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Interdisciplinary Integration Speaker Spotlight: Thomas Stoffregen

There is not a week that goes by in my world of PRI practice that someone does not either lament about or experience dizziness, motion sickness or nauseousness.    I had the opportunity to talk Dr. Thomas Stoffregen over two years ago about his work related to Motion Sickness and since then have read many, is not most of his articles that have been published on motion sickness as a movement disorder.  He works at the School of Kinesiology in Minneapolis MN and I can still recall the very first article I read that he wrote about this topic of “motion sickness” happening when we acquire unstable control of bodily orientation.  Also he believes recovery begins when we reacquire stable control of the body.  His suggestion that the symptoms similar to motion sickness or those that are related to motion sickness, arise from a temporary or transient movement disorder.  This was very intriguing to me, because of my recognition of similar events that occur at a time where adaption to asymmetry appeared to be very highly correlated with symptoms of dizziness, nauseousness and motion sickness.  These correlations were becoming even more evident based when the patients I evaluated were also being evaluated and co-treated with other integrative disciplines. 

Dr. Stoffregen will be presenting on both days of this year’s Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium and his experience and research will help all of us understand how those who have spent life on the moving sea and require a period of adaptation to “get their sea legs” can also help us better understand ways to control and stabilize the moving body with “their land legs”.   I have enjoyed every conversation I have had with him and look forward to meeting him personally because of his passion to study an area that I see every day, or week, with patients who believe they are on a water based vessel.   His direct comment to me was, “I would like to relate classical motion sickness to dizziness, migraine, concussion and quantitative ‘signatures’ of health that may exist in patterns of bodily movement.”   If you are working with patients who have dizziness and sea legs when on land you do not want to miss this presentation and discussion on how it relates to PRI patterns!

To learn more about Interdisciplinary Integration click HERE.

Posted March 13, 2017 at 2:11PM

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