Posts by Dan Houglum

MSPT, ATC/L, PRC

It's been a great pleasure to work with Louise Kelley and Skip George as we endeavored to help the Flagship Course of PRI, Postural Respiration, become a more digestible course. It is really the foundation of the neurology behind PRI concepts as well as the link between the other Primary PRI courses and the Secondary and Tertiary courses. The goal was to help the course attendee leave with a solid understanding of the neurology behind dynamic respiration, and how to test for, and manage, patterned airflow.

It was very rewarding to have such a diverse group of attendees. We had 10 in-person, and 36 on live stream. We had chiropractors, dental hygienists, physical therapists, athletic trainers, yoga instructors, personal trainers, and a physical therapy student. This diversity led to wonderful questions and opportunities to further explain and digest concepts. The in-person group were wonderful to work with in lab, and the live stream group had several excellent questions and comments on the lab as well.

 

Hopefully the nearly two hours of explanation and discussion surrounding the R BC pattern, scapular position, why the tests look the way they do, page 44, and Superior T4 syndrome was helpful for the attendees. We were able to spend a lot of time in lab working on manual and non-manual techniques, as well as working our way through page 50 to help organize our thoughts into an organized treatment algorithm.

My thanks to Jennifer Bell, Sharee Jedlicka, Deanna Stewart, and Ryan Esdohr for your questions and help during lab. My thanks to RJ, which again did a masterful job directing our live-stream event. It was so great to get questions from Juliana Kroese, Dave (Birthday Boy) Shamash, Alan Lee, Kimberly DelVecchio, and Ivonne Gonzales while they were on live stream. Excellent questions all around!

With this course coming right before Halloween, or as my high-school aged children call it, "Free Candy Day," my holiday wish for the course attendees is that they don't find Postural Respiration spooky or haunting, but find it friendly and enchanting!

Posted November 7, 2022 at 5:47PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

Every PRI course has its own unique flavor, and the major reason for that is the attendees. We had a unique blend of movement specialists for this recent Myokinemtatic Restoration course. Many times, upwards of 80-90% of the attendees have not taken a PRI course before, and usually the remaining attendees may have had a prior PRI course, but not Myokin. What made this course unique was most of the attendees had taken a PRI course prior to this one, and for a few folks, they had taken many PRI courses. It was a treat to have Skip George, DC, PRC, PRI Faculty in attendance. Skip's point of view was exceptionally helpful, as he is able lend a chiropractor's perspective to PRI since we had another chiropractor in attendance. It was an honor to have Lucy Yu, DPT, LMT, in attendance.

Lucy wrote a fantastic article regarding PRI and evidence based practice (EPB), and it is in the back pocket of every Myokin manual. I have seen her name many, many times, and read her paper many times as well. She was kind enough to spend a few minutes discussing her paper and how, by any criteria, PRI meets the standard of EBP. It was a wonderful conversation, and further strengthens the science of PRI by demonstrating its absolute support by research.

Craig Depperschmidt, DPT, PRC, and Jason Miller PT, PRC, are training to teach Myokin, and they did an incredible job. When learning a new concept, it is helpful to hear several different perspectives surrounding the topic, as different perspectives often allow the material to resonate more easily with more people. We were blessed to have three speakers for this course, lending clinical experience, as well as personal perspective to the material. It's not often that the live attendees receive almost one-on-one attention during our labs, but that's essentially what we had with three instructors and four live attendees. Myokin is roughly one-third lab time, so our in-person attendees were able to experience all of the tests and non-manual techniques on themselves several times during lab.

My thanks to our live attendees, and their willingness to learn, ask questions, and allow us to use them for demonstration. Their attendance helped the learning process for the live stream attendees, in lab as well as in demonstration. We are very thankful to Angela Marchant, JJ Miranda, Paul McMahon, and Gabrielle Williams-Hubbard. We know you all came a long distance to be with us, and we greatly appreciate your attendance.

And it was Jason Miller's birthday! It was an honor that Jason was willing to spend his birthday weekend helping to teach the science of PRI. It was probably a wise decision on his part to not let any of us know that it was his birthday during the course. There is a small chance we would have called him Birthday Boy the entire weekend. Despite that lost opportunity, this was a very unique and memorable course.

Posted July 21, 2022 at 3:03PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

The pacific northwest has been a PRI hot bed for several years. The enthusiasm for the science and clinical application of PRI is palpable. It was my honor to have the opportunity to teach a fantastic group of movement professionals in Seattle. We had five PRC's in attendance for this newly updated I&I course.  

This course is the perfect gateway to several PRI courses, including Cranial Resolution, Forward Locomotor Movement, and the Primary Non-manual Techniques Workshop. Our conversation starts with introducing the neurological learning process that the body needs in order to inhibit patterned behavior: alternating compression and decompression. This important concept is the foundation we build from as we progressed from the calcaneus to the femur and pelvis and into the scapula.

 

Founded in the concept of alternating compression, we were able to delve into medial and lateral hamstring relationships, as well as when and how to apply the right serratus anterior and subscapularis into a program. Along the way, the necessity of compression of talar bone and calcaneus, and management of pelvic inlets and outlets provide the necessary sense the body needs to allow the body the freedom it desires above T8.

I cannot thank the staff from Alpine Physical Therapy enough. Jeremiah Ferguson, DPT, PRC, Christopher Murphy, DPT, PRC, and Eva Bilo, DPT, were the perfect hosts. A huge shout out to their friend who was kind enough to loan us his projector for the weekend. It would have been a very different course without his generosity. My sincere thanks to the Alpine crew for all of their help.

We were fortunate to have a great mixture of seasoned PRI veterans as well as several who are relatively new to PRI. My thanks to Trevor Corrado, Jeff Fjelstul, David Shamash, and Katie Schaner for their willingness to ask questions.  In addition to the Alpine staff, it was wonderful to have Erin Coomer, Zach Hawthorne, Wren McLaughlin, and Betsy Baker-Bold contribute their experience and perspective to the audience. It was helpful to have others in the audience provide their clinical validation to the topics of I&I.

Many thanks for a wonderful experience in a truly gorgeous region of the country!

Posted April 13, 2022 at 4:09PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians Science

Without a doubt, the opportunity to present the science of PRI to a live group of movement professionals was a great sign to me that we are getting closer and closer to the resumption of our previous "normal" lives. I had never had the pleasure of speaking in Massachusetts previously, and it was a wonderful experience. The newly updated Impingement and Instability course provides a neuromechanical explanation of the "why" behind many PRI concepts and how to apply the science to a variety of conditions and patient populations.

We were able to link the scapula to the calcaneus, femur, and pelvis, so by the time we got to scapular instability, we have the freedom to discuss other avenues of treatment and concepts that we previously were unable to discuss. This is the course we have the opportunity to dive into the concept of talar wobble, balancing hamstring activity, and the pressure sensitivity of the scapula.

Our exploration into the value of pressure management and how pressure is the "Morse Code" of postural and body awareness, as well as how the body learns to make changes to movement strategies was lengthy. This course provides the opportunity to go down some rabbit holes that we ordinarily are unable to proceed into in other courses.   

My thanks to the entire Train Boston crew for a great venue and very welcoming experience. It was an honor to have three certified individuals attend the course: Mike Mullins, Donna Behr, and Phil DeNigris. It was wonderful for me to have your questions and feedback, and those who were newer to PRI appreciated it as well. Thank you for a wonderful weekend and getting back to "normal."

Posted March 28, 2022 at 8:57PM
Categories: Courses Science

The Impingement and Instability course was the kick-off for PRI in 2022, and I was fortunate to be able to have several friends and colleagues in the audience. With this course being updated only two years ago, it has a decided different feel compared to the previous iterations. We were fortunate to have nearly 50 attendees via Zoom from 10 different countries, and 8 movement professionals in-person. With so much PRI experience "in the room", both in-person and virtual, we were afforded the luxury of delving into the neurology of PRI.  

Our ability to make substantial and long-standing change to our posture is dependent upon our ability to change how our brain perceives the environment and gravity.  This course explains how that occurs and why reference centers are a better "road map" for us to be able to modify our patterns and habits.  Starting at the calcaneus and talus, we discussed integration of the femur and why we need it to be unstable, which lead us to the pelvis and why pelvic inlets and outlets are linked to the calcaneus.  We were able to spend nearly 4 hours on linking the scapula and underlying thorax to the pelvis and femur and calcaneus.  Our ability to compress and decompress several different "floors" on each side allows our body to make sense of this Morse Code-like alternation for improved posture, patterns, and respiration.  

My thanks to the entire crew from Edge Physical Therapy: Beth, Mike, Brett, and Eric. Thank you for your questions and dialogue. And thank you to Meg and allowing us to learn from your experience of what it finally means to feel the floor under your feet.  And thanks to Lori Thompson and taking the time to go through the Shoe List.  That was a perfect conversation at the part of the course, and I truly hope those in attendance understand just how unique that experience was for all of us.  Thanks to all of those who attended, and here's to a wonderful 2022!

Posted January 20, 2022 at 11:04PM
Categories: Courses Clinicians Science

Timing is a tricky thing, isn't it? Difficult to measure. Tough to describe. Hard to master. But once you find timing, or timing finds you, it can dramatically change any outcome. Aren't we all searching for that nebulous and elusive thing called "timing"? One of the main overall goals of PRI is to improve neuromuscular timing to reduce patterned behavior. Timing is kind of like a unicorn with a majestic, golden mane; you know it when you see it.   

Last weekend it was my distinct pleasure to teach Myokinematic Restoration to 68 movement specialists, 45 of which were new to the science of PRI. We had 10 individuals in person, and two of them were my good friends Craig Depperschmidt, DPT, PRC and Jason Miller, PT, PRC, both of whom are new additions to our PRI faculty. We are lucky to have them. We had a group of 18 co-workers attending the live-stream together. It was daylight savings, which means we got an extra hour of sleep Saturday night. And we had a unicorn in our midst. We were fortunate to have had several unique events occur this weekend that I feel blessed to have all been able to share the experience with 68 friends, old and new.

One of our objectives in this course is to learn how to correctly interpret the tests and let them lead us into our treatment approach. Another objective is to understand how and when to use ligamentous muscle to stabilize an unstable hip capsule. For those of you who have taken this course before, you've experienced the lab portion on the second day, and we usually are able to get to around 7 or so PRI non-manual techniques. On this unique weekend, we were able to get to 15 techniques in lab. Part of it was the small class size during lab, but Craig and Jason were an enormous reason we were able to get to so many activities. It was just a unique experience afforded to those in attendance in-person and on the live stream. This extensive lab time allowed us to dive into the algorithms on pages 49 and 52, as well as the inhibition section of the appendix.  We used page 48 as a treatment flow chart, and proceeded through that page as a decision-making tree to help the attendees solidify examples of how to apply the science of PRI upon returning to their clients and patients. Do what the tests tell you to do. Reposition. Do page 39. Retest. Do what the tests tell you to do.

One of the best teaching examples for this course is an example of someone who fits the description of the algorithm on page 49, and the algorithm on page 52. Ron did this for me in my very first Myokin class in 2004, and it helped me remember how different these patients can present. It is pretty easy to find someone in the course during lab who presents with testing representative of page 52; however, finding someone who fits the description on page 49 is kind of like finding a majestic unicorn with a flowing golden mane. In 6 years of teaching this course I had only met one unicorn, until this weekend. Our unicorn's name was Brett, and he provided us with an exceptional example of how and why testing matters, and how testing helps drive the treatment decision-making tree on page 48.  

My thanks to all of those who attended on live-stream. Your questions clearly indicate you were engaged and were thinking ahead to future courses. Your questions were spot-on and I am looking forward to seeing many, many of you in future PRI courses.
 
My sincere thanks to Brett Shulte, Alison Janky, Savannah DeVault, and Angie Nixon. Your willingness to be our models for demonstration provided all of us with an exceptional learning experience. My thanks to RJ for his excellent production of our live stream, and to Jason and Craig for keeping me honest and helping us get through as much lab as we did.  

So, to recap......
Fantastic in-person and live stream audience. Excellent questions all around. Unbelievable lab. A splendid unicorn. An extra hour of sleep.
Timing is everything.  

Posted November 18, 2021 at 6:50PM

A few days before I was to present Postural Restoration, I reflected back to the number of times I had taken this course during my 17 year journey in PRI. We were fortunate to have nine movement specialists taking their first PRI course, and with the exception of two attendees, no one else attending the course had attended Postural Respiration previously. Since it was almost everyone's first voyage into this course material, I wanted to really focus on two topics that had escaped me in my previous attendance of this course: what/why/how surrounding Superior T4 Syndrome, and why do the R low trap/tricep and L serratus anterior/low trap hold such high significance in PRI for management of the BC pattern.  

We had lively discussion surrounding human asymmetry and how that asymmetry feeds into patterned respiratory mechanics, as well as the potential detriments of patterned breathing. Once we had the foundational concepts secured, we could move into the prevalence of the R BC pattern and what tests we could use to determine if the R BC pattern was overactive. Using the algorithm found on page 48, we were able to walk through manual and non-manual treatments, as well as spend a lot of time defining why and how Superior T4 Syndrome presents itself, and how to uncover the presence of Superior T4 Syndrome as a pathological, or "phony", respiration strategy.   

Algorithms are used frequently in PRI as a means to learn and improve ones ability to apply PRI concepts, particularly if the learner is new to PRI and the science behind it. Again, using page 48 as a backdrop, we were able to progress through why the R low trap/triceps is a necessary piece of R BC inhibition, but also why the L serratus anterior/low trap are necessary for security after proper management of Superior T4 Syndrome. We were also able to spend time in lab going through several of the non-manual techniques that support the manual techniques presented in this course. Since inhibition is such a huge part of PRI, we were able to focus on several non-manual inhibition techniques surrounding those individual who present with B PEC or B BC findings.

Being able to present this course in the clinic I work in with fellow PRC, Donna Parise-Byrne, was great. It was also rewarding to have fellow PRC, Jill Maida, in attendance as well. My thanks to Gail Trubow, Brock Mitchell, Anne Farkas, and Heather Pappas for their help during labs and asking great questions. We really had many great questions and dialogues over the course of the weekend. Thank you to all who attended the course as we took every precaution possible to ensure everyone felt safe, while still receiving the course content at a level that each individual needed.

Posted September 14, 2021 at 3:36PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

For many of us who have taken PRI courses over the years, Lincoln, Nebraska, often becomes a home-away-from-home. This has been particularly true in the last two years with the inception of PRI live-stream courses. It has been such a blessing for PRI to reach so many people via live-stream. In total, we had 78 people attend Impingement and Instability, with 20 of those having attended the course in previous years. However, only 5 individuals had attended the new and upgraded version of I&I before this weekend. Having six people live and in person was such a gift. It was an honor to have 11 PRC's and PRT's in the audience as well.

This course is a clinician's course, and we are able to make a lot of connections and links between several PRI courses in one weekend. Yes, this is a dense course with a lot of great information. The advantage of the live-stream is that all the attendees received the recording of the course for two weeks to listen to the material again. The ironic part of the "new" version of I&I is that a lot of the material is unchanged; the context and neurological links between the floor on the ground and the "floor" under the scapulae are significantly changed. This allows the attendee to further appreciate the "why" and "how" behind non-manual activity application and selection.

   

This course is dripping with neurology and is a gateway for the attendee to attend the PRI Forward Locomotion Movement, Cranial Resolution, Occlusal Cervical Restoration, and the new Voice Box course. We build off the three PRI primary courses to delve into how to apply those basic concepts using a higher level of decision making based on a neurological sensory framework. Hopefully, we were able to provide the attendees with that appreciation and help prepare them for future PRI courses.

My thanks to RJ Hruska for orchestrating the entire weekend. He was very helpful to me, and made my job much easier. We got so many great questions over the weekend, and we were able to answer most, if not all, of them.  And having six people live in the building provided an additional layer of questions and feedback. My thanks to Benjamin Sandman for his help with our calcaneal sensorium demonstration. He said it perfect when he said he was surprised at how much better he could sense the ground under his L calcaneus even after the demonstration was over.  

It was truly and honor to have attendees from 14 countries. It is amazing to think that this technology exists, and I am very thankful that fellow movement specialists were willing to spend time with us, even from the other side of the world. Even though most, if not all, of the 72 of the live-stream attendees were in their homes, it was comfortable for me as well to be in my home-away-from-home and spend some quality I&I time with so many like-minded peers. 

Posted August 26, 2021 at 4:19PM
Categories: Courses Techniques Science

It would be a colossal understatement to say that the last 18 months have been a substantial change for everyone on the planet. However, for this one weekend, it was very refreshing to get a slice of normalcy. It was my distinct honor to teach Myokinematic Restoration to a group of movement specialists in Lombard, IL. It was exceptionally refreshing for me to interact with this diverse and eager group of peers.  

Our exploration into normal mechanics and eventually transferring into the patho-compensatory mechanics that can result from living and performing in a pattern. Discussing which muscles are properly positioned compared to muscles that are poorly positioned allowed us to proceed to testing. This is the only course in PRI that allows us to explain and have lab time specific to the Hruska Abduction and Adduction Lift tests. The relatively small class size provided us ample opportunity for lab on Day 2. This course has always had a lot of lab time built into it, and we had nearly 7 hours of lab time. We were able to explain and perform 16 PRI Non-manual activities. It was a blessing to have that much lab time.

 

It was wonderful to have a PRI veteran, Ryne Gioviano, in attendance. Having his perspective and insight with very helpful. Brandee Barbee, Terris Hightower, Ryan Daniels, Kasia Galica, and Shirley Montoya were exceptionally helpful with their questions and perspective. It was an honor to have Dr. Stephen Sikorsky in attendance as well. Having a chiropractor in the audience provides level of clinical experience and expertise that is undeniable and very helpful to fellow attendees.

 

Thank you to those who attended as it felt closer to normal. Here's hoping we all get back to normal sooner than later.     

Posted August 10, 2021 at 3:26PM
Categories: Clinicians Courses Science

The "flagship" course in PRI is Postural Respiration because how and where air enters our body facilitates how the rest of the body performs. This is a very dense course with a lot of research and neurology behind the musculoskeletal ramifications of faulty airflow patterns. The huge advantage this live-stream course provided is the ability of the course attendee to go back and listen to the course material again for two weeks. We were fortunate to have a few in-person attendees as well as many on-line live streaming attendees.

I've had the pleasure of teaching via live-stream several times since March of last year. However, this was the first course I've taught that had a lab component since November 2019. It was very rewarding and refreshing to have the opportunity to interact with in-person humans again during a PRI course. I have missed the human interaction while teaching PRI. I know that all of the PRI faculty feel the exact same way; Ron probably more than any of us. It was a very enjoyable experience.

90-90 Hip Lift, Postural Restoration, Postural Respiration

We were able to dive deep into the neurological ramifications of human asymmetry, the potential role of dynamic respiration, and the potential negative affects of patterned respiration. Once we were able to fully delve into neurology of respiration, the AIC and BC patterns relative to respiration became a more fluid learning experience. The discussion around the left diaphragm's need for a team of muscles to assist in its endeavor to perform inhalation as well as the rib and sternal mechanics behind trunk rotation were topics of conversation that provided lively questions and conversation. These conversations permitted a deeper explanation into how and why Superior T4 Syndrome develops, as well as how to assess and manage it.  

The goal was to provide the attendee as much information as possible without overwhelming the new-to-PRI attendee. This opportunity is afforded to us by the live-stream event. With time to go back and listen to the information to help digest and understand topics that may be challenging or difficult, we are able to go a little deeper and a little faster into these concepts.

   

This course is different and has evolved over the last few years. If you haven't attended Postural Respiration in the past, or haven't attended in a while, I would recommend finding a way, sooner than later, doing so because of the many upgrades to this "flagship" course.

Posted May 27, 2021 at 4:10PM
Categories: Courses Science
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