Posts by Dan Houglum

MSPT, ATC/L, PRC

A few days before I was to present Postural Restoration, I reflected back to the number of times I had taken this course during my 17 year journey in PRI. We were fortunate to have nine movement specialists taking their first PRI course, and with the exception of two attendees, no one else attending the course had attended Postural Respiration previously. Since it was almost everyone's first voyage into this course material, I wanted to really focus on two topics that had escaped me in my previous attendance of this course: what/why/how surrounding Superior T4 Syndrome, and why do the R low trap/tricep and L serratus anterior/low trap hold such high significance in PRI for management of the BC pattern.  

We had lively discussion surrounding human asymmetry and how that asymmetry feeds into patterned respiratory mechanics, as well as the potential detriments of patterned breathing. Once we had the foundational concepts secured, we could move into the prevalence of the R BC pattern and what tests we could use to determine if the R BC pattern was overactive. Using the algorithm found on page 48, we were able to walk through manual and non-manual treatments, as well as spend a lot of time defining why and how Superior T4 Syndrome presents itself, and how to uncover the presence of Superior T4 Syndrome as a pathological, or "phony", respiration strategy.   

Algorithms are used frequently in PRI as a means to learn and improve ones ability to apply PRI concepts, particularly if the learner is new to PRI and the science behind it. Again, using page 48 as a backdrop, we were able to progress through why the R low trap/triceps is a necessary piece of R BC inhibition, but also why the L serratus anterior/low trap are necessary for security after proper management of Superior T4 Syndrome. We were also able to spend time in lab going through several of the non-manual techniques that support the manual techniques presented in this course. Since inhibition is such a huge part of PRI, we were able to focus on several non-manual inhibition techniques surrounding those individual who present with B PEC or B BC findings.

Being able to present this course in the clinic I work in with fellow PRC, Donna Parise-Byrne, was great. It was also rewarding to have fellow PRC, Jill Maida, in attendance as well. My thanks to Gail Trubow, Brock Mitchell, Anne Farkas, and Heather Pappas for their help during labs and asking great questions. We really had many great questions and dialogues over the course of the weekend. Thank you to all who attended the course as we took every precaution possible to ensure everyone felt safe, while still receiving the course content at a level that each individual needed.

Posted September 14, 2021 at 3:36PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

For many of us who have taken PRI courses over the years, Lincoln, Nebraska, often becomes a home-away-from-home. This has been particularly true in the last two years with the inception of PRI live-stream courses. It has been such a blessing for PRI to reach so many people via live-stream. In total, we had 78 people attend Impingement and Instability, with 20 of those having attended the course in previous years. However, only 5 individuals had attended the new and upgraded version of I&I before this weekend. Having six people live and in person was such a gift. It was an honor to have 11 PRC's and PRT's in the audience as well.

This course is a clinician's course, and we are able to make a lot of connections and links between several PRI courses in one weekend. Yes, this is a dense course with a lot of great information. The advantage of the live-stream is that all the attendees received the recording of the course for two weeks to listen to the material again. The ironic part of the "new" version of I&I is that a lot of the material is unchanged; the context and neurological links between the floor on the ground and the "floor" under the scapulae are significantly changed. This allows the attendee to further appreciate the "why" and "how" behind non-manual activity application and selection.

   

This course is dripping with neurology and is a gateway for the attendee to attend the PRI Forward Locomotion Movement, Cranial Resolution, Occlusal Cervical Restoration, and the new Voice Box course. We build off the three PRI primary courses to delve into how to apply those basic concepts using a higher level of decision making based on a neurological sensory framework. Hopefully, we were able to provide the attendees with that appreciation and help prepare them for future PRI courses.

My thanks to RJ Hruska for orchestrating the entire weekend. He was very helpful to me, and made my job much easier. We got so many great questions over the weekend, and we were able to answer most, if not all, of them.  And having six people live in the building provided an additional layer of questions and feedback. My thanks to Benjamin Sandman for his help with our calcaneal sensorium demonstration. He said it perfect when he said he was surprised at how much better he could sense the ground under his L calcaneus even after the demonstration was over.  

It was truly and honor to have attendees from 14 countries. It is amazing to think that this technology exists, and I am very thankful that fellow movement specialists were willing to spend time with us, even from the other side of the world. Even though most, if not all, of the 72 of the live-stream attendees were in their homes, it was comfortable for me as well to be in my home-away-from-home and spend some quality I&I time with so many like-minded peers. 

Posted August 26, 2021 at 4:19PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

It would be a colossal understatement to say that the last 18 months have been a substantial change for everyone on the planet. However, for this one weekend, it was very refreshing to get a slice of normalcy. It was my distinct honor to teach Myokinematic Restoration to a group of movement specialists in Lombard, IL. It was exceptionally refreshing for me to interact with this diverse and eager group of peers.  

Our exploration into normal mechanics and eventually transferring into the patho-compensatory mechanics that can result from living and performing in a pattern. Discussing which muscles are properly positioned compared to muscles that are poorly positioned allowed us to proceed to testing. This is the only course in PRI that allows us to explain and have lab time specific to the Hruska Abduction and Adduction Lift tests. The relatively small class size provided us ample opportunity for lab on Day 2. This course has always had a lot of lab time built into it, and we had nearly 7 hours of lab time. We were able to explain and perform 16 PRI Non-manual activities. It was a blessing to have that much lab time.

 

It was wonderful to have a PRI veteran, Ryne Gioviano, in attendance. Having his perspective and insight with very helpful. Brandee Barbee, Terris Hightower, Ryan Daniels, Kasia Galica, and Shirley Montoya were exceptionally helpful with their questions and perspective. It was an honor to have Dr. Stephen Sikorsky in attendance as well. Having a chiropractor in the audience provides level of clinical experience and expertise that is undeniable and very helpful to fellow attendees.

 

Thank you to those who attended as it felt closer to normal. Here's hoping we all get back to normal sooner than later.     

Posted August 10, 2021 at 3:26PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

The "flagship" course in PRI is Postural Respiration because how and where air enters our body facilitates how the rest of the body performs. This is a very dense course with a lot of research and neurology behind the musculoskeletal ramifications of faulty airflow patterns. The huge advantage this live-stream course provided is the ability of the course attendee to go back and listen to the course material again for two weeks. We were fortunate to have a few in-person attendees as well as many on-line live streaming attendees.

I've had the pleasure of teaching via live-stream several times since March of last year. However, this was the first course I've taught that had a lab component since November 2019. It was very rewarding and refreshing to have the opportunity to interact with in-person humans again during a PRI course. I have missed the human interaction while teaching PRI. I know that all of the PRI faculty feel the exact same way; Ron probably more than any of us. It was a very enjoyable experience.

90-90 Hip Lift, Postural Restoration, Postural Respiration

We were able to dive deep into the neurological ramifications of human asymmetry, the potential role of dynamic respiration, and the potential negative affects of patterned respiration. Once we were able to fully delve into neurology of respiration, the AIC and BC patterns relative to respiration became a more fluid learning experience. The discussion around the left diaphragm's need for a team of muscles to assist in its endeavor to perform inhalation as well as the rib and sternal mechanics behind trunk rotation were topics of conversation that provided lively questions and conversation. These conversations permitted a deeper explanation into how and why Superior T4 Syndrome develops, as well as how to assess and manage it.  

The goal was to provide the attendee as much information as possible without overwhelming the new-to-PRI attendee. This opportunity is afforded to us by the live-stream event. With time to go back and listen to the information to help digest and understand topics that may be challenging or difficult, we are able to go a little deeper and a little faster into these concepts.

   

This course is different and has evolved over the last few years. If you haven't attended Postural Respiration in the past, or haven't attended in a while, I would recommend finding a way, sooner than later, doing so because of the many upgrades to this "flagship" course.

Posted May 27, 2021 at 4:10PM
Categories: Courses Science

"The new normal."  That's a phrase we all have heard many times during the last 10 months. As we are all adjusting to what that phrase means to us individually on a personal level, all of us are adjusting to what that means with regards to our relationships with each other as well. We are all finding new boundaries, and freedoms, associated with this "new normal."  

PRI opened the 2021 year with the newly revamped Impingement and Instability course, which introduces the concept that impingement and instability are both necessary and vital for optimal human performance. They provide new boundaries and freedoms that allow us to be able to oscillate between our two hemispheres of our body and brain. Our body needs to find a "new normal" with these new parameters in order to appreciate the left side of our body and the right hemisphere of our brain. As I reminded the course attendees, the question isn't "are you going to get onto your left leg?", the question is "how are you going to get onto your left leg?"  

This upgraded course introduces the neuromechanical concepts to answer the question of "how", as this course serves as a gateway into the other PRI Secondary and Tertiary courses, such as Forward Locomotor Movement. This is the material Ron was looking to introduce 20 years ago, and it is my honor to be able to help provide the neurological answers to the question "how are you going to get onto your left leg?" As we discussed during the entirety of the weekend, the how is rooted in one's ability to compress, or impinge, certain areas of the body, and decompress, or destabilize, other areas of the body. In order for the brain to appreciate these novel concepts, we need to provide the cortex of the brain with novel reference centers for proper inhibition of functional cortical dominance.

As we embarked on our "new normal, " not only in 2021, but in our cerebral cortical function, this course has now become much less of the orthopedic course it had to be several years ago, but has progressed into the neuromechanical blueprint for behavior modification that Ron had intended from Day 1 of the Institute. This course has always been my personal favorite of all the PRI courses offered because it is a clinician's course as it provided me a more integrated manner to apply the information I had learned in the three PRI introductory courses. My appreciation for this course has grown dramatically due to the necessary evolution from an orthopedic delivery to a neuromechanical, cohesive, and expansive delivery of PRI concepts. As the attendees of the course can attest to, Impingement and Instability helps our body's ability to appreciate the "new normal" from the inside out.

Posted January 21, 2021 at 5:31PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

This was the last offering of Myokinematic Restoration for 2019. And what a way to end the year! We had a great group of chiropractors, athletic trainers, physical therapists and PT assistants,  strength coaches, personal trainers, and cranial therapists.  I was very excited to get to sunny northern California, as the we got 4-6 inches of snow the day before I left. Which made for a miserable Halloween.  

Fortunately, only treats and no tricks with PRI! This course affords us the luxury of spending a lot of time in lab.  Nearly 40% of the class is spent in lab, which provides the attendee ample opportunity to find, feel, and experience the science of PRI. This course also provides ample time for us to discuss, explain, and digest the Hruska Adduction and Abduction Lift Tests as a means of determining one's ability to walk and breathe. If walking and breathing require compensation, everything will require compensation.  

We had a great discussion about sympathetic vs. parasympathetic nervous system activity related to pelvic positioning, foot and ankle performance, and how the acetabulum position dictates femoral activity.  

My thanks to Shaun Buchanan and Joan Shepherd Mellows for hosting us and all the logistical work that goes into a successful weekend.  My thanks to Jenn Gaskin, Brian Schulman, John Garland, Cody Gilliss, Michael Serrano, and Tracy Henry for all of their great questions and help during demonstrations.  

But this weekend wouldn't have worked nearly as well if it weren't for Will Waterman, PRC, and Tim Dempsey, PRT. They were fantastic lab assistants and were a great help during the entire course. Without a doubt, they were instrumental to helping this diverse group digest this information. Looking forward to 2020!

Posted November 11, 2019 at 5:04PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

If you have attended Myokinematic Restoration in the past, but not since the course received a make-over in 2016, I suggest you strongly consider attending. If you haven't started your PRI journey, this course is one of the PRI introductory courses, and is a great way to begin that journey. A couple of changes that were made in 2016 that I appreciate compared to the version I first took in 2004 are that now we have a lot more time for lab, we are able to discuss and spend time in lab on both of the Hruska Lift tests, and we are discussing some ankle mechanics related to the L AIC pattern.

 

This most recent Myokin class is an excellent representative sample of these changes.  This class was nearly 40% lab.  So everyone was able to find, feel, and experience the muscles required to inhibit the L AIC pattern.  We were able to spend a solid amount of time on the Hruska ABD and ADD Lift tests with lab and explanation of both tests.  And we had a lively discussion about how calcaneal position and mechanics influence and are influenced by the L AIC pattern.

This class had a lot of great participation, as every single participant asked a question, which helps everyone learn. My thanks to Ken Guzzardo for hosting our course. My thanks to Amy Corbin, Amanda McDevitt, Jaclyn Marino, Ivan Salazar, Kristian Flores, Aidan Scotland, and Jamil Skakoor for their excellent questions and re-states. Really, my thanks to all the course attendees for their interest and many awesome questions.  

It was a true pleasure to have Neal Hallinan as the lab assistant. He's a PRI Black Belt, and he's speaking at Interdisciplinary Integration in April 2020. He's going to kill it! 

Posted October 28, 2019 at 4:48PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

Jason Miller, PT, PRC, was our host for Myokinematic Restoration last weekend in Missoula, MT.  Jason has been using PRI for quite a while, and this was a great opportunity for Jason's co-workers to get exposed to the science of PRI.  Nearly half the audience were from Jason's facility, which will really assist those new to PRI in their journey.  It's always easier to have co-workers along side for the ride.  My thanks to Marla, Seth, Samantha, Kristina, Kailey, Erika, Jessica, and Sydney, as well as Jason's wife, Jill,  for their willingness to learn and ask great questions.  

Dan Houglum, Myokinematic Restoration, Postural Restoration Institute, Primary Course

It was a great group of movement professionals, and a nice mix of those new to PRI, and those who had been exposed to PRI previously.  We started the weekend talking about positional influences on femur position and performance, as well as why and how AF position directs FA performance. We proceeded into which muscles are available and unavailable while in the L AIC pattern. This introductory 5.5 hours of didactic information is the foundation upon which the rest of our weekend was built. And it will provide a solid foundation for those new to PRI to build from as well.  

Myokinematic Restoration - Postural Restoration Primary Course

Once the groundwork had been laid, then we can start getting into the real value of PRI: getting off the right leg and onto the left leg correctly without compensation. The role the Hruska ADD and ABD tests play in that endeavor cannot be overstated. We were fortunate to have a lot of time to dedicate to these valuable tests. Additionally, we were able to experience, find, and feel inhibitory and faciliatory techniques, which allowed us to bring together both days of learning into a great time of lab.

Myokinematic Restoration - PRI Primary Course

We had a great crew of attendees. In addition to Missoula Bone & Joint group, I greatly appreciated Tim Cordial's questions, Amy Downing's help in lab, and Mandi Nystrom's willingness to be our volunteer during demonstration.

Again, my thanks to Jason and his crew for a great weekend. Looking forward to the next trip to Missoula!

As all the PRI Faculty will tell you, having the opportunity to teach a PRI course in Lincoln at the Postural Restoration Institute is kind of like a homecoming. Even though it isn't really our "home court," it does feel like it. That's a testament to Hannah, RJ, Sage, and, of course, Ron and Jen. As I said in our introduction at the beginning of the course, those new to PRI couldn't have picked a better course than this one for their first dive into the science of PRI.

Myokinematic Restoration, Lincoln NE, Postural Restoration Institute

It was such a great experience to teach with Kasey Aikin, our newest PRI faculty member. She did an awesome job, and I'm eager to watch her develop and grow into her new role. We had two other PRC's in attendance as well this weekend: Lisa Bartels and Jason Masek. They have been integrated in PRI for many years, and it was so beneficial to the attendees to have them in class and during lab. Additionally, we had five other attendees who had attended multiple PRI courses prior to this one.

Myokinematic Restoration, Lincoln NE, Postural Restoration Institute

Myokinematic Restoration, Lincoln NE, Postural Restoration Institute

With all the experience in the room, with Ron and Jen providing context during the course and lab, and with the interest and energy from the attendees, the course proved to be a very fertile environment for those new to the science of PRI. Kasey presented an excellent opening and really set the table for the rest of the weekend. We opened the course with discussing osteokinematics and myokinematics surrounding the relationship between the pelvis and femur. And we finished the day with a great repositioning wrap up, which lead us right into Day 2. Kasey again set the table with another stellar opening session, and the table was set for our day of lab.

Dan Houglum, Postural Restoration Institute

Our lab times were very productive and engaging. And a lot of it was due to where we were, and the expertise in the room. I have to thank Lisa, Jason, and Jen for their help during our labs. Kasey ran a great lab session on Sunday afternoon, as well. We were fortunate to have nearly 7 hours of lab during this course. We had a 4.5:1 ratio of student to PRC in the lab. I'm not sure the first time attendees realized how valuable the lab time was, and how much we were able to get out of the time we had.

My thanks to Jennifer Bacon, Meghann Vanslager, Kelli Reilly, Kellen Goertzen, Joe Siracusano, Kristen Wassung, and Benjamin Sandman for their wonderful questions. Honestly, we had great questions from nearly everyone in the room. I think every course attendee asked a question at some point during the weekend, which just shows how great a group we were fortunate to have. For many reasons, this particular Myokinematic Restoration course was unique, and Kasey and I feel very fortunate to have been a part of it.

It was a humbling experience to be on the campus of the Naval Academy teaching Myokinematic Restoration the weekend following Memorial Day. It's a weekend that will resonate with me for a long time for a variety of reasons. I have three relatives who have served in the Navy, so to be on that historical campus was truly a privilege.

It was also a privilege to be able to deliver PRI concepts to a fantastic group of diverse movement professionals. We had ATC's from the Naval Academy as well as from other institutions, LMT, Strength Coaches, PT's, and DC's. Mike Barnard, DC, it was truly an honor to meet you and I thank you for your questions and contributions to the course. With such a diverse crowd, we were permitted to expand our conversation points around many scopes of interest and practice.

Our course was held in Akerson Tower at the football field. During our course, the artificial field turf was being pulled up and removed. It was an apt backdrop for our course because, not unlike the football field, PRI was peeling off layers of preconceived notions in the minds of the course attendees. Once the truth of human asymmetry was revealed and the ramifications of it, we were able to start delivering a new layer of Myokinematic and neuromechanic foundation that they will be able to build on top of moving forward in their PRI journey.

Another unique revelation for me this past weekend occurred when fellow PRI Faculty member, Louise Kelley, and I met for dinner, and she brought her husband, Bruce. I can confirm, Bruce does exist, and we had a wonderful time Saturday night.

My thanks to Nate Nester, Jill Tender, Laurie Johnson, Ryan Carr, Greer Mackie, Vikram Somal, Christine Von Ulrich, and Johnathan Blake for their questions and their willingness to allow us to learn from them. Johnathan is going to be in attendance next weekend when Louise Kelly teaches Postural Respiration in Boston, which is going to be awesome! Cindy Anderson, PT, PRC, was invaluable during the lab portions of the class, as well as providing her valuable insight to delivering PRI concepts.

Progressing through the L AIC pattern, potential pathology that can result, and which muscles can and cannot work because of the position they are in is a lot for anyone new to PRI to digest. But we had many, many attendees who were able to digest the "why", so progressing into the testing and treatment portions of the class were relatively seamless. We were afforded a lot of time for lab, which allowed the attendees to experience getting onto their L side for the first time in a long time. This particular Myokin class will stand out for me because of where we were, the time of year, the symbolism of the football field turf being peeled away, and how stellar the class attendees were. It was a privilege to be among you.

Myokinematic Restoration Postural Restoration Institute at the US Naval Academy Football Stadium

Myokinematic Restoration Postural Restoration Institute at the US Naval Academy Football Stadium

Postural Restoration Institute Dan Houglum Louise Kelley Bruce Kelley

Posted June 4, 2019 at 7:55PM
Categories: Courses
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