for your willingness to participate in my demonstration autonomic orthotics. And Stephanie Irizarry Pt, CLT-LANA, PRC your presence is always welcomed because of your love for Pantone 269 C (purple), your predictable body performance through autonomic filtering, and your on-going smile. Jennifer Bullock PT, DPT, OCS, PRC your input, discussion and feedback was so invaluable. I honestly believe, this is ‘your course’ if there ever was one offered by PRI. I truly love everything you stand for and represent.  

    

Posted March 4, 2020 at 10:08PM
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