Posts by Ron Hruska

The skepticism I had 42 years ago, as I graduated from a Physical Therapy program, regarding models of education and health care practice remains with me today. I pursued a Masters in Public Administration to learn how cities, administrations, etc. collaborate and communicate for the benefit of the inhabitant. I learned a lot about business, how the top of the pyramid develops and what paradigms, courageously were successfully encountered and embraced.


When I read the forward of Dr. James Calson’s book ‘ Physiologic Occlusion’ I remember thinking about his comments about “societies” and how much I agreed with his philosophies. He wrote, “Dental societies, associations, foundations, and academies sponsor journals and other publications for the dissemination of scientific articles to the dental community. It is interesting to me that all are accompanied by length bibliographies.  I wonder who wrote the first dental paper and what the bibliography included.  Sometimes it seems that authors are compelled to have large bibliographies to satisfy the critics and skeptics of new and compelling information. Could it be that they are afraid to ‘stand alone’ ? Afraid that they won’t be accepted on the merits of their own work? Afraid to say anything that is not based upon the work of others who are already accepted and respected in the dental community? I may be wrong in that assumption, but I don’t thing so. Copernicus, Einstein, Columbus, Leonardo da Vinci, and many others challenged the current thinking of their age, and today we live with the benefits of their Paradigm Shift.”


Having the opportunity to share and discuss my thinking regarding the Stomatognathic System with someone whom I have always considered a silent mentor, for so many reasons, is truly an honor. This opportunity, probably will not come again in our lifetimes, and for that reason alone, I am so grateful. Dr. Carlson is a giant when it comes to education and paradigm shifts.

 
“Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is – His good, pleasing, and perfect will.” (Romans 12:2)

- Ron Hruska

Someone once said, “you don’t know what you don’t know.” So, it is with those of us who are “students” including me. For almost 30 years I have been traveling from home, both here and abroad, to many countries around the earth to share what I have learned to be true. In so doing, I have met several hundreds of people most of whom have been kind and hospitable including everyone at PRI with Ron, Jason, Jennifer, and RJ being tops on my list.

I was also most impressed by the level of the content of all the information that Ron and Jason presented.
My “world of dentistry” would be wise to listen to the knowledge and information that is being presented in all of your programs.
That might just make a difference between “knowing and guessing.”

- Dr. James Carlson

CLICK HERE to view the full photo album.

Posted May 25, 2022 at 9:07PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians Science

Science is all about expanding the realm of human perception and human sense. Life is both. This tertiary course allows me to discuss how a change in perception and sense of the visuo-spatial cortex, hemi-chest compression, upper extremity reciprocation and lower extremity alternation of mass management can influence dominance or patterned design outcomes.  A change in perception related to any one of these components, changes perception associated with the other three. This predominant component patterning, precedes our cortical and associated physical, physiologic and psychologic dominance in moving ourselves forward.   I asked two individuals who attended this course to provide some honest, visceral feedback about the material that relates to the assessment and treatment of functional cortical dominance. Thank you Andrew Hauser ATC, CSCS, RSCC, PRT and Robert George DC, PRC for the following insights.

"I feel like I could write quite a bit about this subject as everything I felt like I learned in Vision& conversations from both you (Ron) & Heidi all came flooding back, and then some. It integrated all of it, and I appreciated how good of a job you did regarding bringing up what was backed by research. Simple, complex and everything in between. It's tertiary for a reason, there is no doubt, but it felt like I could finally share what I had learned from you that others hadn't yet experienced. It put it into words. I'm sure each course will be different, yet the golden thread will remain.

Where to begin?! The FLM course brought concepts from the previous vision courses, advanced integration and the primary courses and truly integrated them into what is driving the show on a daily basis. Being able to take all the phases of gait and break them down through our visual processes, hemi-chest airflow, upward limb alternation and how the lower half is responding & supporting these components of forward locomotor movement was a revelation. Understanding the biased-cortical / hemispheric "need for speed" and our abilities, as practitioners, to slow everything down may have turned this into a course on psychology, that wasn't a course on psychology. I think they just took the lid off of Pandora's box." - Andrew Hauser

"Last weekend Ron presented FLM and for this faculty member it was an experience that opened the door wider to PRI tertiary principles.  Integrating Hruska hemispheric components of vision, hemi-chest wall airflow and upper limb alternation first, then considering lower limb alternation, really cemented the basics of forward locomotor movement.  The course also opened the door to more questions for me especially when Ron was talking about the “trombone” effect of near and far vision for FLM.

I called Ron after this course today with not only questions but a realization that this last weekend so many light bulbs went on in my head that opened a gateway to somatosensory topics.  I must confess when I took the vision course several years ago, I didn’t understand much after words!  I was just learning to teach the basic mechanics of primary course work and was overwhelmed by what seemed to be a really complex subject.  After this past weekend, not only did the vision course make more sense, but tertiary course concepts from Cranial Resolution and Occlusal Cervical Restoration became more clear as the sensory and motor components of coordinated and balanced movement were revealed.

One of my questions for Ron was regarding Functional Cortical Dominance.  In our talk today, Ron was discriminating between cortical dominance as well as individual pre-dominance developed over time.  In Postural Respiration, we present the very basics of the left half of brain contributing to right sided dominance.  But the discussion is much more complex including what we see, hear, feel, sense from the ground, temperature, where sound is coming from and the visual kinesthetic sense of movement and flow of things going past us.  This is a short list of sensory input in addition to a psychological component of how we respond to the mystery of being alive for a sense of well being!

In a recent walk I had in nature with Ron and Robin, the topic of discussion was the very human hunger and need of having a sensual experience in nature for our mental and emotional wellbeing.  Filling our senses the sight of waterfalls, rivers flowing into pristine lakes, seeing  the varieties of color, wildlife and trees  all fill a need for a sensual experience.  Ancient natural sound that we have heard as humans for thousands of years like the sound of wind in tall trees, flowing water falls, a thunderstorm and the sound of wildlife including birds and a coyote call are all in our DNA.  The mille-second processing of natural sounds orient us in time and space and even feeling the wind on one side of our face gives us a sense of direction and orientation as well.  Becoming conscious of and feeding all of our senses we all hunger for but have become unconscious or disconnected from in a converged modern world.  These somatosensory experiences expand our awareness, feed our mind and emotions beauty and inspiration and allow for the joy and freedom of movement that is rare in a paved over, domesticated and confined modern experience we just assume is “life”.

 Sensory processing though our five senses is a complex, multilayered experience affecting all parts of our brain all at once with horizontal and vertical movement, flow and forward motion and a mental and emotional response that is processed unconsciously and consciously instantaneously.

Ron asked be for a brief recap of my brief discussion today and as I see it as movement specialists in PRI, expanding and becoming more conscious of our own sensual acuity with the purpose of understanding not just human movement, but providing a path to more sensory awareness, internal mental and emotional fulfillment and well being for our patients and ourselves is a worthy endeavor." - Skip George

Posted May 24, 2022 at 9:51PM
Categories: Courses Science

Where Would We Be Without Interference? Our Recovery Depends On It.

After talking about the molars influence on “grounded” movement and the canines influence on “guided” exploration, I become more mindful about the direction, both the Institute and these teeth have always had on the influence of “posture”. Our recovery of food going down the wrong “pipe”, our recovery of losing our balance when slipping on a rug, our recovery of mis-pronouncing when using familiar vernacular, our recovery of our visual focus when we misjudge objects in the distance, our recovery of our anti-gravitational unilateral abdominals, hamstrings, and triceps, our recovery of our breath......etc. all require a sense of ourselves, our interoception, our ‘centric’ presence, that is given to us through occlusal and podal interference.   

I have evolved my life around these human grounded and un-grounded concepts of reference and restraint guidance. And I am only hopeful, as illusory as the concepts, research and corollaries that were provided in this very highly integrated course on teeth and feet are and can be, that health care providers will appreciate how to “recover” better through the integration of the ‘floors’ the maxillae, and the ‘floors’ the feet depend on for postural balance. I am enlivened for those dentists and movement specialists who decide to immerse themselves into the world of recovery, by addressing how to put the neck to rest, through pterygoid, palatine, and plane alternation. The resonance of recovery is the most grounded state one can accomplish. Simply because the action, the guidance, and sense of limitation, which is what the sense of interference provides, protects and relaxes our necks and essentially, us.

If after reading this, you become more curious about our need for balance built off of interferences, please consider taking this course, offered on October 14th and the 15th, or consider attending this year’s Spring Symposium on “The Stomatognathic System: An Interdisciplinary Approach In The Management of Spatial Navigation and Structural Strength” on April 22nd and the 23rd.

Melissa Truska, thank you for balancing me out those two days. With you on my left and Jen Platt on my right, I felt so grounded and supported, as a presenter in front of a screen of so many I truly wanted to personally interact with, individually. There were countless questions, that were answered by Jen Platt. I appreciate her so much. Her talent and historical presence in this Institute allows me to do what I appreciate doing. And that is presenting material that has foundation, regardless of how familiar one is with that foundation of science. PRI applications and techniques, are built off of and around my beliefs, practice and principles. And Jen and her staff keep me, the faculty and all of us grounded, secured and consistent, in a world full of confusion and mis-interference.

Posted April 1, 2022 at 2:12PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

One Thing in Life You Do Not Want To Lose

There are so many things in life that need to be dropped off, like primitive reflexes, baby teeth, and excessive weight. But the one thing you don’t want to lose is your natural, neutral position of your upright neck.  Our upright cervical lordosis of 30 degrees, plus or minus a few degrees, reduces our masticatory stress, subglottal stenosis, head and cervical lateral displacement, as well as our development of open bites, mouth breathing, elevated hyoid malposition, and lowered glossal function. Therefore, you, me and humans in general, do not want to lose the capability of positioning and placing ourselves around a centrally located, cervical spine that has the ability to laterally flex each direction, from an appropriate, normal cervical aligned state, associated with 30 degrees of lordotic curvature. Our livelihood depends on this ability to keep, use and alternate our behavior from this homeostatic state.

Therefore, this is one thing in life I do not want to lose.

This course gives you, the speaker and your patients the opportunity to develop skills and sense on how to keep it.  And with the help of Skip George DC,PRC and Louise Kelley DPT, PRC we reinforced the way to assess, intervene and keep normal, neutral, natural cervical lordosis. Its like the clean air we breathe, the clear water we drink, the natural, non-preservative based food we eat, the honest, good people we interact with and the naturopathic sleep we desire. It is health. It is the best 30 degrees of preventative medicine there is. Skip and Louise, live their life around these concepts and are living examples of what it takes to keep it. Their presentation on how to revolve around a neck and function with a neck that has been re-positioned, will enlighten you. I am sure, one thing they will not lose in their life, is their neutral, natural cervical lordosis. They have been incorporating neuro-mechanics that evolved around 30 degrees of cervical lordosis, their entire life.

Posted February 1, 2022 at 10:46PM
Categories: Courses Science

I honestly look forward to the Advanced Integration course every year. It offers a moment in time, at the end of the year to reflect and to resolve issues that arose in the time period between the last Advanced Integration course and the present one. It is a moment in my personal life where I can decide if I should move into areas of discussion built off of  platforms that were laid down in the recent past, or not. It is a brief period of time where I can review where we, as an Institute, are with respect to concepts that are better accepted and appreciated. This acceptance and appreciation will result in longer periods of time where application becomes a mainstream of future assessment and intervention, and more importantly, an expectation.  

Summarizing the same main concepts in 2004, at the first Advanced Integration course, offered me a moment to integrate neurological, biased, patterns of breathing with tri-planar movement and muscle through discussions on thoracic flexion and curvature of the spine, with 20 to 30 people. Who would have ever thought that there would be 80 plus people, from 8 different countries, attending a four day course with the same title, the same platforms, but advance application because of 17 other moments in time where this course, with the same title, in the same number of days, advanced the original moments in time, so exponentially.

Focusing on dextral orientation, thought processes the human uses for integrated  unilateral and contralateral anatomy and associated sense, two central diaphragm axis’s that regulate our spinal axis, and the importance of ‘left hand to right knee’ function, in today’s world of unlimited Artificial Intelligence (AI)  and limited Advanced Integration (AI), is a reflection of many, many moments in this Institute’s history, where planned periods of time, in this case 96 hours or 4 days, had a major impact on future AI.

Thank you Locatelli Rao DPT, OCS, PRC, Greer Mackie PT, DPT, OCS, Donald Ryan Hodge CSCS, LMT, and Beth Lewis for your help with live demonstration and discussion. We were so grateful. Thank you Taylor Boryca, PTA, for your Kolaches (Czech and Polish fruit pastry that I was raised on) that you served us. And most importantly, thank you Louise Kelley, DPT, PRC, Lori Thomsen, MPT, PRC, Dan Houglum, MSPT, ATC/L,PRC, Jean Masse, PT,OCS, ATC, PRC, and Lisa Mangino, PT, DPT, PCS, C/NDT, PRC for your integrative presentations and ongoing interaction. It was one of my favorite Advanced Integration courses that I have ever been a part of, or have given. Hopefully, if you haven’t been to one of these in recent years, you will consider coming in the next few.  Reach out and talk to someone who has attended this year’s AI course; and I believe you will be encouraged to attend or re-attend, regardless where you are in your PRI moments of time.

Click below to view full photo album,

ADVANCED INTEGRATION 2021 

Posted December 20, 2021 at 8:58PM

An Introspective Approach to the Treatment of Functional Cortical Predominance associated with forward movement of one’s body requires reliance on the observation of one’s mental state, as well as examination of one’s own conscious thoughts and feelings about physical mechanics. This course offers the PRI minded clinician an opportunity to explore the components of human cortical processing required for normal or natural, unilateral biomimicry of contralateral processes that are dominant in advancing oneself forward, into and though hemi-lateral and hemispheric forces, that may or may not be perceived or recognized.


Most individuals that do not have natural use, or flow of the four hemispheric components outlined in the Forward Locomotor Movement course, will express forward movement with suppression of one or more of the four components, for unilateral functional dominance, associated with ‘unnatural’ forward advancement of their body, and non-biomimetic formation and function.


Biomimetics is the study and development of synthetic or artificial systems that mimic the formation, function or structure of biologically produced substances and materials, or biological mechanisms and processes that are reproduced from unnatural behaviors. In the case of forward locomotor function, humans often ‘synthesize’ artificial mechanisms of movement by mimicking unnatural homolateral movement, which often results in similar bilateral patterns, that were established through biomimetic cortical processing.


When the contralateral function of the human body, produced by unnatural or compensatory function, that may or may not mimic the ipsilateral function, occurs, the human will rely on biomimetics to synthesize, fabricate or re-produce an acceptable ‘unnatural’ function, for the compensatory form required for safe, effortless, forward advancement of itself.   

 
This unnatural biomimetic behavior often becomes cortically represented and patterned with “natural” contralateral or unilateral function that is recognized, strengthened and patterned by existing functional cortical sites of respective human cortical dominance. This novel integrated patterned functional cortical dominance, along with the associated replacement of biomimetic components of novel, unnatural function, become embedded and accepted as natural neurologic function and flow, for future forward kinetic movement challenge and recognition.


By breaking down the four hemispheric biomimetic components humans use to move themselves forward, the attendee can gain a deep appreciation for the need to consider the influences the hemi-chests, arms, and the eyes can have on flow, effort and trajectory, when designing or outlining a program for the challenged forward mover of his or her body and legs.


Conversation like this, in a tertiary PRI course, is so easy for me to engage into with people who are willing to interact, acknowledge their confusion, share their opinions and provide clinical insight. I greatly appreciated the open dialogue with the live stream individuals who did just that. Laura Kompkoff OD, Ginger Mandy PT, Stephanie Ritter PT, and Kris Zeller-Hack MD, thank you so much for the interaction.


 I also want to thank Masa Abe, ATC, CSCS, Chad Beckman SCCC, PRT, CSCS, Heather Jenny PT, PRC, WCS, Yoshi Mitsuyama MS, ATC/L, PES, PRT, and Stuart Nichols, ATC who helped so much in demonstration, discussion and dialogue on topics that were made easier to discuss because of their actual presence. Actually, I appreciate all those who are here, in-person. Your travel, lodging and overall expense to be here is not overlooked, and I appreciate all of you who come to Lincoln, for any of our PRI courses. It is such an invaluable opportunity for any speaker. Thank you.

Posted November 30, 2021 at 10:37PM
Categories: Courses Science

One of the main objectives of this inaugural course was to help the participant gain an understanding on how the development of the human vocal tract resonance and articulation of speech is influenced by air pressure, and controlled through entrained exhalatory patterned function. Patterned exhalatory function, or voice, is most influenced by the position of the larynx, the trachea, and the esophagus, and through the available freedom the hypopharyngeal region of the neck offers.


Over adduction of the vocal cords severely impedes normal modes of vocal cord vibration and accentuates cervical tension from the accessory muscles of respiration, from the “lifting” muscles of the larynx and neck, and smooth muscles of the airway. Two of the most visible outward signs of over adduction of the vocal cords, is a prominent right sternocleidomastoid (extended, posteriorly rotated, and internally rotated right temporal bone) and a protruding left ear (flexed, anteriorly rotated, and externally rotated left temporal bone).


These two outward signs reflect the ongoing entrainment of deteriorative phonatory pitch effort (more than likely from the left temporal orientation) and disturbing auditory high pitch continuum (more than likely from the right temporal bone orientation). This intrinsic stricture, influencing both how we speak and hear ourselves speak, is the reflection of air pressure production, that is incapable of unrestricting temporal resonance entrained patterned function, that we have become accustomed to and rely on for identification of who we are as a physiologic, psychologic, and physical machine.


I feel honored to have had the emphatic opportunity to present to so many PRTs and PRCs. Thank you for showing interest and for your attendance.


Out of all the courses that I have written, out of all of the objectives in those courses that have been written and out of all the corollaries made, I feel so grateful to have had this opportunity to share this written work, for the first time. One of the most important attributes, that reflect most my course and objective effort, is that ‘brainwave entrainment revolves around patterned exhalatory function’, and this course allowed me to emphasis this concept through a review of research and literature from the world of “voice”, through a reflection of this Institute’s respect for pressure management, and through a strong case presentation.


I especially want to thank Ruth Hennessy, Hennessy Breath and BodyWork, and Ann Marie Pollard, Voice Realized, for sharing their insights and thoughts on subject matter that is dear to their heart and soul. They helped me discuss the role of the hypopharynx, that is not often associated with the inhibition effort of a right femoral adductor magnus, right internal and external obliques, left gluteus maximus, left psoas major, left pectoralis major, left anterior temporalis, and most important a right sternocleidomastoid muscle.


So much of my clinical and academic life has been centered around our need to express, explain, and explode alternation, through the regulation of intrinsic, biased patterned pressure, for the improvement of outward, unbiased positional performance. Our exploration in and of life depends on the re-reference and re-interference, offered through this plosive vocal ‘sounding’ and explosive plantar ‘pounding’.

Posted November 4, 2021 at 9:21PM
Categories: Courses Science

My maternal grandmother, Lucy, raised pedigree Saint Bernard dogs. Some of my best memories were traveling with her and her prized show dogs to “dog shows”. My brother and I would ‘dog-sit’ the dogs she was not showing on the runway. They were big dogs, with big mouths, to her 8 and 9  year old grandsons. But they were so lovable, slobbery, tongue friendly and gentle. They also had the cleanest teeth of any of the other dogs being shown. Grandma Lucy would say that clean, healthy, teeth on her Saint Bernards were one of the secrets to keeping their coats of hair beautiful and shiny, their overall social disposition, and their extended longevity.  She would often tell us that she believed a dog that could “keep” all its teeth, for as long as possible, would be a happy dog, and “to some degree” would generate better “pedigrees”.  I am not sure I believed her then, especially when I was given the responsibility of brushing slobbery dog teeth before they walked on a runway. None the less, I will always appreciate her for so many reasons, including responsibilities she gave me, like brushing canine teeth. She introduced the concept of  ‘epigenetics’ without ever talking to people like Dr. Singh. I will always be reminded of her phrase,  “to some degree”, when tying to make a point about something she believed had a corollary; which to grandma Lucy, was everything in life.

After many years of discussing material, presenting my thoughts, teaching concepts and writing on occlusal-cervical  and cervical-occlusal corollaries, I am beginning to see, hear and read inter-disciplinary discussion on patterned airway and occlusal cervical malfunction relationships, that contribute to and lead to pathology. It is exciting for me to watch and nurture these pedagogical moments, on many disciplinary fronts and confronts.

After presenting the Occlusal Cervical Restoration course on October 8th and 9th, I have received many emails and notes from course attendees, including dentists, who were so appreciative. The course was strengthened by Dr. James Carlson, a dentist who has written so much on the stomatognathic system, physiologic occlusion and orthocranial force, presence, input and confirmation. One dentist wrote, “to see your interactions with Dr. Carlson will never be forgotten”. This comment, followed by other comments from other participants, reinforce our mission, our intent and our desire to help create and foster communities of interdisciplinary minded providers. A community that appreciates the health of occlusion and oral alignment.

Dr. Carlson, in his 2005 publication on Physiologic Occlusion (a book that is now titled “Orthocranial Occlusion and Dentition Design”) wrote, “With the advancement of integrated health care it is becoming apparent that dentistry, osteopathy, chiropractic, medicine, optometry, physical therapy, massage therapy, and craniopathy have overlapping areas of concern: the head, neck, and face. The concept that the structural alignment of the maxilla, the position of the mandible, and dental occlusion affect the craniosacral mechanism, orbital bones of the skull, neuromuscular system, and the position of the cervical vertebra may be new to many dentists. However, with more dentists cognizant of the interdisciplinary approach to treating patients, the awareness of the concept is growing.” His presence at this course was such a gift, a privilege for all of those in attendance, including the 14 dentists and the other health care providers, that were also in attendance, some of whom work directly together. We will again be honored with his presence and presentations at next Springs PRI Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium (The Stomatognathic System: An Interdisciplinary Approach In The Management of Spatial Navigation and Structural Strength) next year on April 21-22nd. Because of his, and my, strong belief in integrating different disciplines, the health and happiness of the patients being served by an integrative team, should improve; ‘to some degree’.

Posted October 21, 2021 at 8:52PM
Categories: Courses Science

This workshop was a first for Jen Platt and I. Opening the workshop with discussion on corollary consequence, correspondence and compensation allowed us to “look” at the top-down influences of PRI Corollary Movement in each of the 12 secondary and tertiary techniques that Jen chose for us to cover. She did a great job in organizing these techniques, laying them out and selecting techniques that offered the attendee a wide perspective of application. Normally, we do not list testimonials after a course.  (You can find testimonials by courses by going to the ‘Programs and Courses’ site on our website).  However, after reading the feedback that Hannah compiled, I felt it would be helpful for those who may be interested in taking this course in the future, as well as to read what the ‘first-time’ attendees had to say about it.

 “I have already listened to at least 60% of the course material. I cannot tell you how much it helps to have the content available to go over again. This course put so many things together in regard to patterning. There were so many lightbulb moments into why things may fall apart for the patient at home with their exercise program because of the brain influence in regard to patterning. The word sense is so different than finding and feeling. Sensing something different in the body especially when sensing one thing can help the patient sense another area is HUGE in regard to making a program successful. Walking away from this course has had one of the most dramatic effects on putting the whole picture together, especially with the ability to go back and review it again. I hope that you can continue to offer the courses on zoom. I also wonder if any of the other recorded courses that were offered through zoom could ever be available as a take home course. It is nice to have that available as an option. Also wondering if Ron was ever going to put all the 33 corollary exercises together now that we understand the corollaries. I know that the other exercises are from other courses but we never had the corollaries with them. Thank you again for everything you all do!!!!”

“This course will allow me to progress all of my clients over the coming months and was a fantastic guide in sensory integration that I felt was a missing puzzle piece.”

“I have learned it in neuroanatomy but only in an abstract manner - now it becomes more meaningful for my work. Thanks!”

“I've always known the importance of multi sensory "sense", but this took my understanding a step further for sure”

“It feels like this course was a missing puzzle piece in my application. This made it much more straightforward to progress and cue clients”

“1. Greater confidence with technique selection 2. Deeper understanding & appreciation re: critiquing and cueing for a clients understanding of both positional and integrative sense”

“This course material will likely allow me help clients move to a higher level of motor learning much more efficiently and with less cognitive load (corollaries > references) especially in a fitness setting, but obviously also with rehab clients.”

“This is one of the MOST relevant courses offered by PRI to my area of practice in my opinion, moving away from more "attention intensive" movement practices towards integrated sense of corollaries will allow all of my clients, from pro athlete to rehab, to experience and sense the task at hand rather than trying to juggle a more cueing intensive task.”

“Thank you again for supporting the growth of PRI nation. We love you and this course was fantastic. When entering a black hole, one needs a guide named Ron Hruska. I can feel the effort, the labor of love, the hard work that has been put into this course (and all other courses). Thank you PRI team for continuing to lead the way. You inspire me to be better. Much love from Alpine PT in Seattle.”

I could not give this course, the way it was presented, without the direct input, production, and guidance that Jen provide both me and the audience. So grateful for her many roles she plays in this Institute, but now, because we know each other so well and the overall intent so well, the delivery and message is seamless, sincere and solid. This truly was the Institute’s first multisensory movement workshop that reflected the strength of the corollary movement sense needed for natural cognitive processing built around vestibular-ocular reflexive correlations. We also could not have made this workshop the ‘virtual reality’ workshop it was without the live presence of Amy Morris, PT, Phil DeNigris, CSCS, Rua Gilna, CPT, SFG1, PN1, and Dave Drummer, DPT, PRC. Their patience with my Socratic style of teaching and their willingness to objectively communicate what they felt, sensed, experienced and struggled with made multi-dimensional processing understandable and appreciable.

Thank you again for coming to Lincoln and participate in the manner in which each and every one of you did.  

Posted June 22, 2021 at 8:31PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

I really do not believe there is any non-PRI course that introduces and integrates the right brain with the left brain for forward movement, forward based anticipation, forward hemispheric automaticity, and forward movement dependency on patterned lateralized sense of flow, developed around the visual system, hemi-chest cavities, upper and lower extremities, like this one. I take in consideration the primary course references, as the Forward Locomotor Clinical Corollaries are considered, in the selection of one of ten eccentric left hamstring or right quadricep bi-hemispheric PRI techniques that are considered for forward locomotor movement (FLM) efficiency.
Simply put, I hope that those who attended this tertiary course will be able to preserve forward propulsion through panoptic imagery and cortical documentation, chest decompression and cortical documentation, upper extremity lift and cortical documentation, and lower extremity push and cortical documentation, with those who are having difficulty recognizing exchange from these bi-hemispheric senses. My exasperation of “Please write this down, even if it’s only in your head”, is my way of saying “please sense these cortical documentary journaling” that are required for left hemispheric functional logic and right hemispheric gestalt, structured around these four FLM components.

Forward Locomotor Movement, PRI Gait Cycle, Gait, Postural Restoration Tertiary Course, Ron Hruska


It was a wonderful two days of exchange between 50 plus attendees. And I enjoyed every minute talking about the facts behind limb movement and pendular displacement that’s necessary for us to ‘walk”.
As I write this today, my seventh grandchild and my first granddaughter, Vivien walked for her first time, ten complete FLM cycles, without support. The video makes her grandfather smile because her 13-month-old brain and body, represents the human lateralized hemispheric components of forward movement that gives her the intra personal and inter personal gifts of life she will use to perfect her FLM personality and patterned pendular print. She felt flow, freedom, fun and fifial love.

Posted June 15, 2021 at 5:00PM
Categories: Courses Science
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