Posts by Ron Hruska

The title of this artistic illustration reflects how our two lateralized hemi-rib cages operate when their top column of ribs move away from the central axis, or the spine. Bifarious is a botanical name for a structure that has parts arranged in two rows on either side of a central axis.  The Latin definition of ‘bifarious’ is ‘double’. These two representations of the anterior chest wall help clarify the likely degree of lateral flexion or thoracic wall abduction of each row of ribs, with respect to the lung, organ and neurologic asymmetry guidance. It reminds the viewer that they are not looking at one rib cage when you look at the chest or thorax. They are seeing double. Two chest walls that revolve and rotate around a central axis, making all our chest walls bifariously oriented.

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Posted October 4, 2018 at 3:02PM
Categories: Products

The definition of -ation is something connected with an action or process, or the process of doing something. I feel that I am doing this every time I teach this course. Processing references with desirable action to achieve outcomes that can become reprocessed through the integration of sense of this -ation. This can become a revelation for those who are struggling to change processing.  Once again I appreciate Finish Line Physical Therapy for hosting another course in NYC. Tying the last hour of the course, humeral - scapular - thoracic activity with the first hour of the course, calcaneus activity allows the attendees to complete a full circle of sensory referencing, clinically and personally. This group was great in not only participation but in helping Kentaro Ishii MS, ATC/L, PES, CE, PRT rethinking about course organization. Michael Macchiarulo PT, DPT and Monica Saenz DPT thank you for representing the RAIC/LBC and LAIC/RBC pattern references throughout both days. 

Monica Integrating R AIC/L BC references while Michael integrates L AIC/R BC references. 

Michael integrating R AIC/L BC references while Monica integrating L AIC/R BC references.

Brynn Fessette DPT, FAFS, Joshua DiLoreto ATC, and Chris Leib DPT, CSCS,Cert MD were awesome lab demonstrators and volunteers and enriched the course by their willingness to share their ‘sense’ of what they were feeling and integrating.  

But the best thing about teaching, is meeting new people, hearing new reasoning, and integrating new concepts based upon novice and novel experience. Boris Dugandzie and Dino Dogan were two people who exposed me to a culture and country that I knew vey little about. Because of them, Croatia is now on my travel destination bucket list. Their attendance helped me find a different kind of pronation and supination between two Croatians, who have little need to reach forwards or upwards with their arms and hands. Ron demonstrates the -ation, between the floor and the thorax between two Croatians, who struggle to find it.

Posted October 4, 2018 at 2:27PM
Categories: Courses

Regardless if you are a patient, a course attendee, a guest lecturer, or going there for consultation, when you enter the doors of The Cantrell Center for Physical Therapy, Sports Medicine and Wellness, you are family. The entire staff were engaging and enlightening.  All of the course attendees accommodated my needs to embed the center of our orientation, the orientation for autonomics, and the conduit of zones, i.e.  the foramen  magnum and the vertebral foramen of the atlas, in organized tri-planar revolving movement. They helped me teach future attendees that will appreciate the needs to embrace laterality, asymmetry and sensory integration for cervical function. The content of this course reflected the attendees willingness to consider the reasoning for the neck to revolve, as well as the reasoning to restore appropriate universal tension provided or placed on the neck and its contents. There was a wonderful example of a left Side Bend positioned cranium in class that was so willing to allow me to demonstrate re-positioning and re-patterning techniques with it. Courtney Stearn DPT owns this cranium and she and her cranium, cervical spine and cortex were anatomical gifts to all of us.  Her personality and behavior made the first day a complete day of enjoyment and learning. Thank you Courtney! Sitting to the right of Courtney was Amy Brown DPT who owned a cranium and neck that reflected right torsion through the sphenoid. She also contributed so much to the second day by allowing me to discuss her testing outcomes and her technique demonstration.  She could not have been in a better place or in a better time for this presenter.  Thank you Amy, we are all grateful for your attendance and willingness to share your head and neck.   

Course participation, by everyone, and I mean everyone, was awesome.  So thank you for making this weekend a very special one for me.   I can still see and hear Tassie Cantrell PT putting out strawberries and blueberries, putting furniture away afterwards, smiling ALL the time and answering questions on when she and her facility will be putting on another PRI course, and asking questions about O on A and A on O.

Lola Rosenbaum DPT thank you for being my “sphenoid” and Leah Whipple DPT thank you for being my “shift”.  And finally, Skip George DC, PRC, thanks for being there, and mentoring me, and guiding me, and listening to me, and assisting me, and putting up with my metaphoric satire, and for loving me.  

Posted September 19, 2018 at 7:22PM
Categories: Courses

Engaging into discussions regarding right lateral superior and posterior inferior chest wall expansion is so rewarding when the engagers truly want to understand the reasoning behind the intent and the outcomes purpose.  Regardless how we feel about internal physiologic or physical movement of our anatomy, we all stay alive through compression and decompression.  This course reviews the neuro-mechanical patterns of basic diaphragmatic decompression, i.e. expansion, and corresponding direction of compressive forces, i.e. abdominals and body position.  Having 50 engaged class participants from seven different areas of study, allowed all of us to compress and decompress not only in the lab setting, but during questions and answer sessions, that were as valuable, in my opinion as the material in the power point and in the manual.    Joseph Turic DPT, Aleena Kanner ATC, NASM, Beth Lewis and many others in the lab setting were so helpful in expanding minds, behavior and concepts.  Navin Hettiarachchi ATC, Dip MT, MCMT, ATC, PRT, CSCS and Sean Light MS, RSCC, LMT, CS, PRT, as lab assistants,  expand anyone or everyone that gets close to them with their smiles alone.   It was so wonderful to have Gail Wetzler DPT, EDO, BI-D, a very prominent Barral Institute instructor,  in attendance.  I am so grateful for the opportunity to get to know her better.  We were scheduled last year to present in Puerto Rico at the AAPMD conference, before Maria hit.   Please read my tweet on how people like her expand my moral compass.

Finally, I want to thank all the wonderful people at Finish Line Physical Therapy.

They not only allow us to expand PRI in the New York City region, again,  but actually took part in expanding this course by reviewing their lab discoveries, and by expanding my stomach through feeding me the peanut butter filled pretzels!  These have become a Finish Line staple of expansion. Thank you.  

Ron 

Posted August 8, 2018 at 6:58PM
Categories: Courses

The Impingement and Instability PRI Course is one of my favorite courses to relate PRI concepts with actual course attendee’s multiple interests and perspectives. It is also a wonderful course to establish relationships through similar mindsets and settings. The University of Arizona host site is a perfect place for this type of activity to take place. There were a number of people with different perspectives, interests and mindsets to make this course so beneficial for everyone in attendance, as well as, to appreciate reference integration reasoning from different pre- designed perspectives and pre-established relationships. 

Brittany Cline PT, DPT,ATC , Bruce Johnston ATC and the other University of Arizona host site attendees were and are so hospitable.

I enjoyed having Brittany’s 3 month old son, Jackson, in the course.  He attended both days and is sensing his right lateral chest and demonstrating to the class how to sense and use this reference center in one of the attached pictures. I am quite sure Jackson is the youngest course attendee I have ever had, and for the most part was all smiles both days.

 

Victoria Humphrey PT,  Samantha Yeoman ATC, and Nathanael Smith ATC, CSCS, thank you for being such willing class models. The weather was warm outside but everyone was so cool inside. I really enjoyed walking around this beautiful campus and hope that someday this host site will become a Postural Restoration Certified Center. I can understand how James Anderson MPT,PRC  loves these people, loves the facility and loves the food; even though Café Poca Cosa was closed for the summer. Jen, you can send me here anytime you want in the future. I also look forward to another great conversation on PRI Integration of I and I concepts with those who want to rest and relax with models of activity that include sleep, breathing, life enhancement programs and spirituality,  with Maria DelliVeneri ATC. Maria, it was so great to get to know you better. Thank all of you for your pursuit of PRI integration in your ‘musculoskeletal’ worlds.

Ron

Posted August 2, 2018 at 7:41PM
Categories: Courses

I remember initially meeting Dr. Davidson in February of 2014, in Philadelphia, at a Cervical Cranial Mandibular Restoration course.  It was his first PRI course. He has attended 20 PRI courses since that date and has helped countless students and individuals understand the human behavior from an adaptative, evolutionary and survival perspective.   After looking at his material for his presentation on “The Resistance as Reference, and the Loss of Authentic Environments” I know anyone who has an interest in “authentic elements of resistance” will not want to miss his perspectives on how to recognize it and benefit from it.   “With the loss of resistance built into our environments, many of us are losing a sense of purpose, have no clear direction in life, and feel unsatisfied’.  Pat is an open –minded, liberated, inquisitive and receptive individual with a background that makes him highly qualified for this symposium and topic.   And I can still remember his 2014 symbiotic smile and look forward to seeing it again in 2018! Learn more about the 2018 Interdisciplinary Course here.

Posted March 23, 2018 at 7:20PM
Categories: Courses

“With any change or growth there is inevitable resistance, struggle and a little pain.  Overcoming the status quo personally or professionally requires leaving some or many old notions behind that no longer work, or never really did, and learn that observations, questions and thinking about what is needed for patient and practitioner satisfaction sometimes means stepping out of a traditional way of thinking.”  This statement was made by Robert “Skip” George D.C., CCSP, CSCS, PRC and can be read along with other information about him by going to  the SD Voyager.   Skip has become one of my best friends.  I can’t imagine my life without him in it.  He has offered me so much genuine advice and has gained my trust and confidence because of  the way he manages himself around people who are interested in integrated engagement.    I met him at a PRI course that I instructed in 2012 and immediately felt his magnetic presence.   I really believed he would become a future faculty member after that one inspirational course and having the opportunity to spend some one on one time with him.   His acceptance and acquiescence of novel insight for the betterment of humanity left a lasting impression on me.  

He will be presenting a “A Chiropractor’s Perspective on Professional, Personal and Relationship Resistance” and his story and message is far from “ordinary.” I believe the same infectious ‘one on one’ experience that I had when I first met him, will be felt by anyone who is in the room, who is listening to him talk about how to resist, resistance to change.  As you will find out by his personal presentation, meaningful movement requires change.

Learn more about the 2018 Spring Symposium HERE.

Posted March 9, 2018 at 6:40PM

Feet continue to intrigue me.  We discuss the role of the calcaneus and its interaction with tibial and femoral function in the Impingement and Instability course.  I enjoyed discussing how the upper extremities play a destabilization role in the ankle and foot, and talus response to tibial rotation or the tibia response to talus orientation at last year’s Spring Symposium.  I am also beginning to appreciate how much one can extrapolate about the clinical functional status of the plantar surface of the foot by looking at the top of the foot.  These tibia, talus and calcaneus relationships and observation of the superior foot, outline and define the personality and behavior of the inferior or bottom of the foot. 

Jacqueline Shakar DPT, MS, PT, OCS, CMT, LAT has taken ten courses offered by the Postural Restoration Institute® and besides her roles she fills as Program Director and full time professor at the Physical Therapist Assistant program at Mount Wachusett Community College in Gardner MA, she is the lead instructor of Graston Technique® therapy.  She also maintains her clinical skills by practicing at Central Mass PT and Wellness in West Boylston, MA.  Her interest in the foot and its direct association with balance and gait, restricted or unrestricted, makes her a perfect fit for someone I want to listen to  regarding “core” function of the foot, and how it might influence our upright fear or security based behavior.  I am looking forward to her presentation on how she uses key evaluation tests and neuromuscular exercise interventions to reduce postural dysfunction and unnecessary tonicity.  

Posted March 5, 2018 at 5:34PM

Our 10th Annual Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium is coming up fast, and over the next few weeks I hope to shed some light on my enthusiasm for this event, so that you don’t miss this opportunity if you have the same interests.  These yearly symposium topics are selected based on experience and interests that developed though my patient interaction and intervention.  The topic selection is further strengthened by what I have read, witnessed, and discovered using lens that have various transparencies.  My perspective on the subject matter always is redefined and refined as I prepare for the symposium and as I work with each presenter and their related background and interest.  As April 19th approaches, I continue to recognize the re-occurrence of asymmetrical patterns of predictable functional and behavioral resistance.  We all “resist” when movement of the contralateral extremity, side, bone, etc. is not sensed moving in the opposite direction, secondary to behavioral resistance.  But we should also be mindful that resistance is required for directed expansion, unraveling, unfolding, respiration and compensation.

I chose the title “Postural Restriction:  An Interdisciplinary Approach to Alignment of Functional Patterns” because of its influence on alignment of malalignment.  Neurodevelopmental alignment, evolutionary alignment, pathologic alignment, inter-relationship alignment, and bi-pedal alignment as related to neurologic tension and soft tissue tension.  There are degrees of resistance in all of this “alignment,” as there are degrees of “malalignment.”  Patterns of resistance and re-tensing resistance guide and regulate us.  We all need resistance for meaningful growth and meaningful freedom.  Revolution sometimes is our only path to freedom, when meaningful growth succumbs to over-resistance.  A balance of tension is therefore, so important to all of us and I really hope this symposium will offer insight on how to achieve balanced resistance in day to day activity.   

In 2009, I read an article written by Matt Wallden, MSc Ost Med, BSc (Hons) Ost Med, CHEK IV , DO,ND who was an Associate Editor of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies and I have been following him and reading his work ever since.  I was so appreciative of his acceptance of our invitation to speak at this year’s Symposium on “The Evolutionary Basis of Tissue Restriction” and “Clinical Assessment and Interventions for Rebalancing the Body with Tissue Restriction.”  Matt lives in Surrey, UK and owns Matt Wallden Health & Performance, where he is clinically active as a C.H.E.K. practitioner, in addition to applying osteopathic and naturopathic philosophy and treatment.  Matt is also on faculty for the C.H.E.K Institute.  Our conversations with him have been so enlightening and I know he is truly looking forward to meeting all of you and integrate his thoughts regarding tissue restriction/resistance to clinical assessment and treatment.  I personally look forward to meeting him and spending time with him and know you will enjoy his delivery and personality.

Our other keynote speaker is also an osteopath and will be giving a presentation on “Archetypal Postures: What They Are and What Can Be Done To Achieve Them” as well as a discussion on “The Contractile Field:  A New Model of Human Movement.”  There is no speaker, writer, or individual who knows this subject material better than Phillip Beach, DO, DAC.  Phillip has a private practice in Wellington, New Zealand. In addition, he has lectured internationally for several years.  In 2010, he wrote a book entitled “Muscles and Meridians – The manipulation of shape.”  I feel so honored that he will be here in Nebraska to discuss relationships between symmetry, asymmetry and handedness as related to our archetypal posture and contractile fields of “default movement” and patterned vertebrates (humans).  I am very excited to hear him talk!  

Well that is a brief reflection….and over the next few weeks, I will continue to reflect on why I chose the other presenters and why they are so instrumental in this interdisciplinary engagement.  

Posted February 27, 2018 at 5:37PM
Categories: Courses

Giving a PRI course on occlusal positional consideration and occlusal influences on human positional sensorium and pattern was one of the highlights of my career and life. “After 45 years of ‘pre-dental major’ exploration, non-conformist intuitive processing and integrative pattern exposure and recognition and ‘irrational’ clinical appreciation that was built off of ‘effect and cause’ experience, “I was prepared to present ‘post –dental’ reasonings and recommendations. This first power point slide is powerful because it reflects my 45 years of pre-dentistry and the foundations of PRI. It is a course designed for dentists who are interested in patterned occlusion and its relationship to human patterned asymmetrical and functional limitation.

This was the first time I gave this one day course – however, I have been preparing 45 years to discuss spheno-palatine influence on bite patterns, teeth behavior  and personalities, the five meanings of ‘OA’ as related to that frontal plane, occlusal-calcaneal cortical function, and occlusal impact on dynamic freedom.

I want to thank Jen Platt for her ‘first row’ student perspective and advice and for her patience and producer role, that she has perfected over the years of working with this director. Other shout outs to Hannah Janssen for her acting and functional performance and to Matt Hornung for his editing, visual production and camera mastery. Without my comrades at the Hruska Clinic, refinement and resolution of this vast subject matter would be tyrannical. Jason Masek MSPT, ATC, CSCS, PRC, Lori Thomsen MPT PRC, Torin Berge MPT , PRC, Dave Drummer DPT, PRC and Heidi Wise OD, FCOVD. Thank you for your patience, kindness and ongoing support. I love you all so much.

I also want to thank Rebecca Hohl DDS MS, Chris Campbell DDS, Mark Vanicek DDS, Susan Christensen, DDS, and their respective staffs. Without their integrative mindedness and effort, the research that supports the didactic information provided by this course would have limited clinical significance and measurable outcomes.

The feedback and input were invaluable and I am excited for the next opportunity to relate human patterned asymmetrical occlusal contact and referenced sense to the asymmetrical pattern that coincide or contribute to human pattern development and the behavior recognized  by the Postural Restoration Institute

Posted February 16, 2018 at 9:37PM
Categories: Courses
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