Posts by Ron Hruska

Driving a few hours down Interstate 80 to give a course on Posture and the Diaphragm is absolutely one of the most rewarding experiences I could have.   Kearney is in the heartland of America, where the westward push of the railroad began as the Civil War ended.    This course was held at the University of Nebraska-Kearney.  Scott Unruh Ed.D, ATC, director of the Athletic Training program was our host coordinator and once again made all of us feel at home, even when the band was practicing down the hallway.    Whitney Schroer ATC, our PRI student intern for the summer, was there to help with registration and administrative processes.   Whitney is also working on obtaining her MPA through Grand Valley State.   I asked her what she appreciated the most by attending her first PRI course on Postural Respiration and she replied; “I did not recognize how everyone is stronger on the right lower extremity during right push off and right hip extension.   This allows them to rotate better to the left with their torsos and trunks, which is why they like to run counterclockwise around tracks versus clockwise”.  She also appreciated knowing that our sternum in this situation becomes rotationally oriented to the left.  Thoracic true rib rotation to the left, on a spine that remains oriented to the right, creates a flare of the distal left xiphoid and a depression of the right manubrium.  (Right BC sternum orientation reflects right rib external rotation and left rib internal rotation).    I always wonder what first time attendees take home from their first primary PRI course.

Bonnie Mevis DPT, Kathy Denning PT, and Kalista Carlson LMT were so helpful in allowing me to demonstrate manual technique procedures and outcomes.  We had such powerful lab time with their help.   Mark Cairns ATC,PRT and Justin Kral DPT, PRC were also instrumental in teaching and mentoring during our lab sessions.   All in all, the time on the road reflecting, this community of integrative minds and the educational setting helped me appreciate even more the history and the importance of ‘westward push’ from Kearney!

Posted June 7, 2017 at 9:23PM

As a PRI speaker I usually have a feeling of excitement about something that is going to happen in an upcoming course that I am giving.  It can be built around the subject matter.  That alone gets me excited.  The anticipation of teaching application of PRI concepts excites me.  Or the people that are attending their first or their tenth course, can rev me up.  It’s the people that attend the course, no matter how many PRI courses they have or have not taken, that makes me most excited.  People are like atoms, molecules, etc. because they all occupy an energy level above the ground state, that can be emotionally stirred up by other people.  I have been looking forward to teaching this course at Pilates Central in Wilmette, Illinois for months.  Donna Praise Byrne, Lori Sander, and Dan Houglum fuel you up no matter what sparks your interest.   I believe it was 6 years ago that taught my first course at Pilates Central, and I talked to Donna about PRI Integration for Pilates.  This Fall, she and Sarah Petrich will be presenting their first course.  So exciting!  And I learned that it is already sold out, which is so cool.  To talk over lunch about this upcoming course was so fulfilling.  The attendance at this May 20th and 21st course also included faculty member Skip George, who eventually will be teaching this course.  Another reason for anticipatory excitement!  Some shout outs to people who were so energetic; Jackie Addis thanks for keeping our veterans in mind when looking at head and neck dysfunction, Liesel Brown thanks for being such an awesome subject for lab demonstration, Camilo Evangelista thank you for your energetic and insightful application questions (you are someone I believe will be advancing PRI for many, many years), and Neal Hallinan, thank you for making symmetrical sense out of asymmetrical sense.  There were also two physical therapists in the room who were from Poland, and received their education in Poland.  Piotr Hemlich and Waldemar Sadurski, you should both know that I always get excited about people in general who are from Poland or have Polish backgrounds.  So industrious!  There were also 7 PRCs and PRTs in the room.  All of this made me thrilled to be there, and I anticipate that this will not be my last trip to Wilmette!  

Posted May 31, 2017 at 4:22PM

If someone were to ask me to describe the ideal setting, attendees, topic, and timelines for a PRI Course that I would want to organize and create, I would have responded the following way.   First, I would truly like to instruct and teach in our PRI home, our Institute, our place of study, work and fun, our resource center, our reference center, and our service center where we can serve nourishment both in the form of food and didactical discussion.   Second, I would invite a mix of course attendees and disciplines that were new to PRI; and some that took the first offered PRI courses offered years ago. (Joan Hanson and Lori Thompsen you will always remain young in my heart and mind).  Third, I would limit the class to 20 attendees to maximize the individual interaction and participation.  Fourth, I would want to have lunch with all of them and talk about things that they wanted to talk about with me. Fifth, I would pick objectives and subject matter related to the head, neck, teeth, vision, and neuro-patterning.   Sixth, I would hold the course on a Friday and Saturday and I would do it at the astronomical beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere or mid-March.   And finally, I would like to participate with some professionals that I work with in this community, since I lecture and talk to so many attendees, that work in different disciplines and also in different communities.   Pat Brinkman-Falter BSDH, MS, RDH,CO,  Susan Christiansen DDS,  Janae Greer PT, DPT,  and Charissa Johnson PT,ATC, thank you for coming to this community educational course.   I respect and appreciate you all so much.   I look forward to each and every course that is hosted here in Lincoln Nebraska, home of the PRI minds.  

Posted March 30, 2017 at 7:11PM

After working with Dr. Heidi Wise for almost a decade, I have come to the realization that I learned the most about postural destabilization and de-patterning from her.   Our vestibular system thrives on imbalance.  We are upright processing, bipedal minded and protective patterned humans and our dependency on stability often limits sequential, reciprocal, and comprehensive interdependency which is needed for us to manage and handle complexity and creativity.   I have witnessed this in the work that we do in PRI Vision on a weekly basis.   Our visual perspectives can have a lasting impact on our behavioral and functional processing of input that is “new” or complex, only if it is flexible and accommodating to our need to remain calm.  Dr. Wise will discuss how “optic flow” and the visual “lens” that is necessary for relaxation, can influence our need to remain flexible, calm, interdependent and egomotion minded. She has become a gift to our worlds of dependency and over achievement.   We are sharing her with you and her presentation will be a take home gift. 

Register here.

Posted March 30, 2017 at 3:43PM

Our ability to acquire new passions, interests, and behavior requires recognition of our nescience and curiosity.   I met Wren McLaughlin, I believe, in 2012, at a Temporal Mandibular Cervical course and remember how much diverse interest this women’s health clinical specialist had in so many areas.   In an unintentional way she has a psychoenergetic sense to her that has resonated with me ever since;  yet she reminded me that she has never taken a “psychology” course.  Her gift of coherence is truly remarkable and her students get a course on psychology every time they hear her.   That is why I am so happy she agreed to talk about how to fully stay creative by establishing a stable sense of self for those new, challenging, provoking and “unstable” opportunities or patterns that you do not want to miss or recognize for life changing enjoyment.  This could be the presentation that you will not forget because of the way she “unlocks” those that are too certain and too stable.   It is not too late to unlock your schedule and register for this symposium to hear this speaker. 

Register HERE

Posted March 23, 2017 at 3:07PM

There is not a week that goes by in my world of PRI practice that someone does not either lament about or experience dizziness, motion sickness or nauseousness.    I had the opportunity to talk Dr. Thomas Stoffregen over two years ago about his work related to Motion Sickness and since then have read many, is not most of his articles that have been published on motion sickness as a movement disorder.  He works at the School of Kinesiology in Minneapolis MN and I can still recall the very first article I read that he wrote about this topic of “motion sickness” happening when we acquire unstable control of bodily orientation.  Also he believes recovery begins when we reacquire stable control of the body.  His suggestion that the symptoms similar to motion sickness or those that are related to motion sickness, arise from a temporary or transient movement disorder.  This was very intriguing to me, because of my recognition of similar events that occur at a time where adaption to asymmetry appeared to be very highly correlated with symptoms of dizziness, nauseousness and motion sickness.  These correlations were becoming even more evident based when the patients I evaluated were also being evaluated and co-treated with other integrative disciplines. 

Dr. Stoffregen will be presenting on both days of this year’s Interdisciplinary Integration Symposium and his experience and research will help all of us understand how those who have spent life on the moving sea and require a period of adaptation to “get their sea legs” can also help us better understand ways to control and stabilize the moving body with “their land legs”.   I have enjoyed every conversation I have had with him and look forward to meeting him personally because of his passion to study an area that I see every day, or week, with patients who believe they are on a water based vessel.   His direct comment to me was, “I would like to relate classical motion sickness to dizziness, migraine, concussion and quantitative ‘signatures’ of health that may exist in patterns of bodily movement.”   If you are working with patients who have dizziness and sea legs when on land you do not want to miss this presentation and discussion on how it relates to PRI patterns!

To learn more about Interdisciplinary Integration click HERE.

Posted March 13, 2017 at 2:11PM

Posted March 10, 2017 at 5:32PM

The word “symposium” means a formal meeting at which experts deliver addresses on a topic that relates to a collection of opinions on a subject.    Remodeling dynamic perception and behavior for appropriate functional periods of time and places of neurologic “instability” is the subject of this year’s 9th Annual Interdisciplinary Symposium.  There probably is not a greater influencer on neuro-mechanical “over” or “hyper”compensation and “over” or “hyper” stabilization than pain.  That is why we asked Sue Falsone PT, MS, SCS, ATC, CSCS, COMT, RYT to give her perspective on the topic of pain and its influences on our intervention programs.   Her experience and practical methods that can be implemented to identify pain generators should help our patients, clients and athletes decrease this “over” or “hyper” drive for protection, stabilization and patterning.  The course attendee will not only appreciate the many perspectives of pain influencing functional outcomes but will also listen to a very well known and positive minded speaker who knows how to relate motor control or lack of to pain.

To learn more click here.

Posted March 3, 2017 at 8:47PM

I attended  a Myokinematic Restoration course this last weekend in NYC and I was scheduled to teach the course, but had the most wonderful opportunity to attend the course, as an attendee and an instructor assistant.  First of all, I always enjoy going to New York because it offers me the ability to spend time with my two grandsons, Maxwell and Dash, who live in the heart of the Meatpacking District.  I always enjoy the culture and the eclectic backgrounds of course attendees who live and come to PRI courses in  New York City.  And I appreciate, so much, the hospitality of the Finish Line Physical Therapy  staff.  Michael Conlon has become a good friend of ours and has accommodated us over the last few years in the most gracious manner.   However, this trip allowed me to see a new PRI faculty member instruct and mentor and teach me on how to “apply examination and assessment skills to neuromuscular dyssychrony and postural asymmetries that affect stability and function of the lower half”, or how to apply the third outlined objective for this course, in a manner that I have never experienced before. Dan Houglum MSPT, ATC/L, PRC held my attention the entire two days  and took me on a course that was historically and clinically presented through his lens, as a student of mine 20 years ago and as a PRI seasoned clinician and now a faculty member today.    Dan not only is one of our most prepared presentors but one of our most precision based and practical minded clinicians.  His comments on how “resistance” becomes “assistance” still resonates as I write this.  I was so proud to be his student and so humbled to be his assistant and know that any future course attendee that has the opportunity to hear him and listen to him will also be engaged and listened to, by him. 

Posted March 2, 2017 at 4:44PM

Message from Ron: Our ability to execute purposeful, controllable and stable movement often depends on how we use or do not use our teeth for occlusal reference.  On the second day of this year’s Spring Symposium, Elizabeth Caughey, DDS will present her perspectives on how to use dental occlusion to free up or retrain over-stabilizing muscle of the head and neck.  Her presentation will enlighten anyone who wants to know more about bite splints that can positively destabilize over used or programmed muscles of the neck through re-programming effort from the masticatory system and proprioception received from the teeth.  Elizabeth is an energetic practitioner and I feel so honored to have her speak on a topic that she is so passionate about.  I am sure she will enlighten us on how to work with dentists who are interested in reducing neck tension that often correlates with facial pain.

Elizabeth's Talk:

Deprogramming versus Destabilization: A Dentist’s Perspective on Effective Splint Design

For years dentists have treated facial pain with bite splints of every design. This talk will compare the limitations of simple dental deprogramming, against the greater goals of destabilization necessary to reduce cervical tension.  We will also cover key elements of splint design needed to awaken the dental sense organ and masticatory system, for the purposes of informing the body of proprioception and how to move through space.

Register for Interdisciplinary Integration

Posted February 3, 2017 at 4:34PM
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